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    Tomm98, why do you think people may be angry with you over your situation? I'm not trying to argue with you, I'm just curious.
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    Hi 04MR17, to be absolutely honest, I just feel an overriding sense of shame. My parents were not fit to have me. My situation is made worse by the fact that I am so impeded by Aspergers that I find it hard/feel ashamed in seeking appropriate help. Sure, I made it into a good Uni, but I will always be on my own. I just feel that I am always on my own, sitting down, waiting to die by a heart attack or diabetes. No one cares about me, so no one will know when I do have a heart attack in 40-50 years. Society will just continue on as normal.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    :woohoo: How does it feel?:holmes:
    It's nice that I'll get a third off any fare including Oyster for the rest of my life. Whoever travels with me - also gets a third off their fare.
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    (Original post by Student1914)
    It's nice that I'll get a third off any fare including Oyster for the rest of my life. Whoever travels with me - also gets a third off their fare.
    :shock: that sounds amazing.:woo: Is the criteria for mobility?
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    (Original post by Tomm98)
    Hi 04MR17, to be absolutely honest, I just feel an overriding sense of shame. My parents were not fit to have me. My situation is made worse by the fact that I am so impeded by Aspergers that I find it hard/feel ashamed in seeking appropriate help. Sure, I made it into a good Uni, but I will always be on my own. I just feel that I am always on my own, sitting down, waiting to die by a heart attack or diabetes. No one cares about me, so no one will know when I do have a heart attack in 40-50 years. Society will just continue on as normal.
    Well I'm sorry, but that's not good enough.

    There is no reason to be ashamed of who you are. Be proud of it. I am proud to be disabled, and wherever possible I want people to know that I am disabled and that I am proud. There is a stigma about disability, that disabled people are either normal, because their disability is so small it doesn't affect them, or it's so huge that the disabled person is good for nothing, serves no purpose in life, and might as well die. The paralympics have done much to dispell the latter, I am fighting for the former, and you need to fight to get the world to recognise who you are. Don't just give up. You are right! Everybody else is wrong, and that's their fault!

    My cousin has Asperger's, I've seen the impact it can have, don't feel ashamed about it because there will be adults across the country (let's put the planet to one side for a second) who will have un-diagnosed mental health conditions because this is a new field. Be proud that you are one of those breaking new ground. Be proud that you are making the lives of future Asperger's patients better, when the world is more aware, and treatment and care is more effective.

    Don't be disheartened. Speak to the disability support at uni and they will (should) have a community of disabled students, to give advice, help, support and guidance. There is always this thread to serve the same function.

    :grouphugs:
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    :shock: that sounds amazing.:woo: Is the criteria for mobility?
    It wasn't for mobility. It was for sensory. Born with severe hearing loss.
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    (Original post by Student1914)
    It wasn't for mobility. It was for sensory. Born with severe hearing loss.
    :ditto:

    On both sides?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    :ditto:

    On both sides?
    Yeah, my right ear is a lot worse. My right hearing aid has a different kind of mould compared to the one I'm wearing on my left ear. It's so bad I can't even hear someone whisper in my right ear with no hearing aid. My left ear is the life support at the moment.
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    Yeah, my right ear is a lot worse. My right hearing aid has a different kind of mould compared to the one I'm wearing on my left ear. It's so bad I can't even hear someone whisper in my right ear with no hearing aid. My left ear is the life support at the moment.
    Oh right. That's interesting.

    My right side looks a bit like this:


    But my left side is brilliant. How do you manage generally?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
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    Wow, that sucks. How do you feel about it?

    I just live like headphones and earphones didn't exist. As if almost everyone just read the newspaper during the commute, before everyone's face was stuck in their mobile phone. But I just immerse myself into a book of pure intellect (and some romance). I prefer people to chat to me on my left side than my right side. Whenever I watch something, I would rather watch it with subtitles, because I may not catch everything that is said (which is why Netflix is good for me). I can't lay down on my side without them becoming a nuisance (I feel you bespectacled people).

    The only advantages with hearing aids is that I'm more likely to have a peaceful sleep and use them as ear plugs in loud environments.
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    I prefer people to chat to me on my left side than my right side.
    I prefer this too. But it really makes no difference. I'm mildly deaf in my right ear (hearing aids won't help) and I don't process sound properly, meaning I usually end up guessing what people are saying, which is fun.
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    Wow, that sucks. How do you feel about it?

    I just live like headphones and earphones didn't exist. As if almost everyone just read the newspaper during the commute, before everyone's face was stuck in their mobile phone. But I just immerse myself into a book of pure intellect (and some romance). I prefer people to chat to me on my left side than my right side. Whenever I watch something, I would rather watch it with subtitles, because I may not catch everything that is said (which is why Netflix is good for me). I can't lay down on my side without them becoming a nuisance (I feel you bespectacled people).

    The only advantages with hearing aids is that I'm more likely to have a peaceful sleep and use them as ear plugs in loud environments.
    We are so similar. I am far less adversely affected than you though because I have good hearing on my left side. Headphones and particularly earphones can be so damaging to your hearing anyway. I can use earphones obviously across both, but I once cut one of the phones off and used the other.:lol: It actually worked!:toofunny:

    I've only ever needed subtitles once though.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I prefer this too. But it really makes no difference. I'm mildly deaf in my right ear (hearing aids won't help) and I don't process sound properly, meaning I usually end up guessing what people are saying, which is fun.
    :ditto: I've been there. Processing isn't an issue but that really must be a lot of concentration for you!
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    :ditto: I've been there. Processing isn't an issue but that really must be a lot of concentration for you!
    It's a pain. I'm either having to pretend I've understood or try to work it out, which isn't as easy as it sounds.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    It's a pain. I'm either having to pretend I've understood or try to work it out, which isn't as easy as it sounds.
    Is this with everyone? Are there not some people who understand and make an effort for you?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Is this with everyone? Are there not some people who understand and make an effort for you?
    I get this more with my dad I've noticed. But he doesn't have a strong accent.

    Some words and letters do sound similar though.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    We are so similar. I am far less adversely affected than you though because I have good hearing on my left side. Headphones and particularly earphones can be so damaging to your hearing anyway. I can use earphones obviously across both, but I once cut one of the phones off and used the other.:lol: It actually worked!:toofunny:

    I've only ever needed subtitles once though.
    Kind of glad I wear hearing aids though, since it makes you feel more 'connected' with reality from the ambient sounds. Because living life in almost pure silence no matter what is happening outside is depressing. It feels like my life is black and white without hearing aids.

    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I prefer this too. But it really makes no difference. I'm mildly deaf in my right ear (hearing aids won't help) and I don't process sound properly, meaning I usually end up guessing what people are saying, which is fun.
    Reminds me of a Scottish person who asked me if I wanted ace with my drink, when he actually meant ice. Took me a moment figure out what he meant.
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    Reminds me of a Scottish person who asked me if I wanted ace with my drink, when he actually meant ice. Took me a moment figure out what he meant.
    I've had similar too. Along with thinking my dad swore at me. I'm hoping he said ship...
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    Kind of glad I wear hearing aids though, since it makes you feel more 'connected' with reality from the ambient sounds. Because living life in almost pure silence no matter what is happening outside is depressing. It feels like my life is black and white without hearing aids.
    :lol: I'm also colour-blind.:rofl:

    I know what you mean though. I think from birth is often different in this sense to those people who's hearing has deteriorated. I have never known what full hearing sounds like, so I do not know how bad my hearing actually is.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I get this more with my dad I've noticed. But he doesn't have a strong accent.

    Some words and letters do sound similar though.
    Well maybe your Dad just needs reminding. I suppose it all depends on how you view your disability. Because I tend to have a take-no-prisoners kind of attitude, I'm not afraid to shout "speak up I'm deaf" to anyone, as long as I'm with people who know me. If I was on my own in a crowd it would be different because I'd just look like a rude bas****.
 
 
 
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