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Can you identify Nature ? Watch

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    (Original post by AngryJellyfish)
    Attachment 676446


    ermm please tell us that the big bird is helping the little bird :emo:
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    Well, let's see.

    *looks out my window*

    Yup, that's nature all right.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    ermm please tell us that the big bird is helping the little bird :emo:
    Be kind to our web-footed friends
    For that duck might be somebody's mother
    You may think that this is the end
    Well it is
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    (Original post by the bear)
    ermm please tell us that the big bird is helping the little bird :emo:
    Just moving it out of the way. :yes:

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    (Original post by AngryJellyfish)
    Just moving it out of the way. :yes:

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    http://m.memegen.com/hu2ul0.jpg
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    (Original post by AngryJellyfish)
    Just moving it out of the way. :yes:
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    (Original post by (づ ̄ ³ ̄)づ)
    But who would study an animals traits without learning it's name?
    It's just an example to show that one need not know the name to understand it. A kind of thought experiment.


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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    No my darling, it is native to Myanmar (formerly Burma) but populated Lady Amherst's estate in the early 1900's where they can still be found today.



    Strangely enough the only reason I know of them is because I happened across one in Herefordshire not all that long ago and it was a bird I had never seen before.

    That is the only actual rare species I know of most others like Red Kites should be common knowledge.
    Here's a map, which I believe is Hertfordshire/Bedfordshire:
    https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wi...erstspheasant/

    I live in Surrey, so they're not on my radar. Red kites are becoming very common where I live recently.
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    Ontopic: during my first year of university (over a decade ago now :moon: ), studying Environmental Science, I had to pass a test on local birds. I knew 4 or 5 beforehand (which is probably about all I remember these days too, having not used the knowledge in all these years), but we had to learn approx. 20 or 30. I passed with 100%, but the guy sat next to me failed. He literally couldn't even identify a robin. :no:
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    Red-throated diver? Sorry about late reply, just had lunch
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    (Original post by Hawksteinman)
    It's just an example to show that one need not know the name to understand it. A kind of thought experiment.

    A Platycercus by any other name would smell as sweet...
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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    Here's a map, which I believe is Hertfordshire/Bedfordshire:
    https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wi...erstspheasant/

    I live in Surrey, so they're not on my radar. Red kites are becoming very common where I live recently.
    Hertfordshire is quite a distance from Herefordshire.
    They shouldn't be on my radar.

    Red Kites were not uncommon in my area but thanks to the breeding programs they are becoming much more common nationally.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    A Platycercus by any other name would smell as sweet...
    Precisely. One could come up with one's own name for it. A name means nothing, it is merely used to distinguish between different things.


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    (Original post by AngryJellyfish)
    Ontopic: during my first year of university (over a decade ago now :moon: ), studying Environmental Science, I had to pass a test on local birds. I knew 4 or 5 beforehand (which is probably about all I remember these days too, having not used the knowledge in all these years), but we had to learn approx. 20 or 30. I passed with 100%, but the guy sat next to me failed. He literally couldn't even identify a robin. :no:
    you must have been well choughed :teehee:
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    (Original post by the bear)
    you must have been well choughed :teehee:
    I see what you did there.
    http://www.bowdlers.com/wpimages/wpa806e3db_05_06.jpg
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    It's a British bulldog I think
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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    I see what you did there.
    http://www.bowdlers.com/wpimages/wpa806e3db_05_06.jpg
    don't crow about it :toofunny:
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    Hertfordshire is quite a distance from Herefordshire.
    They shouldn't be on my radar.

    Red Kites were not uncommon in my area but thanks to the breeding programs they are becoming much more common nationally.
    Oh yeah, sorry I got mixed up a between hertford/Hereford. The one you saw (if you only saw one?) is likely to be a single escapee. Last summer, I had a cockatiel coming to our garden - however I wouldn't consider it a British bird.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    don't crow about it :toofunny:

    looks like you're on a roll-er
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    (Original post by Tuffyandtab)
    Oh yeah, sorry I got mixed up a between hertford/Hereford. The one you saw (if you only saw one?) is likely to be a single escapee. Last summer, I had a cockatiel coming to our garden - however I wouldn't consider it a British bird.
    Just one female, not sure where she would have come from though.

    My general feeling if they aren't recognised by the RSPB they aren't "British" birds.
 
 
 
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