Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Is it really "old" to go to university in your 20's, how much does it affect your social life there, and does it affect how likely employers are to take you once you finish?
    Thank you.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    The oldest person to ever graduate with a degree was 95

    You're never too old. Besides, I know LOADS of people who go back to uni in their 20s (me included)
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Education isn't a race, no one cares how old you are. It only matters that you the drive to succeed and that you can prove that.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I'm nearly 70 and about to go into my 3rd year in September.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    I'm 24 and about to start a 4-year course in September.
    Definitely not too old! In fact, I don't think I'd have been able to hack it at 18. Having a few years to shake off the teenage naivety has put me in a much better position to make the most of the university experience!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thatsamecraig)
    I'm 24 and about to start a 4-year course in September.
    Definitely not too old! In fact, I don't think I'd have been able to hack it at 18. Having a few years to shake off the teenage naivety has put me in a much better position to make the most of the university experience!
    I feel exactly the same, no way would I have done this at 18, and I've discovered so much more about myself and how I learn since then. I totally don't regret leaving it until now. I'm doing a 4 year course too, and I plan on doing a PGCE after, so I won't be finished until I'm 30, and although it's a little daunting, I believe now is the right time.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Ok but do employers prefer to take young graduates? Does age hold you back, realistically?
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Come on over to Mature Students - it'll make you feel less old. I'm starting undergraduate degree in September at 27.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    Ok but do employers prefer to take young graduates? Does age hold you back, realistically?
    Hard to say. By the letter of the law, they shouldn't discriminate based on age. However, Im sure companies can find a way to hire or not hire particular people without explicitly stating so.

    When applying for grad schemes, companies really are looking for 'future leaders'. Graduates are an expensive investment. What they're hoping is that they've chosen the correct people, and they get a long period of service from them. Naturally, the younger you are, the more years you could potentially put in to that company. However, Im sure they also realise that employment can be quite transient. Its much rarer to stay in one company for your whole working career than it used to be.

    In my experience, being about to start my first grad job at 28, I don't think age has had any baring on the outcome of my applications. There are a whole list of points which are being examined during the application process - educational background, numeracy and literacy ability, technical knowledge, basic competencies, presentation ability, how you interact with managers, how you interact with other graduates etc etc. I really can't imagine that at any point Ive been completely equal with another candidate across all categories, but for my age, and lost out because of it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by josh_v)
    Hard to say. By the letter of the law, they shouldn't discriminate based on age. However, Im sure companies can find a way to hire or not hire particular people without explicitly stating so.

    When applying for grad schemes, companies really are looking for 'future leaders'. Graduates are an expensive investment. What they're hoping is that they've chosen the correct people, and they get a long period of service from them. Naturally, the younger you are, the more years you could potentially put in to that company. However, Im sure they also realise that employment can be quite transient. Its much rarer to stay in one company for your whole working career than it used to be.

    In my experience, being about to start my first grad job at 28, I don't think age has had any baring on the outcome of my applications. There are a whole list of points which are being examined during the application process - educational background, numeracy and literacy ability, technical knowledge, basic competencies, presentation ability, how you interact with managers, how you interact with other graduates etc etc. I really can't imagine that at any point Ive been completely equal with another candidate across all categories, but for my age, and lost out because of it.
    Are all jobs for graduates "graduate schemes"?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    Are all jobs for graduates "graduate schemes"?
    No. Graduate schemes are typically a predefined program that lasts for 2-3 years. As part of that, you may work across different departments and in different roles. Some graduate schemes will put you through a professional qualification as well.

    Alternatively you can apply for a job. This works just as a traditional job would.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by josh_v)
    ... What they're hoping is that they've chosen the correct people, and they get a long period of service from them. Naturally, the younger you are, the more years you could potentially put in to that company...
    In my experience as a former employer, older people are more likely to stay longer in the job as they are more likely to be in a settled way of life - a partner, kids, mortgage, etc. People in their early to mid twenties are much more likely to job hop. I've also found more mature employees are less likely to take sickies every Monday! In short, being a little older than the average graduate shouldn't give you any disadvantage.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.