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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I scored 4 points on care and 0 on mobility. I had it looked at again and got 11 on care and 12 on mobility. Utterly ridiculous. I'm now in the rubbish situation that my needs have changed. They tell you to inform them if your needs have changed; but there's a chance I could lose the lot.

    She even went as far to say my GP and ENT doctor are both lying. Neither have any reason to lie.
    Is 15 points in order to continue to claim right? It's like you have to be literally dead to claim benefits. They're absurd that they think actual health professionals have a reason to lie. But these people are from a private company hired by the Conservatives.
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    Is 15 points in order to continue to claim right? It's like you have to be literally dead to claim benefits. They're absurd that they think actual health professionals have a reason to lie. But these people are from a private company hired by the Conservatives.
    8 for standard and 12 for enhanced. So, if they'd given me one more point, I would have got enhanced care.

    I was supposedly interviewed by a nurse. She asked me what Hyperacusis was.

    I complained to Atos who told me she has no reason to lie and she didn't. :lol: She couldn't get her lies straight...
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    8 for standard and 12 for enhanced. So, if they'd given me one more point, I would have got enhanced care.

    I was supposedly interviewed by a nurse. She asked me what Hyperacusis was.

    I complained to Atos who told me she has no reason to lie and she didn't. :lol: She couldn't get her lies straight...
    What a weird and random question. I remembered I was asked if I was left or right handed. I was thinking they're going to discriminate on a dominant hand?

    I think the most absurd one was: "Are you generally aware of your surroundings?"...
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    (Original post by Heptagon)
    What a weird and random question. I remembered I was asked if I was left or right handed. I was thinking they're going to discriminate on a dominant hand?

    I think the most absurd one was: "Are you generally aware of your surroundings?"...
    Even my non-medically trained friend who was with me knows what it is!
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    JUST GOT MY DSA LAPTOP!

    Very swish.
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    Now it's about looking for a printer....
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Audiology told me I can't have hearing problems because I have sight problems. Erm, what? Both are possible together.

    APD won't be picked up on the normal hearing tests. But I had one done involving voices and background noise - you repeat what the voices say. But as the tests go on, the background noise increases. And that's my problem.
    I had the same test in my early teens and was diagnosed with APD. When I was required to get my SLD assessment updated, I was diagnosed with dyslexia and dyscalculia but not tested for APD. I was told it was covered with the dyslexia diagnosis in Canada.

    I had hearing problems when I was little with ear infections and blockages. I didn't start talking until I was 3 years old. We lived in Germany at the time and shortly after I started talking, I was sent to a German preschool, I promptly stopped talking again. As a kid, even after my hearing stopped being problematic, I wouldn't talk for months at a time. I find I can get out of practice and forget to listen/talk. Listening and talking can be difficult if I don't keep it up. It's a lot of effort.
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    I appreciate the memes.

    (Original post by 04MR17)
    I am so pleased that this thread is so busy:emo:
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    My uni would consider me disabled but I don't view myself as disabled. I don't feel my conditions are severe enough to be considered disabled; people have it a lot worse than me so I didn't sign up for DSA.
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    My uni would consider me disabled but I don't view myself as disabled. I don't feel my conditions are severe enough to be considered disabled; people have it a lot worse than me so I didn't sign up for DSA.
    I live in Toronto and was told by a friend who's a lawyer that less than half of the money put aside for disabilities each year is claimed. At least in our jurisdiction. That was also true of the student grants here which is why the feds changed the whole thing because people were applying for the loans but not the free money. Now, if you apply for student loans, they automatically consider you for the grants. In terms of disabilities, people aren't registering. The only way to automate it would be a serious infringement on peoples medical records.

    I haven't signed up for everything, but I have applied for things that will contribute significantly to helping me through school. I don't need help with income, we have money coming in and I'm glad to be in that position at least. But help with things like tutors, someone to help me organize, a laptop that can handle the software I've been given, etc... these are things that I can use.

    There will ALWAYS be people who have it worse. A better question is what will level the playing field? People without your disability are unlikely to need hospital time and miss deadlines because of it. I don't think anyone is advocating to get ahead of anyone else. But getting a fair run at your eduation isn't too much to ask.
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    Very good points and I didn't know that not many people register for the support. I read the university has like a pot of money, so I thought that the money should be spent on those who may need a lot of support and adjustments to allow them to study.

    I was thinking about my appointments as well, I go to a few pretty often (got one next week actually), but they only take up a 1-3 hours of my day, kind of like my job so it wouldn't be too difficult to work around.

    I can apply later on in my study though if I wish and if I feel it may benefit me, so I may do that. However, I feel that my tutor being aware of my conditions would be the most helpful for me. They may even encourage me to apply for DSA!


    (Original post by Canucked)
    I live in Toronto and was told by a friend who's a lawyer that less than half of the money put aside for disabilities each year is claimed. At least in our jurisdiction. That was also true of the student grants here which is why the feds changed the whole thing because people were applying for the loans but not the free money. Now, if you apply for student loans, they automatically consider you for the grants. In terms of disabilities, people aren't registering. The only way to automate it would be a serious infringement on peoples medical records.

    I haven't signed up for everything, but I have applied for things that will contribute significantly to helping me through school. I don't need help with income, we have money coming in and I'm glad to be in that position at least. But help with things like tutors, someone to help me organize, a laptop that can handle the software I've been given, etc... these are things that I can use.

    There will ALWAYS be people who have it worse. A better question is what will level the playing field? People without your disability are unlikely to need hospital time and miss deadlines because of it. I don't think anyone is advocating to get ahead of anyone else. But getting a fair run at your eduation isn't too much to ask.
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    I appreciate the memes.
    :rofl: Thanks.:giggle:
    (Original post by hannxm)
    My uni would consider me disabled but I don't view myself as disabled. I don't feel my conditions are severe enough to be considered disabled; people have it a lot worse than me so I didn't sign up for DSA.
    I don't normally think of myself as disabled. I don't every day think "oh what if I could hear properly". It all depends on the person and their perception of their own condition(s).

    My advice would always to be apply.

    Because I am (partially) deaf from birth, I don't understand how deaf actually am, because I don't know any different. I am guessing you are in a similar sort of way of thinking?
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    Very good points and I didn't know that not many people register for the support. I read the university has like a pot of money, so I thought that the money should be spent on those who may need a lot of support and adjustments to allow them to study.

    I was thinking about my appointments as well, I go to a few pretty often (got one next week actually), but they only take up a 1-3 hours of my day, kind of like my job so it wouldn't be too difficult to work around.

    I can apply later on in my study though if I wish and if I feel it may benefit me, so I may do that. However, I feel that my tutor being aware of my conditions would be the most helpful for me. They may even encourage me to apply for DSA!
    DSA does not come from the University. It is funded through student finance, which is an agency of the state.:ninja:

    But your study is still impacted on by your disability compared to your able-bodied peers.:sadnod:

    The disability support service at your uni will probably encourage you to anyway.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)

    Because I am (partially) deaf from birth, I don't understand how deaf actually am, because I don't know any different. I am guessing you are in a similar sort of way of thinking?
    It's like that with my vision. Minus going colourblind as a teenager, (I'm hoping it's finally stopped getting worse, although, I've heard that some people with my condition go completely colourblind) it's what I've always seen.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    It's like that with my vision. Minus going colourblind as a teenager, (I'm hoping it's finally stopped getting worse, although, I've heard that some people with my condition go completely colourblind) it's what I've always seen.
    I've never heard of going completely colour-blind. It's a genetic condition so biologically, it shouldn't get worse?:confused:
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    Yes this thread is really going.:dance:
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    I've never heard of going completely colour-blind. It's a genetic condition so biologically, it shouldn't get worse?:confused:
    Mine is to do with the problems I've got with my eyes, rather than being a genetic problem.
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    Yes, I have always had problems so this is normal for me. I started physio when I was 9 and have been in and out of it ever since. Only recently I learn that being in pain from walking wasn't normal for people and neither was my level of tiredness. I even asked my coworkers and family and they looked at me oddly or laughed at it like it was such a weird question. I only realised something was different when I was 16 and I'm still learning about it now.

    A doctor kept saying I'm mild. Mild this, mild that, people have it worse than you. I told this to a new doctor I'm seeing and she interrupted and said "Well it's not mild if you're having these symptoms." And it really opened my eyes!

    (Original post by 04MR17)
    :rofl: Thanks.:giggle:
    I don't normally think of myself as disabled. I don't every day think "oh what if I could hear properly". It all depends on the person and their perception of their own condition(s).

    My advice would always to be apply.

    Because I am (partially) deaf from birth, I don't understand how deaf actually am, because I don't know any different. I am guessing you are in a similar sort of way of thinking?
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Mine is to do with the problems I've got with my eyes, rather than being a genetic problem.
    Having just researched, I didn't know this. Very interesting.:beard:
 
 
 
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