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    I've been applying for thousands of jobs for the past year and a bit . Graduate jobs, retail jobs, office jobs, restaurants,call centre jobs etc but I am never successful. I have got a few interviews but never further than that. I just ****ing give up.
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    What's your educational and work experience background?
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    (Original post by jpow)
    What's your educational and work experience background?
    Hons degree in Mathematics and Economics.Have experience working part time in call centres and retail. Did internship with hmrc and worked/volunteered abroad.
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    So it is probably how you conducted yourself at the interview.
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    How often do you get through the application process?

    From the top of your head can you give me an example of communication, team work, leadership, problem solving and resilience?
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    (Original post by xdcrfgv)
    Hons degree in Mathematics and Economics.Have experience working part time in call centres and retail. Did internship with hmrc and worked/volunteered abroad.
    have you ever applied to HMRC? If it's a competency based application of suggest running it through a current civil servant. It could just be that you don't know how to sell what you have
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    OP is basically me... I am hard-working, sensible and kind; what more do you wantttttt
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    If you are consistently being unsuccessful, including after interview, you may want to a) brush up your interview skills and b) evaluate your CV and see if it's presenting yourself in the best way possible - both by formatting and by what you have and haven't included on there. Most customer service and retail jobs are pretty uninterested in academic qualifications so much as being willing and able to work in a team based environment to tight performance metrics. Coming across as generally amiable is a pretty good start on this, although being able to give specific examples of working in a team/group (which may be academically), working to deadlines/specific targets, and for customer service, giving bad news (which seems absurd but it's something they like to see often, depending on the nature of the role).

    Grad jobs are a bit harder to take steps like this for as while those general principles may help you in interview, just getting an interview, and even after interview, requires a good deal of luck. They use pretty arbitrary metrics to filter applications and if you fall under one of those then there's usually not a great deal you can do to change it (e.g. degree classification) and so you just need to continue applying until you apply to one that doesn't use that specific filtering method.
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    (Original post by xdcrfgv)
    I've been applying for thousands of jobs for the past year and a bit . Graduate jobs, retail jobs, office jobs, restaurants,call centre jobs etc but I am never successful. I have got a few interviews but never further than that. I just ****ing give up.
    The frustrating answer is you are probably applying to jobs too broadly if you have applied to thousands. You probably need to focus your efforts on a slightly more narrow set of jobs.

    What feedback are you getting from your interviews?
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    (Original post by xdcrfgv)
    Hons degree in Mathematics and Economics.Have experience working part time in call centres and retail. Did internship with hmrc and worked/volunteered abroad.
    Please tell me you're serious?
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    (Original post by Skyewoods)
    How often do you get through the application process?

    From the top of your head can you give me an example of communication, team work, leadership, problem solving and resilience?
    I have been getting interviews every few months while applying to lots of jobs. So not good at all.

    I could give you a few examples of those if I was writing them out on an application and had time to think. However, at a competency based interview I have to think long and hard about my answer.
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    have you ever applied to HMRC? If it's a competency based application of suggest running it through a current civil servant. It could just be that you don't know how to sell what you have
    Did apply last year but I was unsuccessful. I will try again this year.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    If you are consistently being unsuccessful, including after interview, you may want to a) brush up your interview skills and b) evaluate your CV and see if it's presenting yourself in the best way possible - both by formatting and by what you have and haven't included on there. Most customer service and retail jobs are pretty uninterested in academic qualifications so much as being willing and able to work in a team based environment to tight performance metrics. Coming across as generally amiable is a pretty good start on this, although being able to give specific examples of working in a team/group (which may be academically), working to deadlines/specific targets, and for customer service, giving bad news (which seems absurd but it's something they like to see often, depending on the nature of the role).
    Yeah I was thinking about this but there really isn't much more that I can say on my work experience on my cv without rambling.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    The frustrating answer is you are probably applying to jobs too broadly if you have applied to thousands. You probably need to focus your efforts on a slightly more narrow set of jobs.

    What feedback are you getting from your interviews?
    Not answering the questions fully.
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    Please tell me you're serious?
    I am serious.
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    Ok - this isn't surprising.

    Are you really applying to jobs because you want them/will enjoy them, or just applying to everything you can through desperation of any job?

    If the latter this will come across both in applications and interview. At an application stage you need to sell the why you are going to stick at the job, even if it is retail/part-time type jobs. No one wants to recruit you for you to be be a high risk of leaving soon afterwards for a "better" job or not being truly motivated because to you it is "just a job".

    Work out what you want to do first and focus on those applications. Invest time into researching the role and the company. As a Maths and Econ grad, your abilities will be sought after if you have the soft skills to back it up, and the motivation to do the job well.
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    You are overqualified for the non skilled jobs and have no experience for grad jobs.
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    (Original post by xdcrfgv)
    I've been applying for thousands of jobs for the past year and a bit . Graduate jobs, retail jobs, office jobs, restaurants,call centre jobs etc but I am never successful. I have got a few interviews but never further than that. I just ****ing give up.
    I think your watchword needs to be 'focus' - rather than just applying for everything, pick the jobs you are going to apply for carefully, with a close eye on the person specification and whether you meet it. With very rare exceptions, there is no point in applying for a job if you don't meet the essential criteria on the person specification. All you do is make the recruiter's job very easy when it comes to short-listing, while at the same time demoralising yourself when yet another application fails.

    A common problem is failing to redo your CV for each application - employers will spot it a mile off if you just send out a standard version, and take it to mean that you aren't really that interested in the job, even that perhaps you are just going through the motions in order to be able to keep claiming your JSA. Especially if you don't have the option to write a supporting statement - which needs to pick off the person specification point by point with evidence of how you meet it - you must make sure that the employer can see straight away from the CV whether you meet their core criteria or not. Let's suppose that the person specification says "experience of dealing with customer queries": you don't just put "I have..." with a direct copy of what's in the spec. Instead, you write "When I worked for [company] I spent [ insert number of months or years] [insert relevant detail of what you did]. From this experience, I learned....." Keep it concise (lengthy supporting statements are a pain and don't help your cause at all), and make the recruiter your friend by following the person specification in a systematic way so that they can easily compare you with other applicants. The easier you make it for the recruiter, the more likely you are to get on to that short list.

    When it comes to your lack of success at interviews, you need to get as much feedback as you can, but if they won't give it to you or the opportunity has passed, think about things from the interviewers' perspective. Essentially, they are asking themselves three questions: Can this person do the job (ie, do they have the knowledge, skills, and experience I need them to have)? Would they do the job (ie, how motivated are they to do this particular job and do it well)? and "Will they fit in (and be able to work effectively with the team I already have)?". Interviewers want concise, clear, answers to their questions, not rambling, stream of consciousness stuff (trust me, I've seen it). They'll also want to see that you have researched their company/sector and are showing an intelligent interest in it.

    The other thing I'd want to know if I was interviewing you is what you are/have been doing with your time while you aren't in paid employment, and what you've gained from it. This is not the time for "this is the 1000th job I've applied for" but rather "I have been volunteering with XXX doing YYY because ZZZ".
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    I think your watchword needs to be 'focus' - rather than just applying for everything, pick the jobs you are going to apply for carefully, with a close eye on the person specification and whether you meet it. With very rare exceptions, there is no point in applying for a job if you don't meet the essential criteria on the person specification. All you do is make the recruiter's job very easy when it comes to short-listing, while at the same time demoralising yourself when yet another application fails.

    A common problem is failing to redo your CV for each application - employers will spot it a mile off if you just send out a standard version, and take it to mean that you aren't really that interested in the job, even that perhaps you are just going through the motions in order to be able to keep claiming your JSA. Especially if you don't have the option to write a supporting statement - which needs to pick off the person specification point by point with evidence of how you meet it - you must make sure that the employer can see straight away from the CV whether you meet their core criteria or not. Let's suppose that the person specification says "experience of dealing with customer queries": you don't just put "I have..." with a direct copy of what's in the spec. Instead, you write "When I worked for [company] I spent [ insert number of months or years] [insert relevant detail of what you did]. From this experience, I learned....." Keep it concise (lengthy supporting statements are a pain and don't help your cause at all), and make the recruiter your friend by following the person specification in a systematic way so that they can easily compare you with other applicants. The easier you make it for the recruiter, the more likely you are to get on to that short list.

    When it comes to your lack of success at interviews, you need to get as much feedback as you can, but if they won't give it to you or the opportunity has passed, think about things from the interviewers' perspective. Essentially, they are asking themselves three questions: Can this person do the job (ie, do they have the knowledge, skills, and experience I need them to have)? Would they do the job (ie, how motivated are they to do this particular job and do it well)? and "Will they fit in (and be able to work effectively with the team I already have)?". Interviewers want concise, clear, answers to their questions, not rambling, stream of consciousness stuff (trust me, I've seen it). They'll also want to see that you have researched their company/sector and are showing an intelligent interest in it.

    The other thing I'd want to know if I was interviewing you is what you are/have been doing with your time while you aren't in paid employment, and what you've gained from it. This is not the time for "this is the 1000th job I've applied for" but rather "I have been volunteering with XXX doing YYY because ZZZ".
    Wowwwwwww, how can you write all that in one sitting?? ))
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    (Original post by xdcrfgv)
    I've been applying for thousands of jobs for the past year and a bit . Graduate jobs, retail jobs, office jobs, restaurants,call centre jobs etc but I am never successful. I have got a few interviews but never further than that. I just ****ing give up.
    Literally thousands? what did u get in your degree?
 
 
 
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