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Chemistry Vs Geography a level Watch

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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    Yeah that's what I was considering doing. I'm just a bit wary of it being overwhelming that's why I want to prepare somehow, even if it's a little so I feel a bit comfortable with the transition into as level.
    If you want to start studying then buy revision guides and textbooks now and just do a few hours a week per subject if you want (hours you want to study is up to you).

    However do you know what exam boards you are doing for each subject?
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    If you want to start studying then buy revision guides and textbooks now and just do a few hours a week per subject if you want (hours you want to study is up to you).

    However do you know what exam boards you are doing for each subject?
    I think they are all WJEC and there are hardly any guides specifically made for that board so I'm not too sure watch guides would be the closest match.
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    (Original post by Priyanbos nots517)
    I think they are all WJEC and there are hardly any guides specifically made for that board so I'm not too sure watch guides would be the closest match.
    Take a look at their specifications for those subjects.
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    Take a look at their specifications for those subjects.
    That's what I've been doing but there are so many other exam boards and guides made for other exam boards that I don't know which one to choose.
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    I did a chemistry A level and I really enjoyed it! Chemistry A level takes what you learn at GCSE and just expands upon it.
    I did geography at GCSE but didn't take it onto A level, however some of my friends did. Apparently the topics you do at A level were all very different to the ones we did at GCSE, so it doesn't really expand on GCSE knowledge and with a lot of the topics they had to start from scratch. I also heard people complaining about how boring some of the topics were, but they did describe it as 'easy'.

    That's just from my experience it may be different at your sixth form, hope this helps.
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    That's what I've been doing but there are so many other exam boards and guides made for other exam boards that I don't know which one to choose.
    I'd say just leave it then and wait till you start college. Your college should let you swap subjects in the first few weeks if you discover the course isn't for you.
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    I'd say just leave it then and wait till you start college. Your college should let you swap subjects in the first few weeks if you discover the course isn't for you.
    Yeah but I'll do some research into each subject and see what It's like.
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    (Original post by OwlOfFire)
    I did a chemistry A level and I really enjoyed it! Chemistry A level takes what you learn at GCSE and just expands upon it.
    I did geography at GCSE but didn't take it onto A level, however some of my friends did. Apparently the topics you do at A level were all very different to the ones we did at GCSE, so it doesn't really expand on GCSE knowledge and with a lot of the topics they had to start from scratch. I also heard people complaining about how boring some of the topics were, but they did describe it as 'easy'.

    That's just from my experience it may be different at your sixth form, hope this helps.
    Thanks for the advice. How was the coursework for chemistry ? And are the practicals good?
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    Thanks for the advice! And that's where I'm stuck at. I enjoy geography more but I don't mind chemistry.The reason being that jobs with geography doesn't seem so good where as going into electrical engineering perhaps might be a more sustainable job in the future. See I'm passionate with geography but logic is chemistry (with electronics and maths a level). That's why I'm stuck :/
    Ah, in hindsight, my school might've been better off doing blocks, I took quite overlapping subjects for Sept (Further Maths, Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science) and with the exception of Chemistry everything kinda overlaps so it feels like one disgusting combined subject.
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    Thanks for the advice. How was the coursework for chemistry ? And are the practicals good?
    For the new A levels there is no coursework. The practicals were a mix, some were really interesting and others seemed a bit pointless. I wouldn't worry about the practical side too much our teacher always gave us a demonstration and we got instructions and worksheets to follow. There is always somebody around to ask for help and we usually worked in pairs or in some cases small groups of 3 or 4.
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    (Original post by AryanGh)
    Ah, in hindsight, my school might've been better off doing blocks, I took quite overlapping subjects for Sept (Further Maths, Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science) and with the exception of Chemistry everything kinda overlaps so it feels like one disgusting combined subject.
    Must have been mad.
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    (Original post by OwlOfFire)
    For the new A levels there is no coursework. The practicals were a mix, some were really interesting and others seemed a bit pointless. I wouldn't worry about the practical side too much our teacher always gave us a demonstration and we got instructions and worksheets to follow. There is always somebody around to ask for help and we usually worked in pairs or in some cases small groups of 3 or 4.
    For my exam board I think there is an examination coursework prac. My exam board is WJEC. Kinda annoying. I'm not too sure though.
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    For my exam board I think there is an examination coursework prac. My exam board is WJEC. Kinda annoying. I'm not too sure though.
    I'm not sure about WJEC, but I am doing the reformed A levels on the AQA exam board, where we don't do coursework.
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    I've been trying to decide which one to pick and I just want to know what are the benefits and consequences of each one.

    Would really appreciate all advice and comments
    What courses are you thinking of doing at uni?
    The courses you are thinking of taking will influence which one you pick, as they might have particular subject requirements.

    I cant comment on chemistry because i didnt do it.
    But i did geography and loved it. There was a lot of content to learn, but it was doable. It was in a lot more depth than GCSE, but it was really interesting i found.
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    What courses are you thinking of doing at uni?
    The courses you are thinking of taking will influence which one you pick, as they might have particular subject requirements.

    I cant comment on chemistry because i didnt do it.
    But i did geography and loved it. There was a lot of content to learn, but it was doable. It was in a lot more depth than GCSE, but it was really interesting i found.
    I loved the earth sciences part of geography however for a future job it might not be so good that's why I might have to go down the engineering route with chemistry.
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    (Original post by OwlOfFire)
    I'm not sure about WJEC, but I am doing the reformed A levels on the AQA exam board, where we don't do coursework.
    That's lucky, I think I'm assessed on a practical and analysis tasks set on a date the board says.
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    I take both geography and chemistry at a-level. Chemistry takes a lot of time to get your head around most of the concepts, but geography you have to spend a lot of time learning the case studies.

    If you want to go into science, definitely take chemistry. Although most geology, environmental sciences and geography courses like you to have geography and will accept maths as your science, if they haven't already said that geography counts as the science. Most universities like students with geography at a-level, because it teaches the key skills needed at university. You spend a lot of time on research techniques and sourcing, which you will most definitely need, no matter what subject you take.

    Personally, I spend a lot of time on chemistry, because I know I need to, where geography I put very little time in to. I write my case studies on flash cards and only look at them a couple of days before the exam, and I get the grades I need. This will not be the same for anyone, but you can compare how much work you did at GCSE and see the results you get. I got a B in GCSE Chemistry and did not even have a teacher for a year, but put a bit of work in and motivated myself. I really cared what I got in geography and panicked a lot about it, so now I know my abilities in the subject, I am a lot more laid back with geography, where I am still trying to prove myself to my teachers in chemistry.

    Overall, I think the step up between GCSE to A-level is a lot smaller in geography, and you mainly cover the same things anyway, so it was a lot easier this year, in my opinion. If you are that stuck on deciding, have you tried speaking to both your geography and chemistry teacher and explaining your situation?

    Also, if you take geography at university you could go into many jobs, so do not worry about that. For example: teaching secondary, university lecturer, PhD in it, research scientist in a university, Environmental Agency, Defra, the council, British Geological Survey, USGS or the ones in any other country.
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    (Original post by ScienceWise2017)
    I take both geography and chemistry at a-level. Chemistry takes a lot of time to get your head around most of the concepts, but geography you have to spend a lot of time learning the case studies.

    If you want to go into science, definitely take chemistry. Although most geology, environmental sciences and geography courses like you to have geography and will accept maths as your science, if they haven't already said that geography counts as the science. Most universities like students with geography at a-level, because it teaches the key skills needed at university. You spend a lot of time on research techniques and sourcing, which you will most definitely need, no matter what subject you take.

    Personally, I spend a lot of time on chemistry, because I know I need to, where geography I put very little time in to. I write my case studies on flash cards and only look at them a couple of days before the exam, and I get the grades I need. This will not be the same for anyone, but you can compare how much work you did at GCSE and see the results you get. I got a B in GCSE Chemistry and did not even have a teacher for a year, but put a bit of work in and motivated myself. I really cared what I got in geography and panicked a lot about it, so now I know my abilities in the subject, I am a lot more laid back with geography, where I am still trying to prove myself to my teachers in chemistry.

    Overall, I think the step up between GCSE to A-level is a lot smaller in geography, and you mainly cover the same things anyway, so it was a lot easier this year, in my opinion. If you are that stuck on deciding, have you tried speaking to both your geography and chemistry teacher and explaining your situation?

    Also, if you take geography at university you could go into many jobs, so do not worry about that. For example: teaching secondary, university lecturer, PhD in it, research scientist in a university, Environmental Agency, Defra, the council, British Geological Survey, USGS or the ones in any other country.
    Thanks lots for the advice. Honestly, that is word for word exactly how I felt with geography and chemistry, I was enjoying geography so much that I could be a bit more laid back where as chemistry I just felt i wanted to do good for some reason. I have asked both teachers but they say that it's ultimately up to me to decide. I thought if I go into something geographical the range of jobs would be small and the pay might not be good that's why I'm doubting a career in it as it might not be the best long term, I don't know really.
 
 
 
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