Is it worth Applying to 5 year Grad Entry Medicine if your not from a rich background

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quasa
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OK, so as many of you may/ may not know, I am a pharmacist who is looking togo into medicine. What a lot of you however wont know is that I was actually offered a deferred entry to a 4 year programme at an unspecified top 10 Russell group uni (for reasons of IRL confidentiality ie exposing my ID, I will not disclose which one and which year) only for 4 year course to no longer exist at that uni.

I am considering a lot of 4 year unis but feel that 5 year undergrad courses seem more interesting. From what I gather however is that there is virtually no financial aid for 5 year undergrad Medicine if your a graduate and want to confirm if this applies for both the 5 year undergrad and grad courses for 2018 start date or not
and if it would be worth pursuing the 5 year courses if your not from a rich background.

Help much obliged.

quasa
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Blue_Cow
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Undergraduate Medicine (i.e. the standard 5-year MBBS or the 6-year MBBS/BSc course) is not funded by Student Finance as it is classed as a second degree. Basically, you won't qualify for a tuition fee loan.

However, with Graduate Medicine, you are able to get a loan.
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quasa
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Undergraduate Medicine (i.e. the standard 5-year MBBS or the 6-year MBBS/BSc course) is not funded by Student Finance as it is classed as a second degree. Basically, you won't qualify for a tuition fee loan.

However, with Graduate Medicine, you are able to get a loan.
4 year course I know is the case. question is does it also apply for the 5 year GEM course (source links as well if possible).

also re: undergrad, would you still be entitled to maintenance and (non NHS) bursaries if you have another degree or not (I guess the latter would be per uni basis but it would be interesting to know).
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games211
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(Original post by quasa)
4 year course I know is the case. question is does it also apply for the 5 year GEM course (source links as well if possible).

also re: undergrad, would you still be entitled to maintenance and (non NHS) bursaries if you have another degree or not (I guess the latter would be per uni basis but it would be interesting to know).
As a graduate, If you decided to apply for the 5-year course, student finance won't offer you much, just a maintenance loan. BUT, your university can offer you bursaries and often pay for your accommodation in clinical years.
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quasa
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(Original post by games211)
As a graduate, If you decided to apply for the 5-year course, student finance won't offer you much, just a maintenance loan. BUT, your university can offer you bursaries and often pay for your accommodation in clinical years.
just to confirm, 5 year undergrad or 5 year grad entry (or both)
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by quasa)
4 year course I know is the case. question is does it also apply for the 5 year GEM course (source links as well if possible).

also re: undergrad, would you still be entitled to maintenance and (non NHS) bursaries if you have another degree or not (I guess the latter would be per uni basis but it would be interesting to know).
I've never heard of a 5 year GEM course. That seems to defeat the purpose of GEM as it is seen to be an "accelerated" course. Do you have a link? I'd be interested as GEM has been in the back of my mind before.

I did a bit of googling, and here is the EXACT wording from this thread (https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=3909423) by Mark Lee who is an SFE Advisor

"Hi again

An medicne degree student starting as an undergraduate with a previous degrees funding is as follows: The student is entitled to full maintenance loan but no fees or grant for duration of the course due to the equivalent level qualification. The student should apply on a PN1 (new student app) as normal. This is for years 1-4.

If you are studying a standard 5th year: The student is entitled to reduced rate maintenance loan only and no grants due to NHS bursary. Fees will be paid by NHS The student should apply on a PR1 (returning student app).

I'm sorry this was not made clear to you, the medicine courses have a few different exceptions based on the circumstances and are not as straight forward. If you would like us to go through this again, please call back.

Thanks"
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games211
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(Original post by quasa)
just to confirm, 5 year undergrad or 5 year grad entry (or both)
A graduate who enters the 5-year undergrad course

There are no 5-year GEM courses ( Edit: Imperial started a 5-Year grad course in 2014, credit to @quasa )
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quasa
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(Original post by games211)
A graduate who enters the 5-year undergrad course

There are no 5-year GEM courses.
Imperial does 5 since 2015. a lot have scrapped the 4 year course and making students to the undergrad course
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games211
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(Original post by quasa)
Imperial does 5 since 2015. a lot have scrapped the 4 year course and making students to the undergrad course
Oh sorry, my bad!! Thanks for letting me know Very weird that they do that,hmm..But, it would still be considered as a graduate course not an undergrad course.
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quasa
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(Original post by games211)
Oh sorry, my bad!! Thanks for letting me know Very weird,hmm..
in fact a few unis which did the 5 year grad course scrapped them due to not enough applicants (ie too expensive for prospective students) upon looking at the 2018 GEM schools vs the ones I looked at in 16 & 17 entry
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quasa
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/...raduate-entry/
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by games211)
Oh sorry, my bad!! Thanks for letting me know Very weird that they do that,hmm..But, it would still be considered as a graduate course not an undergrad course.
Actually Imperial's 5 year GEM course is the only GEM course (that I'm aware of) which you have to fully self-fund yourself. They do it because student's complained it was too much to do everything in four years (if I'm correct, it was the first/second years that were an issue).
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games211
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
Actually Imperial's 5 year GEM course is the only GEM course (that I'm aware of) which you have to fully self-fund yourself. They do it because student's complained it was too much to do everything in four years (if I'm correct, it was the first/second years that were an issue).
That's erm interesting...
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by games211)
That's erm interesting...
Which bit lol?
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quasa
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
Which bit lol?
imp being the only 1 offering 5 year undergrad i think tbh (although I am not him so I cant confirm or speak on his behalf tbh)
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quasa
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
Actually Imperial's 5 year GEM course is the only GEM course (that I'm aware of) which you have to fully self-fund yourself. They do it because student's complained it was too much to do everything in four years (if I'm correct, it was the first/second years that were an issue).
Not exactly, essentially something to do with EU minimum required clinical placement time and imperial felt after student feedback they werent getting enough clinical experience in hospital or GPs during 1st 2 years due to the workload.
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by games211)
That's erm interesting...
https://www.bma.org.uk/connecting-do...cus/f/51/t/293
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by quasa)
Not exactly, essentially something to do with EU minimum required clinical placement time and imperial felt after student feedback they werent getting enough clinical experience in hospital or GPs during 1st 2 years due to the workload.
Close enough lol. I think this also kinda sums it up https://www.bma.org.uk/connecting-do...cus/f/51/t/293
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quasa
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
Close enough lol. I think this also kinda sums it up https://www.bma.org.uk/connecting-do...cus/f/51/t/293
I was summing that article up :lol:
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by quasa)
I was summing that article up :lol:
As you can tell, I read the title and went straight to the comments. It's a bad habit I have after being exposed to Daily Mail articles
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