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    I am in my first year studying Law at Exeter, and have deferred 2 of my exams- contract, along with constitutional and administrative. My wellbeing service here advised I deferred 2 due to my wellbeing being in a vulnerable state. Anyhow, I lost my Mum before I came to uni and recently lost my grandad, so recent events have meant I am struggling to start revision. Is 3 weeks enough time to do a fair amount of revision? What effective ways are there to retain information, and how many hours a day would suffice? I am aiming for at least 8 hours a day, and hoping this is enough. Any advice is greatly appreciated!!!!
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    (Original post by Jemma_0897)
    I am in my first year studying Law at Exeter, and have deferred 2 of my exams- contract, along with constitutional and administrative. My wellbeing service here advised I deferred 2 due to my wellbeing being in a vulnerable state. Anyhow, I lost my Mum before I came to uni and recently lost my grandad, so recent events have meant I am struggling to start revision. Is 3 weeks enough time to do a fair amount of revision? What effective ways are there to retain information, and how many hours a day would suffice? I am aiming for at least 8 hours a day, and hoping this is enough. Any advice is greatly appreciated!!!!
    Exeter law graduate here! I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your mum and granddad. I want to give you some hope... I graduated with a first, but I certainly made things difficult for myself: I decided to start a different dissertation topic really late, which meant I only finished it half way through the Easter break giving me just over 2 weeks until my first exam with very little revision done. I managed to revise all my exams and get a first in all of them, so it is still possible to do well in the exams... Don't lose hope!

    Firstly, there is no correct amount of hours to revise; you have to do what feels right for you. Nevertheless, I encourage you to take regular breaks, eat and drink lots, and try to make your revision as exciting/interesting as possible.

    What worked for me was a three step process:

    1) Make sure you understand the basics - you should be able to understand all your notes such that a child would understand you if you explained them. So, make sure you actually KNOW what you were taught before you try to learn it.

    2) Condense your notes into as few pages as possible - maybe 3 pages or so per topic, and keep case facts to a line or two. You don't need to go overboard, it's all about being strong on the fundamentals. Only once this is good should you try to expand your knowledge.

    3) Revise and practice - I felt it was pretty effective doing a short burst on one topic (e.g. Wednesbury unreasonableness), then doing a practice question on that topic (either in full or in bullet points). Then I'd go over my notes to see what I left out and revise those parts, because those were the clear places I was insufficiently prepared.

    4) In the exam, don't panic. You don't actually have to know hundreds of critically quotes and alternative theories etc. Just, as I say, understand the basics and make sure that is written down. Then try and offer a unique perspective through your own subjective thinking (i.e. "do I think this is correct? Is this how the law should be? What would I change about the law etc.?") In first year, critical analysis can be that basic and doesn't require extensive knowledge of competing academic views. It also doesn't matter how clumsy you are in this critical analysis, you will get rewarded for just trying!

    If you want more advice or help on anything just let me know - feel free to send me a message! I've also written a load of notes from my time at Exeter on a website I have created, which should help you out too as it is all written in a digestible way. Although it isn't quite finished it should be really helpful

    Llama
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    (Original post by TheLawLlama)
    Exeter law graduate here! I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your mum and granddad. I want to give you some hope... I graduated with a first, but I certainly made things difficult for myself: I decided to start a different dissertation topic really late, which meant I only finished it half way through the Easter break giving me just over 2 weeks until my first exam with very little revision done. I managed to revise all my exams and get a first in all of them, so it is still possible to do well in the exams... Don't lose hope!

    Firstly, there is no correct amount of hours to revise; you have to do what feels right for you. Nevertheless, I encourage you to take regular breaks, eat and drink lots, and try to make your revision as exciting/interesting as possible.

    What worked for me was a three step process:

    1) Make sure you understand the basics - you should be able to understand all your notes such that a child would understand you if you explained them. So, make sure you actually KNOW what you were taught before you try to learn it.

    2) Condense your notes into as few pages as possible - maybe 3 pages or so per topic, and keep case facts to a line or two. You don't need to go overboard, it's all about being strong on the fundamentals. Only once this is good should you try to expand your knowledge.

    3) Revise and practice - I felt it was pretty effective doing a short burst on one topic (e.g. Wednesbury unreasonableness), then doing a practice question on that topic (either in full or in bullet points). Then I'd go over my notes to see what I left out and revise those parts, because those were the clear places I was insufficiently prepared.

    4) In the exam, don't panic. You don't actually have to know hundreds of critically quotes and alternative theories etc. Just, as I say, understand the basics and make sure that is written down. Then try and offer a unique perspective through your own subjective thinking (i.e. "do I think this is correct? Is this how the law should be? What would I change about the law etc.?" In first year, critical analysis can be that basic and doesn't require extensive knowledge of competing academic views. It also doesn't matter how clumsy you are in this critical analysis, you will get rewarded for just trying!

    If you want more advice or help on anything just let me know - feel free to send me a message! I've also written a load of notes from my time at Exeter on a website I have created, which should help you out too as it is all written in a digestible way. Although it isn't quite finished it should be really helpful

    Llama
    Thank you for replying! Wow that is absolutely phenomenal! This is probably the most insightful advice any one has given me thus far, and has given me hope for my exams- so thank you ever so much. With regards to your website, what is the address for this as I may have a look if that is perfectly ok?

    Thank you again! Jemma
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    (Original post by Jemma_0897)
    Thank you for replying! Wow that is absolutely phenomenal! This is probably the most insightful advice any one has given me thus far, and has given me hope for my exams- so thank you ever so much. With regards to your website, what is the address for this as I may have a look if that is perfectly ok?

    Thank you again! Jemma
    No worries - I'm glad it helps, you've more than enough time to do well! It's called Digestible Notes (digestiblenotes.com), and I've tried to make things as simple as possible. There are some things that aren't finished (most obviously the latter half of the criminal law notes/cases), but everything else is slowly coming together. If there is anything in particular you don't understand or need help on please do let me know; I want you to do well Hopefully the website will be helpful for you in second year too!

    Llama
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    (Original post by TheLawLlama)
    No worries - I'm glad it helps, you've more than enough time to do well! It's called Digestible Notes (digestiblenotes.com), and I've tried to make things as simple as possible. There are some things that aren't finished (most obviously the latter half of the criminal law notes/cases), but everything else is slowly coming together. If there is anything in particular you don't understand or need help on please do let me know; I want you to do well Hopefully the website will be helpful for you in second year too!

    Llama
    Ok, I shall give it a look! Thank you ever so much, and yes, I will drop you a message if anything comes up I do not particularly understand!

    Thanks again Llama, Jemma
 
 
 
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