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Should I celebrate Christmas as an atheist? Watch

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    (Original post by carrotstar)
    Oooo but what if i ate the turkey on a different day? 😱
    That would involve a great deal of trouble for those charged with organising the referendum that enables turkeys to have a say in the celebrations. They must have their vote.

    Unless you are actually a Christian and go to church or chapel (and very, very few Britons really are) then the major aspects of Christmas in twenty-first century British culture are:

    A decorated tree - no religious aspect

    The giving of presents - which may mark the giving of gifts by mythical pagans to a Jewish baby at a mythical birth event in a pagan Roman province, who even they thought would grow up to be a great political ruler - no religious significance

    (Remember, the real Jesus, if he existed, was born, according to the stories, at a time of year other than December, in a land far, far away, during a historically non-existent travelling census during the reign of a provincial king who had died years previously)

    Decorating the home - no religious connotations

    The gathering of families in winter - no religious connotations, but plenty of social ones

    Hankering after non-existent snow - no religious connotations

    Watching a lot of television - no religious aspects at all

    Eating lots of food, especially poultry - nothing religious to see here


    So, enjoy the social aspects of what is, in fact, an important part of the retail economy, and forget religion.
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    (Original post by carrotstar)
    I know it's completely the wrong time of year, but my brain came across this in the depths of the shower and I couldn't not ask.

    Should I be celebrating Christmas as a non-Christian?

    I haven't been Christened, but England practises Christianity and my family and friends expect me to practise certain aspects with them. Namely, Christmas. The shops force it upon us, we are expected to give and receive gifts (to the point where it's a competition rather than a luxury). I decorate a Christmas tree, eat a turkey dinner and pull crackers.

    What do you think?
    My whole family is Atheist and we have always celebrated Christmas. However, not in a religious way. We have a tree, decorate the house, give presents, eat lots of food, have family round and listen to music and watch films. It's my absolute favourite time of year. Always going to happen and it's the one time of year that you can rely upon. It's so special in this house. Not for religious aspects, but for warm, magical family time. Snuggling up watching films and eating chocolate. Why not celebrate it. You don't have to celebrate the religious part or get sucked into the commercialism of it all but just spending time with family, friends, eating lots of food, watching films, tree decorating whilst listening to music and getting drunk. It's amazing.
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    As a Christian, Christmas is not even a proper Christian holiday, it's very secular and commercialised.
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    OF course lol everybody celebrates christmas, im sikh and celebrate it with my family like the rest of the country. Just dont go to church if you dont want to ... or then again theres no harm in going to church as well upto you....
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    (Original post by carrotstar)
    I know it's completely the wrong time of year, but my brain came across this in the depths of the shower and I couldn't not ask.

    Should I be celebrating Christmas as a non-Christian?

    I haven't been Christened, but England practises Christianity and my family and friends expect me to practise certain aspects with them. Namely, Christmas. The shops force it upon us, we are expected to give and receive gifts (to the point where it's a competition rather than a luxury). I decorate a Christmas tree, eat a turkey dinner and pull crackers.

    What do you think?
    I'm a Christian and say definitely YES. Jesus loved a celebration, after all he was at a wedding feast when he performed his first miracle, turning water into wine.

    God isn't a kill joy, celebrate and enjoy the season and if you can, pop along to midnight mass on Christmas eve.
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    (Original post by carrotstar)
    I know it's completely the wrong time of year, but my brain came across this in the depths of the shower and I couldn't not ask.

    Should I be celebrating Christmas as a non-Christian?

    I haven't been Christened, but England practises Christianity and my family and friends expect me to practise certain aspects with them. Namely, Christmas. The shops force it upon us, we are expected to give and receive gifts (to the point where it's a competition rather than a luxury). I decorate a Christmas tree, eat a turkey dinner and pull crackers.

    What do you think?
    I've never really thought about this, but I definitely think it's good to shed some light on it. Shower thoughts do that to you by default.

    I think, as previously stated by other users, it's a cultural thing as well as a religious one. We still celebrate Halloween when in reality it's an ancient Pagan celebration of the spirits if I remember rightly.

    Keep celebrating Santa day, drink too much, stock up on pigs and blankets, you know the drill.
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    (Original post by Racoon)
    God isn't a kill joy
    I think the people of the cities of the plain might disagree with that view.
 
 
 
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