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Applying to Oxford/Cambridge for Law while holding a concurrent offer Watch

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    Hi guys, I applied to read law last year. I only decided that I wanted to read law late last year, so I missed the application deadlines for Oxford and Cambridge. I did manage to get offers for LSE/UCL/King's though, and I firmed the LSE. I'll be starting school in 2018, because I applied for deferred entry.

    Recently, I was thinking of applying to Oxbridge this year, as I feel quite gutted that I didn't get the chance to try for Oxford or Cambridge, and they're really really great institutions. However, if I do so, what happens to my current offers? From what I know, the offer from LSE will be withdrawn, and I'll have to reapply to all the schools again. If that's the case, will LSE/UCL/KCL note that I've rejected them before, and will that play a part in their decision making process?

    I'm quite conflicted because I know that I'm essentially taking a gamble as it's obviously really difficult to get into Oxford/Cambridge. On the other hand, I feel as though I might be potentially missing out on the chance to study law at two of the best universities in the world. I also think that their teaching styles are quite good compared to the other universities, but I suppose this is subjective. I do like their 3 is to 1 system though. Appreciate all the help I can get!
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    (Original post by gnash18)
    Hi guys, I applied to read law last year. I only decided that I wanted to read law late last year, so I missed the application deadlines for Oxford and Cambridge. I did manage to get offers for LSE/UCL/King's though, and I firmed the LSE. I'll be starting school in 2018, because I applied for deferred entry.

    Recently, I was thinking of applying to Oxbridge this year, as I feel quite gutted that I didn't get the chance to try for Oxford or Cambridge, and they're really really great institutions. However, if I do so, what happens to my current offers? From what I know, the offer from LSE will be withdrawn, and I'll have to reapply to all the schools again. If that's the case, will LSE/UCL/KCL note that I've rejected them before, and will that play a part in their decision making process?

    I'm quite conflicted because I know that I'm essentially taking a gamble as it's obviously really difficult to get into Oxford/Cambridge. On the other hand, I feel as though I might be potentially missing out on the chance to study law at two of the best universities in the world. I also think that their teaching styles are quite good compared to the other universities, but I suppose this is subjective. I do like their 3 is to 1 system though. Appreciate all the help I can get!
    I dont know the process of reapplications, but i strongly suggest that you stick with your LSE offer.

    You can gamble and get into Oxbridge or get no offers from your main choices.

    My advice is to do the law programme and get a masters from oxbridge, if you really want the Oxbridge stamp of approval.

    All the best.
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    It is not possible to continue to hold your existing offers if you start a new UCAS application. So to apply for Oxbridge you would need to start again from scratch.

    I suggest you just go to LSE, it's a great offer.
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    (Original post by gnash18)
    Hi guys, I applied to read law last year. I only decided that I wanted to read law late last year, so I missed the application deadlines for Oxford and Cambridge. I did manage to get offers for LSE/UCL/King's though, and I firmed the LSE. I'll be starting school in 2018, because I applied for deferred entry.

    Recently, I was thinking of applying to Oxbridge this year, as I feel quite gutted that I didn't get the chance to try for Oxford or Cambridge, and they're really really great institutions. However, if I do so, what happens to my current offers? From what I know, the offer from LSE will be withdrawn, and I'll have to reapply to all the schools again. If that's the case, will LSE/UCL/KCL note that I've rejected them before, and will that play a part in their decision making process?

    I'm quite conflicted because I know that I'm essentially taking a gamble as it's obviously really difficult to get into Oxford/Cambridge. On the other hand, I feel as though I might be potentially missing out on the chance to study law at two of the best universities in the world. I also think that their teaching styles are quite good compared to the other universities, but I suppose this is subjective. I do like their 3 is to 1 system though. Appreciate all the help I can get!
    You can't reapply anywhere while holding a deferred place.

    Cambridge doesn't accept applications from students already at another UK university except in exceptional circumstances. Oxford does.

    But as others have said it's probably not worth the extra complications to apply to Oxbridge in a gap year and has no guarantee of success.

    But, no , LSE etc wouldn't hold a grudge if you really decide to give up your place and reapply.


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    (Original post by gnash18)
    Hi guys, I applied to read law last year. I only decided that I wanted to read law late last year, so I missed the application deadlines for Oxford and Cambridge. I did manage to get offers for LSE/UCL/King's though, and I firmed the LSE. I'll be starting school in 2018, because I applied for deferred entry.

    Recently, I was thinking of applying to Oxbridge this year, as I feel quite gutted that I didn't get the chance to try for Oxford or Cambridge, and they're really really great institutions. However, if I do so, what happens to my current offers? From what I know, the offer from LSE will be withdrawn, and I'll have to reapply to all the schools again. If that's the case, will LSE/UCL/KCL note that I've rejected them before, and will that play a part in their decision making process?

    I'm quite conflicted because I know that I'm essentially taking a gamble as it's obviously really difficult to get into Oxford/Cambridge. On the other hand, I feel as though I might be potentially missing out on the chance to study law at two of the best universities in the world. I also think that their teaching styles are quite good compared to the other universities, but I suppose this is subjective. I do like their 3 is to 1 system though. Appreciate all the help I can get!
    Stick with LSE, I know a person who got an offer at oxford for engineering rejected them to apply to MIT and got rejected by MIT then applied to oxford where he got rejected and ended up at Warwick(not that Warwick is bad).. just stick to LSE. Plus employability is approx. the same to MC firms from the two.
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    I graduated from LSE Law recently. It's a great programme if you are seriously interested in legal study—as opposed to mere practice, in which case you should probably take the GDL route—albeit that it's very intense and taxing, quite possibly on par with the Oxbridge universities in that regard. Without much bias, I think LSE is an excellent university at which to study Law: it has a tremendous reputation with top recruiters, be they Magic Circle/ White Shoe firms or elite barristers' chambers, and the course itself is well taught by experts. Rejecting this offer without a safety net would be extremely risky and may well turn out to be your biggest regret in the event either Oxbridge university rejects you (although based on numbers alone, entry to LSE Law is more competitive than all Oxbridge Law programmes). That said, most people at LSE are Oxbridge rejects and some re-apply to Oxbridge during their first term at LSE, so your dilemma is not uncommon. In fact, I would advise you to take this route if you really want an Oxbridge undergraduate education: take the LSE offer, but re-apply to whichever Oxbridge university you fancy as soon as you get to LSE. If Oxford or Cambridge take you, just drop out of LSE at the end of Michaelmas term and bear the £5,000 extra debt you'll incur in that term. However, if either Oxbridge university rejects you, stay at LSE and still have a great name on your CV. Seems smarter to me.
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    (Original post by LostYouth)
    That said, most people at LSE are Oxbridge rejects and some re-apply to Oxbridge during their first term at LSE, so your dilemma is not uncommon. In fact, I would advise you to take this route if you really want an Oxbridge undergraduate education: take the LSE offer, but re-apply to whichever Oxbridge university you fancy as soon as you get to LSE. If Oxford or Cambridge take you, just drop out of LSE at the end of Michaelmas term and bear the £5,000 extra debt you'll incur in that term. However, if either Oxbridge university rejects you, stay at LSE and still have a great name on your CV. Seems smarter to me.
    Cambridge won't entertain this. Oxford might.

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    (Original post by gnash18)
    Hi guys, I applied to read law last year. I only decided that I wanted to read law late last year, so I missed the application deadlines for Oxford and Cambridge. I did manage to get offers for LSE/UCL/King's though, and I firmed the LSE. I'll be starting school in 2018, because I applied for deferred entry.

    Recently, I was thinking of applying to Oxbridge this year, as I feel quite gutted that I didn't get the chance to try for Oxford or Cambridge, and they're really really great institutions. However, if I do so, what happens to my current offers? From what I know, the offer from LSE will be withdrawn, and I'll have to reapply to all the schools again. If that's the case, will LSE/UCL/KCL note that I've rejected them before, and will that play a part in their decision making process?

    I'm quite conflicted because I know that I'm essentially taking a gamble as it's obviously really difficult to get into Oxford/Cambridge. On the other hand, I feel as though I might be potentially missing out on the chance to study law at two of the best universities in the world. I also think that their teaching styles are quite good compared to the other universities, but I suppose this is subjective. I do like their 3 is to 1 system though. Appreciate all the help I can get!
    I think LSE is better for law, and more difficult to get in. However, It is still a big gamble to apply to Oxbridge. You need to admissions tests, interview, sample work etc. You never know what'll happen. You may not be the kind of student who performs well at interviews, for example. Also, LSE has accepted you but that doesn't mean they will accept you again next year. They get 20+ applications per place so there's no guarantee no matter how good your grades are.
    That said, Oxbridge is a totally different experience. I don't think it's going to be that much different in terms of academic merits but still Oxbridge has so much history and the atmosphere is full of interesting people. Also, the buildings are beautiful and historic. Everyone in the world knows about Oxbridge. If you look at it from a personal perspective, it's a bit different. For me, I'd personally take LSE because I think it's too risky and the experience isn't worth it for me. But everyone's different. Another thing you can consider is to apply to less competitive courses at Oxbridge if you REALLY just care about going there. For example, classics/ history/ philosophy etc. Then if you have like 10 A*'s at GCSE and A*AAa+ at A-levels you'd have a very good chance of getting accepted.
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    (Original post by LostYouth)
    . In fact, I would advise you to take this route if you really want an Oxbridge undergraduate education: take the LSE offer, but re-apply to whichever Oxbridge university you fancy as soon as you get to LSE. If Oxford or Cambridge take you, just drop out of LSE at the end of Michaelmas term and bear the £5,000 extra debt you'll incur in that term. However, if either Oxbridge university rejects you, stay at LSE and still have a great name on your CV. Seems smarter to me.
    Yea Cambridge explicitly says don't do it. But s/he has nothing to lose apart from the £20 UCAS fee.
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    (Original post by TrotskyiteRebel)
    I think LSE is better for law, and more difficult to get in. However, It is still a big gamble to apply to Oxbridge. You need to admissions tests, interview, sample work etc. You never know what'll happen. You may not be the kind of student who performs well at interviews, for example. Also, LSE has accepted you but that doesn't mean they will accept you again next year. They get 20+ applications per place so there's no guarantee no matter how good your grades are.
    That said, Oxbridge is a totally different experience. I don't think it's going to be that much different in terms of academic merits but still Oxbridge has so much history and the atmosphere is full of interesting people. Also, the buildings are beautiful and historic. Everyone in the world knows about Oxbridge. If you look at it from a personal perspective, it's a bit different. For me, I'd personally take LSE because I think it's too risky and the experience isn't worth it for me. But everyone's different. Another thing you can consider is to apply to less competitive courses at Oxbridge if you REALLY just care about going there. For example, classics/ history/ philosophy etc. Then if you have like 10 A*'s at GCSE and A*AAa+ at A-levels you'd have a very good chance of getting accepted.
    Bear in mind that people applying to Oxbridge can only apply to either whereas if that restriction were not there people would apply to both meaning that the acceptance rate will half.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Cambridge won't entertain this. Oxford might
    My friend got an offer for Classics at Ox in this way by studying at St Andrews (Philosophy, English and Psychology degree pathway) from Sep-January and reapplying in October. They had A*A*A at A2 though (for a course requiring AAA). I cannot speak as to how common this is but it is possible.

    To the OP I'd advise waiting until results day to see what your results are. If they exceed entry requirements, you could consider it, bearing in mind everything everyone else has said on the thread. LSE is an excellent institution, particularly for law.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    My friend got an offer for Classics at Ox in this way by studying at St Andrews (Philosophy, English and Psychology degree pathway) from Sep-January and reapplying in October. They had A*A*A at A2 though (for a course requiring AAA). I cannot speak as to how common this is but it is possible.
    Yup - O*ford is much happier to accept applications like this.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Yup - O*ford is much happier to accept applications like this.
    haha i like the asterisk *
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    LSE is a brilliant university and I wouldn't turn down the offer lightly. I know many people who have gone to Oxbridge and absolutely hate it because of the stress they're under; this is not to say that Oxbridge isn't for you but please consider your options carefully.


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    In my opinion (and you don't really have to listen to my advice if you don't agree with it), it would be a bad move to reject LSE to apply for Oxbridge. Oxbridge is extremely tough to get in, so it's extremely risky as you might end up without offers from LSE and Oxbridge. Furthermore, in terms of reputation Oxbridge may have a slight edge but LSE is not that far behind. Lastly, it is also important to consider the teaching environment. Are you suited to the tutorial/supervision system? Some people enjoy being in lectures rather than have the pressure of discussing in very small groups with the lecturers. Also think about the campus life. LSE has a lot of internationals (60%+) whereas the percentage at Oxbridge is much lower. Oxbridge is also more scenic and has a small town feel to it compared to London (obviously).
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    (Original post by Sacred Ground)
    LSE is a brilliant university and I wouldn't turn down the offer lightly. I know many people who have gone to Oxbridge and absolutely hate it because of the stress they're under; this is not to say that Oxbridge isn't for you but please consider your options carefully.
    Yes, an important thing to consider. The grass is not always greener on the 'other side', particularly with something as personal as mental health or stress tolerance.
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    Hi guys, thanks for your comments. To clarify, I'm an international student. The reason why I applied for deferred entry is because I can only start uni in 2017 as I need to completely 2 years of military service first. My academic results were 4As at H2 Level, I took the A Levels in Singapore. It seems like it's very risky to reject LSE for the chance to apply to Oxbridge, so I'm really taking some time to make a decision!
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    (Original post by TrotskyiteRebel)
    Yea Cambridge explicitly says don't do it. But s/he has nothing to lose apart from the £20 UCAS fee.
    Just to clarify, so I can apply to Oxford while studying LSE but I can't do this if I want to apply to Cambridge?
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    (Original post by gnash18)
    Just to clarify, so I can apply to Oxford while studying LSE but I can't do this if I want to apply to Cambridge?
    Oxford= Yes, but they will probably ask for an LSE reference
    Cambridge= NO!
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    (Original post by Tikiboom1)
    In my opinion (and you don't really have to listen to my advice if you don't agree with it), it would be a bad move to reject LSE to apply for Oxbridge. Oxbridge is extremely tough to get in, so it's extremely risky as you might end up without offers from LSE and Oxbridge. Furthermore, in terms of reputation Oxbridge may have a slight edge but LSE is not that far behind. Lastly, it is also important to consider the teaching environment. Are you suited to the tutorial/supervision system? Some people enjoy being in lectures rather than have the pressure of discussing in very small groups with the lecturers. Also think about the campus life. LSE has a lot of internationals (60%+) whereas the percentage at Oxbridge is much lower. Oxbridge is also more scenic and has a small town feel to it compared to London (obviously).
    The thought of studying in Cambridge is quite daunting, and I'm afraid that the workload will be extremely huge as well. That being said, LSE is no pushover and I don't expect the workload in LSE to be much less as compared to Oxbridge. To me, the workload is just something I'll have to cope with wherever I study, be it Cambridge or LSE. In terms of environment, I think I see the merits of living in both a small town and a big city. The campuses in Cambridge are beautiful but perhaps I would enjoy London a bit more, because there's so much to do.

    I guess I'll have to deliberate on whether it's worth it to risk my place in LSE for the chance of applying to Cambridge. Frankly, I would be very happy with LSE but a part of me wants to to find out if I'm capable of receiving an offer from Cambridge. The opportunity to study at one of the most historical and prestigious universities in the world is certainly tempting.
 
 
 
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