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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    It's a male chaffinch. I can identify most British birds (excludes vagrants). Go on somebody test me.
    What might this creature be?

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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    It's a male chaffinch. I can identify most British birds (excludes vagrants). Go on somebody test me.
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    (Original post by Hawksteinman)
    Knowing the name of the bird tells you nothing about it.

    If there were two people, which of the following knows the bird more?

    Person 1: Knows the bird's name in English, Spanish, French, Italian, and Latin.

    Person 2: Does not know the bird's name in any language, but knows its behaviour patterns, how it hunts, and can recognise its call.
    If Person 2 knows the birds behavioural pattern of said bird, how it hunts and what it sounds like I should think they'd also know what it's called.
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    (Original post by (づ ̄ ³ ̄)づ)
    If Person 2 knows the birds behavioural pattern of said bird, how it hunts and what it sounds like I should think they'd also know what it's called.
    No. They studied the bird by watching it, never bothering to learn its name. Person 1 just saw picture and learnt its name.
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    What might this creature be?

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    Female pheasant - however wrong markings for the British kind

    (Original post by the bear)
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    That's not british (meaning only found here by mistake) - a rare vagrant warbler maybe? North American?
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    (Original post by Hawksteinman)
    Knowing the name of the bird tells you nothing about it.

    If there were two people, which of the following knows the bird more?

    Person 1: Knows the bird's name in English, Spanish, French, Italian, and Latin.

    Person 2: Does not know the bird's name in any language, but knows its behaviour patterns, how it hunts, and can recognise its call.

    hmmmm i am not convinced that the 81% who did not know the name are intimately familiar with the behaviour & vocalisations of Fringilla coelebs

    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by cloudyeyes)
    chaffinch, cant think of many reasons why somebody would need to identify a bird like that.
    They're a common bird in the British countryside and you'll even see them in your gardens. People should be able to at least identify them.

    If more and more people grow up completely ignorant of nature, then that means fewer people in the future will be willing to stand up for it. According to the article I saw, conservation organisations are worried that their campaigns are being affected and made more difficult precisely because large numbers of people are disconnected from nature and the countryside.

    The part about people not being to even identify an oak tree is just ridiculous.
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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    Female pheasant - however wrong markings for the British kind
    The Lady Amherst Pheasant, non native and quite rare, but can still be seen if you are lucky.
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    (Original post by Hawksteinman)
    No. They studied the bird by watching it, never bothering to learn its name. Person 1 just saw picture and learnt its name.
    But who would study an animals traits without learning it's name?
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    (Original post by the bear)
    hmmmm i am not convinced that the 81% who did not know the name are intimately familiar with the behaviour & vocalisations of Fringilla coelebs

    :rolleyes:
    I'd agree with you. Behaviour, sound and appearance all are part of identifying a particular animal. I can't just know all this stuff without a name - I can't just say "look its the bird that lays 4-6 eggs per brood" or whatever. so yeah
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    The Lady Amherst Pheasant, non native and quite rare, but can still be seen if you are lucky.
    You got me there. If you showed the male I would of got it, darn. They are very localised, meaning if you are found in literally the forest where they have been released and sustained a population, then you'll see one.
    Now I look like a bit of an idiot, but test me again.
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    What might this creature be?

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    the photographer is Jean-Claude Jamoulle... the bird has a prissy European look to it... not like our robust no-nonsense Brexit pheasants....

    i will go with Phaisanus ranae
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    (Original post by the bear)
    clearly you have never seen tits
    not for a while....I'm married.
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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    You got me there. If you showed the male I would of got it, darn. They are very localised, meaning if you are found in literally the forest where they have been released and sustained a population, then you'll see one.
    Now I look like a bit of an idiot, but test me again.
    http://www.surfbirds.com/community-b...igo1/22926.jpg
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    (Original post by the bear)
    the photographer is Jean-Claude Jamoulle... the bird has a prissy European look to it... not like our robust no-nonsense Brexit pheasants....

    i will go with Phaisanus ranae
    I just gone and looked up the bird you showed me and I was right. It's the black and white warbler which is native to America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-and-white_warbler
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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    I just gone and looked up the bird you showed me and I was right. It's the black and white warbler which is native to America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-and-white_warbler
    it does not feel comfortable over there ... it has decided that Brexit Britain is its new homeland
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    (Original post by the bear)
    the photographer is Jean-Claude Jamoulle... the bird has a prissy European look to it... not like our robust no-nonsense Brexit pheasants....

    i will go with Phaisanus ranae
    No my darling, it is native to Myanmar (formerly Burma) but populated Lady Amherst's estate in the early 1900's where they can still be found today.

    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    You got me there. If you showed the male I would of got it, darn. They are very localised, meaning if you are found in literally the forest where they have been released and sustained a population, then you'll see one. Now I look like a bit of an idiot, but test me again.
    Strangely enough the only reason I know of them is because I happened across one in Herefordshire not all that long ago and it was a bird I had never seen before.

    That is the only actual rare species I know of most others like Red Kites should be common knowledge.
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    (Original post by ParentalAdvisory)
    not for a while....I'm married.

    :congrats:

    Well Played Sir !!

    :borat:
 
 
 
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