_daisylynch
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Hi!

I was very tempted to apply to TCD after visiting there last year, and my family are originally Irish so I get a scholarship too. I currently live in England, and I'm basically looking for some advice and help about applying!

What's the cost, and how does it differ from studying in the U.K.?
What is it like to study there?
Do you fee alone not being in your own country?
Would you reccomend it?
Is it difficult to get in?

And anything else I would really appreciate, thank you

(Also really didn't know what forum to put this in?!?!)
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gutenberg
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(Original post by _daisylynch)
Hi!

I was very tempted to apply to TCD after visiting there last year, and my family are originally Irish so I get a scholarship too. I currently live in England, and I'm basically looking for some advice and help about applying!

What's the cost, and how does it differ from studying in the U.K.?
What is it like to study there?
Do you fee alone not being in your own country?
Would you reccomend it?
Is it difficult to get in?

And anything else I would really appreciate, thank you

(Also really didn't know what forum to put this in?!?!)
I'm an alumna of TCD so I'll try to answer as many of your questions as possible....

If you're an EU national then you should qualify for 'Free Fees', which means you'll pay an annual registration fee of 3,000 euros (plus the USI and Sports Centre charges which come to be about 130 euro per year). The key difference with the UK is that there are no maintenance loans. Irish students can qualify for assistance grants from their local councils, but the income thresholds are quite low, and if you're not resident in Ireland then you're not eligible I don't think. Obviously the fees are much lower, but there's not really any assistance with living costs. I don't know of the scholarship you mentioned in your OP?

TCD is really nice and a good place to study. Which course(s) are you interested in? The campus is great - right in the city centre so really easy access to shops, pubs, clubs etc. There's a copyright library so the resources are good for a lot of humanities courses. Classes especially once you get past the first year or two tend to be small, though remember degrees are four years long.

As regards whether it's hard to get in, the vast majority of admissions to the Irish universities are done solely on results: there's no personal statements etc., and you'll have to wait until August to find out whether you're in, after Irish students have received their exam results. In the winter before you start you need to apply to the Central Admissions Office (CAO). On your CAO form you can list up to ten courses from any of the Irish unis or ITs, in order of preference. Then you sit the exams, get your results, and then wait to see if you have scored enough CAO points for your first-choice course.
CAO points for each individual course are determined by supply and demand, so very popular courses like law for example have higher points needed for entry. I'll try explain it as best as can.
Say your preferred TCD course is History, which has 40 places. When the exam results come out, the CAO looks at all of the students who have listed History at TCD as their first choice, and then the 40 students with the highest marks get the places; the student who gets the last place (i.e. the one with the lowest mark of the 40), their points are listed as the cut-off for the course. In 2016 for History, that student scored 495 points.

The conversion for A-levels is as follows:

A* - 180 points
A - 150 points
B - 130
C- 100-
D- 65
E- 45

So, with the History example, you would need 495 or better from your converted A-level grades in order to get a place. So that translates as A*A*A, meaning 510 points.

I hope that helps a bit - it's difficult to explain well but the system is actually fine once you're in it. The difficult bit is making sure you get the grades, as there isn't much wriggle room if you fall short. There's a page for A-Level applicants on TCD's site here.

Any other questions I'd be happy to try and answer - having an idea what course(s) you'd be interested in would allow me to be a bit more specific.
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_daisylynch
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Report Thread starter 3 years ago
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(Original post by gutenberg)
I'm an alumna of TCD so I'll try to answer as many of your questions as possible....

If you're an EU national then you should qualify for 'Free Fees', which means you'll pay an annual registration fee of 3,000 euros (plus the USI and Sports Centre charges which come to be about 130 euro per year). The key difference with the UK is that there are no maintenance loans. Irish students can qualify for assistance grants from their local councils, but the income thresholds are quite low, and if you're not resident in Ireland then you're not eligible I don't think. Obviously the fees are much lower, but there's not really any assistance with living costs. I don't know of the scholarship you mentioned in your OP?

TCD is really nice and a good place to study. Which course(s) are you interested in? The campus is great - right in the city centre so really easy access to shops, pubs, clubs etc. There's a copyright library so the resources are good for a lot of humanities courses. Classes especially once you get past the first year or two tend to be small, though remember degrees are four years long.

As regards whether it's hard to get in, the vast majority of admissions to the Irish universities are done solely on results: there's no personal statements etc., and you'll have to wait until August to find out whether you're in, after Irish students have received their exam results. In the winter before you start you need to apply to the Central Admissions Office (CAO). On your CAO form you can list up to ten courses from any of the Irish unis or ITs, in order of preference. Then you sit the exams, get your results, and then wait to see if you have scored enough CAO points for your first-choice course.
CAO points for each individual course are determined by supply and demand, so very popular courses like law for example have higher points needed for entry. I'll try explain it as best as can.
Say your preferred TCD course is History, which has 40 places. When the exam results come out, the CAO looks at all of the students who have listed History at TCD as their first choice, and then the 40 students with the highest marks get the places; the student who gets the last place (i.e. the one with the lowest mark of the 40), their points are listed as the cut-off for the course. In 2016 for History, that student scored 495 points.

The conversion for A-levels is as follows:

A* - 180 points
A - 150 points
B - 130
C- 100-
D- 65
E- 45

So, with the History example, you would need 495 or better from your converted A-level grades in order to get a place. So that translates as A*A*A, meaning 510 points.

I hope that helps a bit - it's difficult to explain well but the system is actually fine once you're in it. The difficult bit is making sure you get the grades, as there isn't much wriggle room if you fall short. There's a page for A-Level applicants on TCD's site here.

Any other questions I'd be happy to try and answer - having an idea what course(s) you'd be interested in would allow me to be a bit more specific.
Thank you this is absolutely brilliant !!!
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