Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Should I celebrate Christmas as an atheist? Watch

Announcements
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    Do your friends feel forced to celebrate even though it's not part of their religion?



    What you did there, I see it.

    In all seriousness, however, in the same sort of when-you're-trying-to-sleep or when-you're-in-the-shower thoughts, I also wonder whether as a country we should be forcing our religion on visitors as you mentioned above. Obviously religion is ingrained in the way this country works, but should it still be when so many religions live alongside one another, and an increasing number of people are not religious? Is it a sort of war of religions perhaps?



    I could take your piss, but that might mean breaking into your house. Also, I don't really want to touch it. Sorry.

    Or is it someone else's?
    No no it's my piss. I can deliver it to you for Christmas. I'll deliver 1st class signed for.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by apeshit007)
    Are you truly taking THE PISS.
    You don't belive in GOD but you wanna celebrate Christmas?
    SHAME ON YOU! SHAME!
    Which particular aspect of a typical British Christmas is religious?
    Why wouldn't you want people to spend time with their families and exchange gifts? Seems like a nice thing to do to me.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by apeshit007)
    No no it's my piss. I can deliver it to you for Christmas. I'll deliver 1st class signed for.
    Ah, thank you! So long as it's well sealed.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    So I guess it can be seen as respectful another religion by taking part and wanting to learn more about their celebrations.
    Sure, but even if that isn't your intention just ask yourself: 'is my eating of this turkey on the anniversary of the birth of a man I don't believe existed actually hurting anyone?'

    (psst, the answer is no)
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    A new proposition: is it worse for me to participate in a celebration I don't believe in, or to disappoint those around me for refusing to participate?
    Depends on how much grief refusing to participate would bring you. Sometimes with things like this it's just better for you to grit your teeth and get on with it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SCIENCE :D)
    Christmas not really a religious celebration anymore though is it.
    True. In which case are all of us who changed its meaning disrespectful of its religious prominence? Should we be allowed to celebrate it without paying attention to its origins?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I would "celebrate" Christmas just like any other day, really. It isn't special to me and it won't be special to the kids (if I do have any I will tell them not to believe what their teachers indoctrinate them at school).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wanderlust96)
    Sure, but even if that isn't your intention just ask yourself: 'is my eating of this turkey on the anniversary of the birth of a man I don't believe existed actually hurting anyone?'

    (psst, the answer is no)
    Oooo but what if i ate the turkey on a different day? 😱
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    I would "celebrate" Christmas just like any other day, really. It isn't special to me and it won't be special to the kids (if I do have any I will tell them not to believe what their teachers indoctrinate them at school).
    Were you brought up to celebrate it, or do those around you not celebrate either? Personally I think your approach is the most logical here! But I'm not sure what my friends and family would think of me if I did the same.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    In all honesty, christmas has evolved so it is no longer very religious and you will find all religions celebrating it. I personally celebrate it for the tradition and i am one of the most millitant atheists around.Christmas was originally a pagan festival anyway so christians shouldn't be celebrating it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Charliewiz)
    In all honesty, christmas has evolved so it is no longer very religious and you will find all religions celebrating it. I personally celebrate it for the tradition and i am one of the most millitant atheists around.Christmas was originally a pagan festival anyway so christians shouldn't be celebrating it.
    I like that last point... so can we ever call it Christmas if we don't know where it came from? Because I didn't until a couple of people mentioned pagans in this thread! 😂
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    Were you brought up to celebrate it, or do those around you not celebrate either? Personally I think your approach is the most logical here! But I'm not sure what my friends and family would think of me if I did the same.
    I was pretty much brought up with it (nativity plays in primary school, "carol service" in secondary school - and I'm not religious). Uni and beyond, all that I really had to do was be with my family to visit or host other distant relatives. Oh, and the presents. My parents insisted I buy presents for them and my siblings. Yet they never tell me what they want.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    I was pretty much brought up with it (nativity plays in primary school, "carol service" in secondary school - and I'm not religious). Uni and beyond, all that I really had to do was be with my family to visit or host other distant relatives. Oh, and the presents. My parents insisted I buy presents for them and my siblings. Yet they never tell me what they want.
    I know what you mean! I hate buying gifts! It's to hard to work out what to buy, and I only buy them because I know I'm expected to. People give to receive these days which I think is disrespectful in itself!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    I like that last point... so can we ever call it Christmas if we don't know where it came from? Because I didn't until a couple of people mentioned pagans in this thread! 😂
    Yep. It was originally a winter solstice pagan festival and the leaders of christianity wanted to expand the religion so they took over the festival and shoved jesus into it, so the people that wanted to celebrate it just moved to christianity. The bible hints that jesus was even born in summer rather than winter.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    I know it's completely the wrong time of year, but my brain came across this in the depths of the shower and I couldn't not ask.

    Should I be celebrating Christmas as a non-Christian?

    I haven't been Christened, but England practises Christianity and my family and friends expect me to practise certain aspects with them. Namely, Christmas. The shops force it upon us, we are expected to give and receive gifts (to the point where it's a competition rather than a luxury). I decorate a Christmas tree, eat a turkey dinner and pull crackers.

    What do you think?
    Richard Dawkins celebrates Christmas but thinks it too materialistic. He likes traditional carols and detests those Christmas songs that contain no mention of religion.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    I know it's completely the wrong time of year, but my brain came across this in the depths of the shower and I couldn't not ask.

    Should I be celebrating Christmas as a non-Christian?

    I haven't been Christened, but England practises Christianity and my family and friends expect me to practise certain aspects with them. Namely, Christmas. The shops force it upon us, we are expected to give and receive gifts (to the point where it's a competition rather than a luxury). I decorate a Christmas tree, eat a turkey dinner and pull crackers.

    What do you think?
    Chill out, enjoy the party and tell yourself you're marking the turn of the year - as all cultures do.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by carrotstar)
    Oooo but what if i ate the turkey on a different day? 😱
    That would be unforgivable
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I don't, and nor does my family (which probably makes it easier for me not to), but it's not purely because we aren't religious. We don't really buy in to any of those big holidays so pretty much ignore them - we pretty much stick to just birthdays, although we go all out on those i think it's a personal call, to be honest. There are ways to celebrate christmas without making it a religious event and instead focusing on the family & community aspects of the holiday, but at the same time you could theoretically do that on any day of the year because the reason for it being the 25th of december doesn't apply to you. If you WANT to enjoy certain parts of christmas then go for it, I say, but you don't necessarily have to 'celebrate christmas' to wear ugly jumpers and give gifts to your family & friends
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Wow, The christian love thy neighbor attitude is pretty much absent in this thread.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    The overarching question is how exactly should Christmas be celebrated? And why.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 26, 2017
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.