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Reconsidering studying in America Watch

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    Do a degree in the UK with 'Study Abroad' - most Unis will have a US possibility.

    This means you spend a year at a US Uni mid-degree - but without the massive cost of paying international student fees. If the year aboard is a compulsory part of the course (not an add-on you have chosen to do) then you will still receive SF level funding.
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    (Original post by starsandsaint)
    Alright from year 9 onwards I was dead set on going to university in america due to many reasons. Including not knowing what to study as you don't have to declare your major till second year. The whole university experience. Experiencing a different culture.Major and minor system as I like learning completely different subjects.As time has gone on I've made sure that I've become all rounded with many extra curricular and I've managed to convince my parents and researched more.I was fully certain till year 12 but then I learned more about the whole ucas system and went to open days just recently. Slowly by slowly i'm starting to reconsider going to america.The prospect of spending 4 years in a different country irks me, my friends and family are in london. London is my home.If I was to stay and study here I would definitely do a year abroad and even then I probably won't go to america I'd probably do a year abroad in Italy.Anyways, I'm so torn and am in need of advice as the application process starts quite soon.
    I would honestly recommend doing your undergrad in the UK if you know what it is you want to study. However if you're not sure then liberal arts universities in America seems like a better choice. I am not from the UK or the US so I understand your concerns about moving away and living in a different country. From personal experience and knowing both people who moved to the US and the UK for their undergrad from my country (they came back after), the ones in the UK were far more satisfied with their studies in the UK than the ones in America. (generally speaking of course). I also know someone who did their undergraduate in the Uk and now doing their masters on a scholarship in the US. In the US you have to study for 4 years whereas it's 3 years for most degrees in the UK. Another thing to consider is which state you want to move to because states vary so much and it really does affect your experience. Those that have gone to California/New York is much happier than the ones I've met that went to somewhere in Virginia.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    This is incorrect. There is almost no funding available for international students in the US, unless you go to Harvard or its ilk. FAFSA is not available for international students. There is also likely to be less as the current administration continues it's track record of gutting any public spending. Most state colleges and non Ivy League colleges do not provide any funding for international students. Even places like MIT and Stanford have extremely limited funding available (unless you have a sports scholarship at the latter). Financial aid support even for domestic students from low income backgrounds is extremely limited, and increasingly becoming so in the current administration.

    I am a US citizen and my entire family is from the US, and (most) have gone to college there - mainly to state schools or beginning in community colleges to save money. The few members of my family who went to a private college (which is most of the "better" colleges) did so because their parents had saved more or less since birth so that ONE child who had the academic background to be able to could. Trust me when I say, this is completely incorrect and I highly recommend you start looking at universities in the UK simply because it's unlikely even if accepted that you would be able to study in the US simply for financial reasons.
    If i was to travel all the way to america I wouldn't go to a non ivy as it's simply not worth it. Also the ivies do give financial although it's not need blind like it is for us citizens, there's also many programmes i can apply to which may fund my study in the united states.I'm sure I can work something out if accepted, finance will not hinder me.I'm probably being idealistic but when there's a will there's always a way.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Do you have the money to finance a degree in the US?
    Do you have or likely to get the academics?
    I wouldnt let putting off study in a foreign country. Thats one of the main reasons people go away to have new experiences.

    Apply for both and make your decision later.
    1.Not exactly
    2. Yes
    I know but my main problem is what if i regret my decision and i'm stuck miles away not enjoying the states whatsoever, thinking of that gives me anxiety.
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    (Original post by starsandsaint)
    If i was to travel all the way to america I wouldn't go to a non ivy as it's simply not worth it. Also the ivies do give financial although it's not need blind like it is for us citizens, there's also many programmes i can apply to which may fund my study in the united states.I'm sure I can work something out if accepted, finance will not hinder me.I'm probably being idealistic but when there's a will there's always a way.
    "For us citizens"? Are you American?

    If not you will struggle to get access to funding programmes.

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    (Original post by transient life)
    I would honestly recommend doing your undergrad in the UK if you know what it is you want to study. However if you're not sure then liberal arts universities in America seems like a better choice. I am not from the UK or the US so I understand your concerns about moving away and living in a different country. From personal experience and knowing both people who moved to the US and the UK for their undergrad from my country (they came back after), the ones in the UK were far more satisfied with their studies in the UK than the ones in America. (generally speaking of course). I also know someone who did their undergraduate in the Uk and now doing their masters on a scholarship in the US. In the US you have to study for 4 years whereas it's 3 years for most degrees in the UK. Another thing to consider is which state you want to move to because states vary so much and it really does affect your experience. Those that have gone to California/New York is much happier than the ones I've met that went to somewhere in Virginia.
    Yeah i'm not really sure about what it is i want to study, i'm constantly changing my mind.The extra year just to get bachelors is quite off putting and yeah i'm kinda of warming to the idea of post grad in the states. Also, if i was to go it would definitely be in a major city, can't leave London to go to somewhere like Virginia lmao. Thanks for the advice
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    "For us citizens"? Are you American?

    If not you will struggle to get access to funding programmes.

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    I was talking about how ivies do provide financial aid for internationals BUT it isn't need blind in other word it may disadvantage your application. And yes for a matter of fact there is quite a few programmes that sponsor international students to study in the states, i just need to apply. Also, i'm British and not American.
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    (Original post by starsandsaint)
    I was talking about how ivies do provide financial aid for internationals BUT it isn't need blind in other word it may disadvantage your application. And yes for a matter of fact there is quite a few programmes that sponsor international students to study in the states, i just need to apply. Also, i'm British and not American.
    International funding programmes are extremely competitive.

    Getting a place at an Ivy is extremely competitive. Even more so for internationals.

    And yet you aren't even sure you want to go...

    St Andrew's has the largest proportion of american students of any UK university. You'll like it there
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    International funding programmes are extremely competitive.

    Getting a place at an Ivy is extremely competitive. Even more so for internationals.

    And yet you aren't even sure you want to go...

    St Andrew's has the largest proportion of american students of any UK university. You'll like it there
    Competitive doesn't mean impossible. And what are you some St Andrew's promoter? it's never going to happen. I'll never leave london to go to some scottish seaside town lmao
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    (Original post by starsandsaint)
    Competitive doesn't mean impossible. And what are you some St Andrew's promoter? it's never going to happen. I'll never leave london to go to some scottish seaside town lmao
    Just a realist.

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    Are you aware you wont get any loans towards living or tuition fees if you study in the US? Also not to be rude but even if your predicted grades are AAA you'll struggle to get into an Ivy, it's a whole other league
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    (Original post by shaunnaob)
    Are you aware you wont get any loans towards living or tuition fees if you study in the US? Also not to be rude but even if your predicted grades are AAA you'll struggle to get into an Ivy, it's a whole other league
    Funding programmes and financial aid if possible. I haven't gotten my predicted grades yet but i'm quite hopeful they'll be above AAA and also thats why I've been doing many extra curriculars and doing many stuff outside of school.It's NOT just about academics
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Do a degree in the UK with 'Study Abroad' - most Unis will have a US possibility.

    This means you spend a year at a US Uni mid-degree - but without the massive cost of paying international student fees. If the year aboard is a compulsory part of the course (not an add-on you have chosen to do) then you will still receive SF level funding.
    I get where you're coming from and this might sound a bit contradictory but If i was to stay in the UK i'd do a year abroad in somewhere like Italy. This is only because a year abroad means studying in the language of whichever country you're in and would rather learn a new language fluently and experience a different culture which isn't something you usually experience.So yeah it's either all in or all out.
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    Go to America. Provided you meet the entry requirements, pass the required tests and have the appropriate funding in place, take that opportunity and run. One of the reasons so many people are dissatisfied with their lives is because of how mundane and unadventurous said lives are. This is a great opportunity for you to enjoy a different academic experience, improve your independence and explore a different side of the world (sort of). You will study a more varied and flexible curriculum, be immersed into a different (and rather great, if you ask me) culture, and no doubt have better stories to share than those of us who go to university here in England. One of my friends has been on exchange at Berkeley and he had the best time of his life. According to him, studying in America for at least a year is something everyone should do and, based on his Facebook posts/ tagged photos, he's right! My username is "LostYouth" because I regret the way I spent my youth. I regret not doing more fun, intimidating, unconventional things when the opportunities came up. I was so obsessed with staying within the lines and doing "the done thing" that I failed to develop myself as a person. There are downsides to studying in America, e.g. it's probably much more expensive for you to study there as an international student than it would be here, you can't drink until you are 21, and you are thousands of miles away from your family. But, first, there are downsides to everything and, second, the perks of studying in America probably outweigh the negatives—subject to your grades, funding, and which university ("college") you go to.
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    (Original post by LostYouth)
    Go to America. Provided you meet the entry requirements, pass the required tests and have the appropriate funding in place, take that opportunity and run. One of the reasons so many people are dissatisfied with their lives is because of how mundane and unadventurous said lives are. This is a great opportunity for you to enjoy a different academic experience, improve your independence and explore a different side of the world (sort of). You will study a more varied and flexible curriculum, be immersed into a different (and rather great, if you ask me) culture, and no doubt have better stories to share than those of us who go to university here in England. One of my friends has been on exchange at Berkeley and he had the best time of his life. According to him, studying in America for at least a year is something everyone should do and, based on his Facebook posts/ tagged photos, he's right! My username is "LostYouth" because I regret the way I spent my youth. I regret not doing more fun, intimidating, unconventional things when the opportunities came up. I was so obsessed with staying within the lines and doing "the done thing" that I failed to develop myself as a person. There are downsides to studying in America, e.g. it's probably much more expensive for you to study there as an international student than it would be here, you can't drink until you are 21, and you are thousands of miles away from your family. But, first, there are downsides to everything and, second, the perks of studying in America probably outweigh the negatives—subject to your grades, funding, and which university ("college" you go to.
    Wow this was quite motivational. It's definitely is going to be an amazing opportunity provided i get into the right university. Yeah my main reason for going is for the varied and flexible curriculum allowing me to find the right major for me and yeah i guess i should get out of my comfort zone. Also you may call yourself 'lostyouth' but its never too late to be adventurous in your adulthood you have a whole lifetime ahead of you.After reading this i'm quite convinced thanks for the advice and i'll try and update this thread during the admission process if I remember. Wish you the best
 
 
 
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