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    Hi,

    I'm a Scottish student studying Law with English Law in Scotland that allows me to fulfil the requirements set by the Law Society for a qualifying undergraduate LLB Law degree.

    Whilst in Scotland you must study a Diploma in Legal Practice at postgraduate level, by my understanding, it is a Legal Practice Course you must study in England?

    Is this correct? And why do so little universities offer the Legal Practice Course in England? I can't see any information on the Legal Practice Course from universities like UCL, Durham, Exeter, Bath, etc.

    Am I looking in the wrong places or do I have the name of the course wrong or what?

    Thanks
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    Traditionally only the College of Law (now known as the University of Law) offered the LPC. That has now expanded to a number of other institutions but it isn't a normal university course and the places that offer it don't align to the usual law degree providers.

    Many of the larger firms have a preference as to which provider you attend, especially if they're contributing towards the fees. So if you have a training contract offer, talk to your firm about where they would prefer you to go. My firm prefers BPP for example.

    If you don't yet have a TC, the course is very expensive so consider taking a year out and getting some work experience, secure a TC then do the LPC.
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    Great, thanks for that response
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    The end of this month is the deadline for many firms' TCs starting Sept 2019.
    https://www.lawcareers.net/Solicitor...tractDeadlines
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    Hi,

    I'm a Scottish student studying Law with English Law in Scotland that allows me to fulfil the requirements set by the Law Society for a qualifying undergraduate LLB Law degree.

    Whilst in Scotland you must study a Diploma in Legal Practice at postgraduate level, by my understanding, it is a Legal Practice Course you must study in England?

    Is this correct? And why do so little universities offer the Legal Practice Course in England? I can't see any information on the Legal Practice Course from universities like UCL, Durham, Exeter, Bath, etc.

    Am I looking in the wrong places or do I have the name of the course wrong or what?

    Thanks
    It is a professional qualification with some regulations around how it is taught. A lot of universities cannot be bothered to try and teach it where it is quite different to an LLB. It is the same reason a lot of universities do not provide other professional qualifications like CIMA or ACA.

    Bath doesn't have a law faculty so would have no reason to deliver the LPC.

    This might be a good starting point for you:

    http://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/law-schools


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It is a professional qualification with some regulations around how it is taught. A lot of universities cannot be bothered to try and teach it where it is quite different to an LLB. It is the same reason a lot of universities do not provide other professional qualifications like CIMA or ACA.

    Bath doesn't have a law faculty so would have no reason to deliver the LPC.

    This might be a good starting point for you:

    http://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/law-schools


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    Thanks very much for your response, that resource is a great help.

    One last question: I assume it is impossible to take the Legal Practice Course in Scotland, and the Graduate Diploma in Law (from Aberdeen, Edinburgh or Glasgow specifically) only allows practice in Scotland? And the upside to my English Law is that I do not have to spend 1 year converting upon graduation?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    Thanks very much for your response, that resource is a great help.

    One last question: I assume it is impossible to take the Legal Practice Course in Scotland, and the Graduate Diploma in Law (from Aberdeen, Edinburgh or Glasgow specifically) only allows practice in Scotland? And the upside to my English Law is that I do not have to spend 1 year converting upon graduation?

    Thanks.
    I haven't heard of the course being available in Scotland, probably due to the difference in jurisdictions and the lack of demand for a course. I can't think of an online LPC course either unfortunately (there might be on though), mainly where you have to do quite a lot of practical learning.

    I am not an expert in the Scottish qualification processes, but you have to take the LPC to qualify in the England & Wales. The only other option is to become a qualified lawyer in your home jurisdiction and then take the QLTS in England & Wales.

    Yes - if you meet the requirements of taking the necessary English law modules (typically Land law and Constitutional if I remember correctly) you get to skip past the GDL and go straight to the LPC. For many Scottish law graduates who have not studied English Law, they would need to take part of the GDL before going on to the LPC.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I haven't heard of the course being available in Scotland, probably due to the difference in jurisdictions and the lack of demand for a course. I can't think of an online LPC course either unfortunately (there might be on though), mainly where you have to do quite a lot of practical learning.

    I am not an expert in the Scottish qualification processes, but you have to take the LPC to qualify in the UK. The only other option is to become a qualified lawyer in your home jurisdiction and then take the QLTS in England & Wales.

    Yes - if you meet the requirements of taking the necessary English law modules (typically Land law and Constitutional if I remember correctly) you get to skip past the GDL and go straight to the LPC. For many Scottish law graduates who have not studied English Law, they would need to take part of the GDL before going on to the LPC.
    Excellent, thanks very much for your help. Looks like I know my route now.
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    Thanks very much for your response, that resource is a great help.

    One last question: I assume it is impossible to take the Legal Practice Course in Scotland, and the Graduate Diploma in Law (from Aberdeen, Edinburgh or Glasgow specifically) only allows practice in Scotland? And the upside to my English Law is that I do not have to spend 1 year converting upon graduation?

    Thanks.
    In England & Wales you would only need to take the GDL if you haven't studied law. You have, so you are exempt from that year and you can move straight to the LPC.

    I'm not sure whether the GDL in Scotland is the same, but I would suspect so. In which case you need to be taking the Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice in Scotland, or the LPC in E&W, and you can ignore the GDL.

    Sounds like you need to be clarifying in your mind which jurisdiction you think you will want to practice in.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    In England & Wales you would only need to take the GDL if you haven't studied law. You have, so you are exempt from that year and you can move straight to the LPC.

    I'm not sure whether the GDL in Scotland is the same, but I would suspect so. In which case you need to be taking the Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice in Scotland, or the LPC in E&W, and you can ignore the GDL.

    Sounds like you need to be clarifying in your mind which jurisdiction you think you will want to practice in.
    I'm 100% on which jurisdiction - I have my sights firmly set on England. I just seek clarity on the accreditation and transferring from Scotland > England.

    My understanding - the GDLP in Scotland is in place of the LPC in England. The GDL in England is used if you've not previously studied Law, but I have, so I'll only need the LPC like most other graduating English Law students.

    Route in Scotland: Undergraduate - Diploma - Training Contract
    Route in England: Undergraduate - LPC - Training Contract
    Route for me: Undergraduate (SCO) - LPC (ENG) - Training Contract
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    I'm 100% on which jurisdiction - I have my sights firmly set on England. I just seek clarity on the accreditation and transferring from Scotland > England.

    My understanding - the GDLP in Scotland is in place of the LPC in England. The GDL in England is used if you've not previously studied Law, but I have, so I'll only need the LPC like most other graduating English Law students.

    Route in Scotland: Undergraduate - Diploma - Training Contract
    Route in England: Undergraduate - LPC - Training Contract
    Route for me: Undergraduate (SCO) - LPC (ENG) - Training Contract
    Spot on.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    Spot on.
    Appreciate the help!
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    Make it clear on any application forms for training contracts that you are exempt from doing the GDL.

    Otherwise they may consider you a "non-law" graduate. Some firms in England have different application windows for law and non-law grads, and may mistakenly classify you as a non-law Grad thinking you need to take some of the GDL.


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