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HELP! I want to become a paramedic but I am highly put off by the low salary. Watch

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    For the past few years I have realised that paramedic science is a career that I would like to pursue. However having looked at the starting salary and looking at the small amount that it increases I'm concerned about taking on this career choice. I have just finished my GCSEs and I'm going to college in September to study Medical Science diploma, Psychology and Drama and Theatre Studies. Are there any other career paths which you think I should take in the 'medical' field.
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    I'm afraid, speaking as someone who had 8 years NHS experience, the low salary is part of the deal. It's the same for nurses, radiographers, physiotherapists. There is scope for advancement, and you can climb the bands, and something the NHS has that a lot of work doesn't is a very generous annual leave allowance. 27 days + 8 days bank holidays a year, increasing to 29 after 5 years and then 33 after 10 years. I literally can't wait to hit 10 years in the NHS, the annual leave is brilliant. Some people might prefer better salary, but honestly, the NHS relies on the fact that caring people will be drawn to the profession and the thought of making a difference to other peoples lives tends to be more important than how much you earn.

    Basically, don't be put off. Working in healthcare is very rewarding because you are making a real difference to people's lives. I would never work in a non-healthcare profession having experienced the feeling you get helping others. Can't really put a price on that!

    Also, have a look into radiography or physiotherapy. They are good alternatives to traditional healthcare entry points (e.g. nursing) and as I am aware they are still bursary funded, or at least radiography was last time I checked!

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...s-and-training

    Also, more specialist disciplines like radiography and physiotherapy tend to allow faster progression through the bands. Most radiographers will hit band 6 within a few years of qualifying, and seniors will hit band 7. Source - I work I've worked in radiotherapy for 8 years!

    Also remember that band 5 is merely a newly-qualified grade, anyone with ambition would be pushing for additional training and responsibility within 2-3 years of qualifying to achieve a more senior grade (e.g. band 6 or even band 7). The NHS does have a comprehensive professional development framework, and learning new skills is actively encouraged (and expected!). You wouldn't stay on band 5 for more than a few years if you are good!

    ETA - Whatever career in healthcare you are pursuing make sure you look at the A-Level requirements *beforehand* Radiographers generally need to have done science a-levels or equivalent. Ask a health care careers advisor before you enroll in a course to make sure it will be suitable for further training if you go down that route.
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    (Original post by PepticSalve)
    I'm afraid, speaking as someone who had 8 years NHS experience, the low salary is part of the deal. It's the same for nurses, radiographers, physiotherapists. There is scope for advancement, and you can climb the bands, and something the NHS has that a lot of work doesn't is a very generous annual leave allowance. 27 days + 8 days bank holidays a year, increasing to 29 after 5 years and then 33 after 10 years. I literally can't wait to hit 10 years in the NHS, the annual leave is brilliant. Some people might prefer better salary, but honestly, the NHS relies on the fact that caring people will be drawn to the profession and the thought of making a difference to other peoples lives tends to be more important than how much you earn.

    Basically, don't be put off. Working in healthcare is very rewarding because you are making a real difference to people's lives. I would never work in a non-healthcare profession having experienced the feeling you get helping others. Can't really put a price on that!

    Also, have a look into radiography or physiotherapy. They are good alternatives to traditional healthcare entry points (e.g. nursing) and as I am aware they are still bursary funded, or at least radiography was last time I checked!

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...s-and-training

    Also, more specialist disciplines like radiography and physiotherapy tend to allow faster progression through the bands. Most radiographers will hit band 6 within a few years of qualifying, and seniors will hit band 7. Source - I work I've worked in radiotherapy for 8 years!

    Also remember that band 5 is mearly a newly-qualified grade, anyone with ambition would be pushing for additional training and responsibility within 2-3 years of qualifying to achieve a more senior grade (e.g. band 6 or even band 7). The NHS does have a comprehensive professional development framework, and learning new skills is actively encouraged (and expected!). You wouldn't stay on band 5 for more than a few years if you are good!
    Thanks so much for the reply. I love the idea of being able to help people and I already volunteer at various points throughout the week. Honestly money isn't an issue for me, it's more the job satisfaction (which I know will be great as a paramedic). Basically I just don't want to be poor forever! It's nice to know that there is progression in the NHS and the annual leave allowance is very appealing. My only other concern is that if I do persue the paramedic science degree I worry that it will limit me in the future if I want a career change because of its specificity. I do feel slightly more at ease now that you have mentioned these other factors. Thanks so much!
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    (Original post by TomlHumphries)
    Thanks so much for the reply. I love the idea of being able to help people and I already volunteer at various points throughout the week. Honestly money isn't an issue for me, it's more the job satisfaction (which I know will be great as a paramedic). Basically I just don't want to be poor forever! It's nice to know that there is progression in the NHS and the annual leave allowance is very appealing. My only other concern is that if I do persue the paramedic science degree I worry that it will limit me in the future if I want a career change because of its specificity. I do feel slightly more at ease now that you have mentioned these other factors. Thanks so much!
    The absolute best advice I can give you is go speak to a healthcare careers advisor as soon as you are able to, and definitely before you start your sixth form / college in September!

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/

    They will give you far more detailed information than I can and make sure you get onto the right path with your qualifications.
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    (Original post by PepticSalve)
    The absolute best advice I can give you is go speak to a healthcare careers advisor as soon as you are able to, and definitely before you start your sixth form / college in September!

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/

    They will give you far more detailed information than I can and make sure you get onto the right path with your qualifications.
    Okay. Thanks so much for all of the advice! Really appreciate it. I will speak to a healthcare careers advisor ASAP.
 
 
 
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