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Is it worth getting a degree in IT if your area is infrastructure support and NOT pro Watch

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    First things first I work in support already, am I better of getting industry certifications or going down the degree route? Is it worth it now in my mid 20s to get a degree? Il be like 30 when Im done.. Im thinking more for the future tbh I'd probs want to go into IT management.


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    Your thread title seems to have been cut off, so it's not entirely clear what you're asking.

    In terms of your age for pursuing a degree in the area, it's not by any means uncommon or unusual. A degree would probably necessitate a break from your current work, and probably then reapplying for roles after graduation - this would probably be pretty straightforward and not too time consuming for someone with both a degree and a good amount of experience. But another consideration.

    For management roles it depends on how your organisation works - some by policy won't promote above a certain level without a degree. You may be able to track into a management position in your current organisation without any further external qualification. There's not really a clear cut answer as it very much depends on your position currently and your own inclinations.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Your thread title seems to have been cut off, so it's not entirely clear what you're asking.

    In terms of your age for pursuing a degree in the area, it's not by any means uncommon or unusual. A degree would probably necessitate a break from your current work, and probably then reapplying for roles after graduation - this would probably be pretty straightforward and not too time consuming for someone with both a degree and a good amount of experience. But another consideration.

    For management roles it depends on how your organisation works - some by policy won't promote above a certain level without a degree. You may be able to track into a management position in your current organisation without any further external qualification. There's not really a clear cut answer as it very much depends on your position currently and your own inclinations.
    Appreciate your reply, the end of my title should say "programming". I wouldn't be attending formal uni I would do distance learning, currently in the process of working out my options and contacting the relevant people. Really I just want to know if a degree betters my chances in advancing in IT infrastructure I don't want to work in helpdesk forever
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    (Original post by Got Milk)
    Appreciate your reply, the end of my title should say "programming". I wouldn't be attending formal uni I would do distance learning, currently in the process of working out my options and contacting the relevant people. Really I just want to know if a degree betters my chances in advancing in IT infrastructure I don't want to work in helpdesk forever
    It's likely a degree would be a big help in moving into an e.g. sysadmin role or something for example, if not a management roles generally in that case. However be sure the qualification is what it seems and would be acceptable for that purpose. You may also want to see if there are any part time attendance based courses available in your area - this sector often has such types of courses as they know there is a demand for gaining qualifications in this area, while working (either in the sector or not).
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    I work for a major company (not mentioning who) in support and out of our team, I'm the only one with a degree and it didn't help.

    Experience, then work based qualifications then degree qualifications are the order of importance in the companies I've worked for. Unfortunately you often really need a employer to sponsor you as to get the more advanced vendor qualifications you need to have done a certain amount of vendor led courses which are often a week long and cost a fortune (about £2500 each for ours).

    IT "Management" on this other had in my experience seems to require a total spine-ectomy.
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    (Original post by virgil1)
    I work for a major company (not mentioning who) in support and out of our team, I'm the only one with a degree and it didn't help.

    Experience, then work based qualifications then degree qualifications are the order of importance in the companies I've worked for. Unfortunately you often really need a employer to sponsor you as to get the more advanced vendor qualifications you need to have done a certain amount of vendor led courses which are often a week long and cost a fortune (about £2500 each for ours).

    IT "Management" on this other had in my experience seems to require a total spine-ectomy.
    Interesting.. what degree did you do? Also these vendor qualifications can be self studied for under a £100 not sure where you are getting the £2500 unless you are talking about going with a provider which in that case is 9 times out of ten not worth the cost.


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    (Original post by Got Milk)
    Interesting.. what degree did you do? Also these vendor qualifications can be self studied for under a £100 not sure where you are getting the £2500 unless you are talking about going with a provider which in that case is 9 times out of ten not worth the cost.


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    BSc Computer Science from a well known university.

    Wrt vendor training -have a look at the Oracle certification path. It's been a few years for me but,

    To get OCA you need to have do a couple of exams at a couple of hundred quid
    To get OCP you have to do OCA+ 2 courses with Oracle or authorised provider (generally QA) and an exam at about another couple hundred quid.
    The get OCM you need OCP plus a different couple of courses and another example which is a couple of grand.


    To get OCA might get you in the door and it's not very expensive but most places are probably looking OCP minimum I would say in my experience unless you can demonstrate a lot of experience and generally the two go hand in hand as most people who are certified have done it through work.

    Thankfully because I work for a big bank, we get a good deal on training so it's not all that expensive.
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    (Original post by virgil1)
    BSc Computer Science from a well known university.

    Wrt vendor training -have a look at the Oracle certification path. It's been a few years for me but,

    To get OCA you need to have do a couple of exams at a couple of hundred quid
    To get OCP you have to do OCA+ 2 courses with Oracle or authorised provider (generally QA) and an exam at about another couple hundred quid.
    The get OCM you need OCP plus a different couple of courses and another example which is a couple of grand.


    To get OCA might get you in the door and it's not very expensive but most places are probably looking OCP minimum I would say in my experience unless you can demonstrate a lot of experience and generally the two go hand in hand as most people who are certified have done it through work.

    Thankfully because I work for a big bank, we get a good deal on training so it's not all that expensive.
    Are you talking about programming certification?


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    (Original post by Got Milk)
    Are you talking about programming certification?


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    No, database - from speaking to Dev I believe OCP developer may not require training courses. I've not done 12c so it may have changed but 11g database OCM was as above - I've not bothered upgrading as we're not really using 12c yet and multitenant looks like a pain in the ar5e I could do without unless we use it.

    Oracle have the certification pathways on their site.

    I don't think Oracle are the only one. I'm sure one of our network guys had to submit proof of training or something for CCIE, although that may have been to get work to pay for the exam.
 
 
 
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