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Muslim sues school for asking her not to wear burka on premises Watch

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    Off topic but my dad fainted in fear as a kid after seeing a woman in a burqa for the first time :rofl:
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    The article in the Guardian (link) seems to be full of a surprising amount of padding, even by the 'muh emotions' standards of that newspaper. Lots of junk about how the mother went to that school and how well her daughter performed in Year 6, which add nothing of interest to the core debate.

    I personally agree with the decision. It's proportionate. Not only are there the security concerns outlined by BigYoSpeck, but there's also the question of intimacy and familiarity. Such parent-teachers meetings are situations where a teacher is expected to convey details about a child's performance and behaviour at school. It's therefore a place where a teacher would expect a lively conversation with a parent, and, particularly at a prestigious school such as this one, the parent to show emotion and react to their suggestions for improvement. The glorified tent cloth does an excellent job at hiding your facial expression, which would feel disturbing to me, as I wouldn't be certain as to whether my feedback was getting across in the way in which I expected it to be.

    The only reason why the child was left alone and embarassed was because of the mother's lack of foresight (not buying one of those clip-on veils), and stupid religious dogma, that prohibited her from showing her face to a group of professional, middle class, middle-aged parents. Hardly a den of sexual predators whose mere witnessing of a female face could be feared to arouse lustful instincts.
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    (Original post by queenofswords)
    Off topic but my dad fainted in fear as a kid after seeing a woman in a burqa for the first time :rofl:
    An old family friend used to grab onto keys and make the sign of the cross whenever somebody in a burka walked past

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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    An old family friend used to grab onto keys and make the sign of the cross whenever somebody in a burka walked past

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    LMAO
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    (Original post by astutehirstute)
    We will see what transpires. Maybe this will be thrown out of court, I doubt it, but maybe. That would be the system working.

    But assuming it does come to court it is a monumental waste of everyone's time. The lawyers will be paid, handsomely, and we will all pay as taxpayers. Because you can bet your life Niqab Nora won't spend a penny on this herself.

    As for having a justice system accessible to all are you for real? It is a system for the rich and people like her, who will have her legal fees paid for by somebody or other, either in legal aid, or by a leftie and or Islamist group for political reasons. The average person in this country can't afford justice.
    Its not a waste. We thankfully have human rights. We all enjoy the right to privacy and the right to conduct our own affairs. We also have the right to express ourselves. So for you and I, that means we have the right to dance like an idiot in the middle of the street. For her, it means the right to wear a burka in a school. Whether she is right to have that opinion in this country is for the courts. But I love the fact that at least we can test this idea in openness.

    Your own prejudices are getting the better of you. Don't let them. It is fantastic that we can challenge authority in this country. If this were somewhere like Saudi Arabia, you would have been carted off and forced to sign a full confession by the Thought Police by now and tomorrow you would be receiving 40 lashings for such decent. Be thankful for human rights and justice. Justice is never a waste of money.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    The article in the Guardian (link) seems to be full of a surprising amount of padding, even by the 'muh emotions' standards of that newspaper. Lots of junk about how the mother went to that school and how well her daughter performed in Year 6, which add nothing of interest to the core debate.
    Agreed but then it is the Guardian, just a worthless, junk newspaper. The standard of journalism is so low nowadays, nothing on a subject of extreme political contention can be trusted, either on left or right.

    The only way we are going to not have more and more women dress up like post boxes is by social disapproval. By wider society saying it is not OK.

    There is no sign of that, and little sign even of rules like this being enforced. Whether or not she wins the case, her side IS winning the war of what is socially acceptable. Fewer and fewer schools will object to the burka (either on pupils or parents) because who needs the hassle of a court case, even if you win it?

    I can remember the first time I saw girls dressed in burkas at the girl's
    Comp across from my house. I was shocked, now I am used to it, it is probably worn by a quarter of the Muslim pupils, who form about 60% of the school. They could have enforced a uniform policy stopping it, but didn't want the argument.

    That will become more and more the norm. Unless every case like this is vigorously fought and won, and no more are brought.

    Can't see that happening, myself, as the Muslim population grows. The opposite will be the case, more likely. No?
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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    An old family friend used to grab onto keys and make the sign of the cross whenever somebody in a burka walked past

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    Did they do the same to some working class bloke in a donkey jacket and a balaclava?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    We also have the right to express ourselves. So for you and I, that means we have the right to dance like an idiot in the middle of the street.
    That is likely to get you arrested for a public order offence
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    Where are the feminists @? Hiding are we?
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    (Original post by Sammylou40)
    That is likely to get you arrested for a public order offence
    Not if you are not causing harm to anyone else and look genuinely happy. Thankfully we still have a police that generally behave like human beings and not jobsworths.
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    (Original post by astutehirstute)
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...-a7852396.html

    This woman is a vexatious litigant, what a waste of the court's time. If she wins her lawyer will be enriched as will she, and the public purse impoverished. To what good end?

    The more incidents there are like this, the more the division grows between non Muslims and non non Muslims.

    Many will feel If she is so unhappy with this, why doesn't she go and live in a country where she would be forced to wear a burka anyway? Like Afghanistan?
    The burka is a security issue- I could turn up in a burka and claim to be a parent of a muslim child, safeguarding issue and they can share passports aswell because they only ever show their eyes. We need to go down the French route ban the burka, if they do not like it they always have the option of leaving the country- we are too lenient!
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    For the same reason no one is allowed to walk into a bank or a store with a helmet or balaclava on, pupils should not be covering up their whole faces in schools to the extent that we cannot identify them. We are not telling her what she can and cannot wear, we are telling her to follow the laws and practices of the society in which she lives.
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Did they do the same to some working class bloke in a donkey jacket and a balaclava?
    Nah. They just clutched their stuff extra close to them though.

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    (Original post by orderofthelotus)
    This is pretty dramatic. She was "shaken" and "broke down" and left feeling like she "didn't belong"? It's not that deep. You could just wear a detachable niqab and put it back on once you leave the school premises. Rules are rules. People don't complain about not being allowed to park around school gates.
    Yea, she doesn't.

    This practice doesn't belong anywhere. Sad that it does in places. Maybe go to them.
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    I mean, why not let women wear what they want?
    Because it's unhealthy. She will probably have osteoporosis by the time she is 40, because of lack of D vitamin, because of lack of exposition to sunlight, and you will pay for it because you pay for the public medical care.

    For the same reason are forced to use their seatbelts. There is no other reason for forbiding them to have serious body damage or suicide, but the cost of public medical service, and the money the state has invested in public education and wants that person to pay this back before it dies.

    Also, recent research shows that lack of D vitamin increases the risk of infections, as well the lack of expostion to sunlight is bad for mental health of people.
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    Test. (thanks ).
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    Because it's unhealthy. She will probably have osteoporosis by the time she is 40, because of lack of D vitamin, because of lack of exposition to sunlight, and you will pay for it because you pay for the public medical care.

    For the same reason are forced to use their seatbelts. There is no other reason for forbiding them to have serious body damage or suicide, but the cost of public medical service, and the money the state has invested in public education and wants that person to pay this back before it dies.

    Also, recent research shows that lack of D vitamin increases the risk of infections, as well the lack of expostion to sunlight is bad for mental health of people.
    OK, so why not ban fizzy drinks, cigarettes and chocolate bars. They are unhealthy as well!
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    OK, so why not ban fizzy drinks, cigarettes and chocolate bars. They are unhealthy as well!
    Because half of a price, or more, of the first two is already made of taxes that pay more money to the budget, than these unhealthy products do damage to it. While chocolate is beneficial to mental health, as it helps to fight depression, but I agree that sweets should be extra taxed, the same way as cigarretes are.
    Besides, nor the British law or culture forces anyone to drink or smoke all the time, while the sharia forces them to wear those scary, fully covering things all the time when there is only a slight chance that a man can see them.

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    Moreover I'm not exactly serious about this. Let's say, it's just a factor we should think about.

    But there are other reasons, that already have been mentioned in this thread, for which I think there should be some limitations on burkas and niqabs. Another reason I might add, that British culture must give a stand to the most arrogant of the foreign culture, if Britain is to stay just quite British at the end of this century.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    Because half of a price, or more, of the first two is already made of taxes that pay more money to the budget, than these unhealthy products do damage to it. While chocolate is beneficial to mental health, as it helps to fight depression, but I agree that sweets should be extra taxed, the same way as cigarretes are.
    Besides, nor the British law or culture forces anyone to drink or smoke all the time, while the sharia forces them to wear those scary, fully covering things all the time when there is only a slight chance that a man can see them.

    Moreover I'm not exactly serious about this. Let's say, it's just a factor we should think about.

    But there are other reasons, that already have been mentioned in this thread, for which I think there should be some limitations on burkas and niqabs. Another reason I might add, that British culture must give a stand to the most arrogant of the foreign culture, if Britain is to stay just quite British at the end of this century.
    I don't understand how Muslim women are not seem to be proud of Britain as much as others are, I mean I am very proud of Britain and its culture!
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    Good points made so far.
 
 
 
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