Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Do we listen to the uninformed voter too much? Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Brexit is a cluster-****. Many have changed their minds since, but thought that they were right at the time - they were easily duped IMO. Not having to have a specific majority to launch a multi-year process has back-fired.

    Trump won, despite never having held public office, or shown any concern for anyone but himself. Simplistic policies, e.g. I'll build a wall, convinced some voters. Many are not happy with him now.

    Some people vote one way because they always have, not because they know and like the current policies of a particular party.

    How do we ensure that people take their voting responsibility seriously, and are informed before they vote?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    The best way to encourage a more informed vote would be by having politics lessons at school instead of shite like PHSE or Citizenship. Just replace them with non-biased politics i.e. how the voting system works, the roles of the houses etc. so people would at least know what they are voting FOR. but the tories would never allow that because they get a lot of their success from ignorance and fear.

    I think campaign honesty needs to be more seriously enforced. There should be punishment for lies, propaganda and misleading people... like the NHS bus from the Leave camp.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    The onus is on the governmental institution to provide such options as to allow the voters to make a choice of preference while still preserving the integrity of the country, not on the voter. The RNC allowed Trump to become their nominee due to petty infighting and then refusing to simply not field a candidate even though the alternative was worse. The Brexit referendum was brought in because the Conservative party lifted that policy from the UKIP manifesto in order to poach UKIPs voter base and win the election with a majority, which it could not do without such a promise. They then had to follow through on this, just as the RNC had to follow through with the Trump administration.

    It's an issue with power hungry political structures who do not have the best interests of their people and country at heart, not on "uninformed voters". The voters are deliberately left uninformed and misinformed by said political players (e.g. the entire Brexit campaign itself).
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    What about misinformed? What about IQ under 90?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Moura)
    The best way to encourage a more informed vote would be by having politics lessons at school instead of shite like PHSE or Citizenship. Just replace them with non-biased politics i.e. how the voting system works, the roles of the houses etc. so people would at least know what they are voting FOR. but the tories would never allow that because they get a lot of their success from ignorance and fear.

    I think campaign honesty needs to be more seriously enforced. There should be punishment for lies, propaganda and misleading people... like the NHS bus from the Leave camp.
    You do realise what you describe is exactly what your citizenship lessons are supposed to be teaching?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    You do realise what you describe is exactly what your citizenship lessons are supposed to be teaching?
    No I didn't realise that because they definitely weren't at my school, they were a load of BS and I'm sure a lot of people can relate.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    You do realise what you describe is exactly what your citizenship lessons are supposed to be teaching?
    Really?! Our school does **** all. eriously. We do cooking, Philosophy, Meditation, "Computer skills" (read- free period) and Sex Ed. Nothing about the government at all.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    The solution is to inform people properly then. The media is partly to blame and I'm not sure what regulations would be appropriate but they certainly do take sides. For example Corbyn had a very rough time and probably would have done even better in this most recent election if the media hadn't been so invested in destroying him to make stories to write about (then again, perhaps May wouldn't have called the election if Corbyn hadn't appeared so weak).

    Another example is Nick Griffin of the BNP. Whenever he was put on a platform with other politicians who could demolish his arguments with their own, the audience chosen by the broadcaster resorted to insulting him, booing and jeering instead, and the other politicians, once one had broken ranks, had to join in to appeal to the pantomime crowd. As a result, nobody is informed of the BNP except that Griffin pisses off the mainstream parties. It made 'entertaining' TV for viewers though, but not informative in the way it should be.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Moura)
    The best way to encourage a more informed vote would be by having politics lessons at school instead of shite like PHSE or Citizenship. Just replace them with non-biased politics i.e. how the voting system works, the roles of the houses etc. so people would at least know what they are voting FOR. but the tories would never allow that because they get a lot of their success from ignorance and fear.

    I think campaign honesty needs to be more seriously enforced. There should be punishment for lies, propaganda and misleading people... like the NHS bus from the Leave camp.
    Are you suggesting tories thrive off voters that are ignorant?
    Rubbish!
    The Conservative party gained votes from the highest social classes- including educated.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Justin.Reid2000)
    Are you suggesting tories thrive off voters that are ignorant?
    Rubbish!
    The Conservative party gained votes from the highest social classes- including educated.
    you think the "highest social classes" make up 43% of the UK? where I live is dominated by tories, it is a safe seat. people around here have money but they are not necessarily well educated (or if they were, it was a long time ago) and they make very ignorant comments.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Moura)
    you think the "highest social classes" make up 43% of the UK? where I live is dominated by tories, it is a safe seat. people around here have money but they are not well educated (or if they were, it was a long time ago) and they make very ignorant comments.
    Ah right, so the folk up here, SNP, supporters aren't? They watch braveheart and want to go Independent. If you look at demographics, Tory voters are more likely to be all round successfully in life (financially)
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Moura)
    The best way to encourage a more informed vote would be by having politics lessons at school instead of shite like PHSE or Citizenship. Just replace them with non-biased politics i.e. how the voting system works, the roles of the houses etc. so people would at least know what they are voting FOR.
    I agree, I would much rather have been taught useful stuff like this, instead of online safety 50 times over, but it does have an issue, sadly.

    "non-biased politics" is probably one of the biggest issues with this idea, because people often have very strong opinions about politics and their bias will come through in the way they teach this information. Sure, stuff like explaining the voting system and the houses would technically be able to be factual, but actually discussing the parties would obviously be a conflict of interest no matter what party the person in question supported, and that would also mean that there wouldn't really be a way to apply the facts to the political situation as a whole, at least not in a classroom setting. It's a shame, because I do think it is a good idea.

    (I never got citizenship lessons, what do you do?)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Moura)
    The best way to encourage a more informed vote would be by having politics lessons at school instead of shite like PHSE or Citizenship. Just replace them with non-biased politics i.e. how the voting system works, the roles of the houses etc. so people would at least know what they are voting FOR. but the tories would never allow that because they get a lot of their success from ignorance and fear.

    I think campaign honesty needs to be more seriously enforced. There should be punishment for lies, propaganda and misleading people... like the NHS bus from the Leave camp.
    Basic knowledge of the system would be good, but it's not enough. I don't think that campaign honesty can be enforced effectively, especially due to the short timescales. We need to rely on the media to scrutinise election claims IMO.

    I do wonder if each ballot slip shouldn't have a brief multiple-choice section to show that the voter knows at least some of the main policy proposals. That could be a slippery slope though.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RogerOxon)

    How do we ensure that people take their voting responsibility seriously, and are informed before they vote?
    I doubt is that even possible. I think that education systems in many countries do require urgent reforms, that would introduce the lessons of logic, critical thinking, philosophy , and for the sake of being just quite competent to vote: lessons of economy and political philosophy.
    Such reform of course won't be introduced, if it will, in most of cases it won't be done well. Even if it was, this can't exactly make them informed. I have a BA in politics, IQ about 125 and I constantly feel flooded with information, most of which is useless.
    To make a really good judgement, I would need to read the stats, acts, and check history of each party's decisions- it would consume most of my time and I would still make many mistakes in my decisions.

    Actually, I'm so tired about all this, I've written a very sloppy response :/ The longer I live, I get feeling that lots of people don't vote because they won't to get rid of politics from their life.

    Btw. this is a consequence of what I said, but let's state this clear: the news are not helpful at all. They flood us with tons of irrelevant information, while we need stats, expertises, summaries of major acts, and data gained through computional social science. Not incoherent and subjective opinions or reports on some individual who has killed himself. Thousands of people kill themselves each year, all we need to know is the statistical data.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrIso)
    Really?! Our school does **** all. eriously. We do cooking, Philosophy, Meditation, "Computer skills" (read- free period) and Sex Ed. Nothing about the government at all.
    Well we didn't do any of those things, and sex ed was in PSHE, not Citizenship for us. We actually had to present news articles and held a "mock election" after "designing" political parties and presenting a manifesto to the class. Although equally about half the time we spent watching films that had some vague element of social commentary.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    We need to rely on the media to scrutinise election claims IMO.
    Whilst media scrutiny is important, my feeling is that much more needs to be done to encourage people to scrutinise what they're reading themselves. Traditional media circulation is constantly falling, and instead people get their news from social media, which is truly lawless when it comes to integrity. So many posts, pictures and quotes are shared (including by intelligent friends of mine) because they support the point of view of the person sharing, rather than because they actually have any credibility. I saw a quote a while back along the lines of "one of the big problems today is that we only consider the authenticity of a news article on the 1st of April" - that well and truly applies to social media too.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    We need to rely on the media to scrutinise election claims IMO.
    That may be an unrealistic expectation given the financial position of most of the print media, whether publishing on paper or online.

    What was very noticeable from both the referendum and the 2017 election was the absence of reporters. That is why the lies of both campaigns in the refendum were not nailed and that is why the upsurge in support for Corbyn was not believed. I kept saying that the upsurge was a fault of polling because journalists were not finding and reporting it on the ground. The truth of the matter seems to be that there were no bloody journalists to look for it.

    As a result, the print media has become a collection of columnists writing articles promoting their political views unsupported by anything so robust as a fact.

    Newspaper propriators have always peddled their politics througth their leader columns and have always hired columnists broadly sympathic to their political outlook but the bulk of a newspaper's political coverage was reporting.

    Politicians have now spotted this.

    It isn't clear whether Corbyn deliberately lied about student debt or simply failed to correct a fortuitous misunderstanding but he only got away with this because no-one questioned either him or his education spokesman on the detail.

    Likewise May more or less got away with an uncosted manifesto,
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    People don't want to pay for journalism though (I am one of them haven't paid for a paper for years). Which means newspapers and their websites become reliant on advertising revenue or on state funding.

    Things like the tv licence and bbc funding should be completely outside the control of the ruling party and some of the rules about bbc impartiality should apply to the printed press.

    But then the same should apply to the national curriculum - the ruling party should not have the power to change it. Media studies (and understanding that the people producing media will often have an agenda) should be something we teach our kids from primary school age. Don't just ban advertising aimed at children - give them some tools to view them critically. The number of people (particularly older people) who don't know how to use snopes before sharing ******** on Facebook shows how poor our general media skills are. I don't know how to address that skills gap in older generations but it's something that's vital to equip our children with (more than memorising quotes for English exams).
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    People don't want to pay for journalism though (I am one of them haven't paid for a paper for years). Which means newspapers and their websites become reliant on advertising revenue or on state funding.

    Things like the tv licence and bbc funding should be completely outside the control of the ruling party and some of the rules about bbc impartiality should apply to the printed press.
    Impartiality can be the enemy of good journalism though. The BBC is probably the largest news organisation in the world, yet only Newsnight and Panorama do any investigative journalism. You are not impartial in BBC terms if you keep letting Woodward and Bernstein go on about a minor burglary or if you fail to mention the tens of thousands of women who obtained relief from morning sickness through thalidomide.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    OP rants about uninformed opinions and then provides no sources for any of his.

    0/10, must try harder.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.