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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Do you know if that's new for 2018? I note they also "favour" applicants with 4 A-levels and their typical offer is A*A*AA... ouch...

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    It's been in place for a while, as Forecast helpfully signals!
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    Oh yes I remember that thread (I posted in it ).
    I knew about their GCSE "requirement" but forgot about the A-levels.

    I'm always amused that some humanities students apply to the "STEMy" Churchill thinking they'll get an easy ride in...

    Probably explains why there are so few lawyers at Churchill (only 1 accepted in 2016, 2 in 2015 and 2014, none in 2013)
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    (Original post by Unionjem123)
    What grades would ideally be needed at A2 level for Biology, chemistry and maths to apply for bio Natsci during a gap year
    In principle, you would be in with a shout with A*A*A, particularly if one of the A*s is in Chemistry. You would be very competitive with A*A*A*. But I can give more detailed advice when you have your results - or you can sign up for a virtual/in-person slot at our post-results clinic: http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/admissi...ce-clinic-2017
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    I have already written this in another thread, but I still want to mention it again. In Germany we write 2 exams every semester. So far there have been 4 exams and I always achieved around 96% in Maths, which means that my grade would be '1+' or 15 points. But my teacher changed the grade boundaries and said that I need around 98% to get 15 points. Based on these exams she said that I am not able to achieve 15 points in the Abitur exams, ( in the Abitur you definitely get 15 points for 95%) although if corrected correctly, I would have had 15 points in 2 exams.. Sorry if my English is not the best...
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    Hi there,

    I am interested in applying to biological natural sciences. I am predicted A* in biology and maths and A is chemistry. I have also done AS further maths and I am waiting for my results. However, I will only have UMS marks for AS maths and AS further maths as I am doing the linear biology and chemistry A-levels. Even though I meet the A-level entry requirements for the course, I'm concerned about the A prediction in Chemistry. How would the A prediction in Chemistry be seen since it is a relevant A-level as I would like to study the biology and chemistry options (leading towards biochemistry)? I'm just nervous that the A prediction in chemistry will be looked down especially since I will not have any UMS marks for chemistry so all the universities I will apply to will just have to trust my schools prediction.

    Thank you for your help
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    We have "flags" for a variety of contextual factors (all of which apply to UK applicants, and some of which apply to all applicants): (i) whether an applicant has been in care; (ii) whether they come from an area where there is low progression to Higher Education; (iii) whether they come from an area which is socio-economically disadvantaged; (iv) whether they come from a school with low average GCSE performance; (v) whether they come from a school which sends very few students to Oxford and Cambridge; (vi) whether there are "extenuating circumstances" specific to this individual, e.g. familial disruption, bereavement, disability etc.

    We use these in various ways, the most significant of which is probably to help determine academic potential in instances where we are making fine distinctions between individuals with otherwise very similar profiles (let's say, for example, between two applicants with A*A*A at A-level, and 8888 at interview, one of whom has overcome serious hurdles and/or outperformed their school context, and the other of whom has not).
    Hi, Christ's College AT! Thanks for doing this!

    A question on 'flags':

    We know a school pupil who will be 'flagged' twice, on your criteria (ii) and (iii) because her family lives in a particular postcode. Yet both parents are UK graduates: one is senior in the legal profession and one is senior in the City. They own a large detached house and at least one successful business on the side.

    This pupil's friend, at the same school, does not qualify for any 'flags'. Her parents are both non-graduates and work as junior employees in catering. But they live in a 'better' post code in a small, rented flat.

    Your comments?
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    (Original post by ParentSaraG)
    Hi, Christ's College AT! Thanks for doing this!

    A question on 'flags':

    We know a school pupil who will be 'flagged' twice, on your criteria (ii) and (iii) because her family lives in a particular postcode. Yet both parents are UK graduates: one is senior in the legal profession and one is senior in the City. They own a large detached house and at least one successful business on the side.

    This pupil's friend, at the same school, does not qualify for any 'flags'. Her parents are both non-graduates and work as junior employees in catering. But they live in a 'better' post code in a small, rented flat.

    Your comments?
    I'm not the AT, but there's much more to getting an offer than a couple of flags. And also the postcode flags are (as far as I know) at a pretty granular level.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    I'm not the AT, but there's much more to getting an offer than a couple of flags. And also the postcode flags are (as far as I know) at a pretty granular level.

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    Just to be clear, both these pupils have been formally told of their 'flag status'.
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    (Original post by ParentSaraG)
    Just to be clear, both these pupils have been formally told of their 'flag status'.
    Interesting. By whom? Are they offer holders? Applications to Cambridge for 2018 aren't open yet.
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    (Original post by ParentSaraG)
    Hi, Christ's College AT! Thanks for doing this!

    A question on 'flags':

    We know a school pupil who will be 'flagged' twice, on your criteria (ii) and (iii) because her family lives in a particular postcode. Yet both parents are UK graduates: one is senior in the legal profession and one is senior in the City. They own a large detached house and at least one successful business on the side.

    This pupil's friend, at the same school, does not qualify for any 'flags'. Her parents are both non-graduates and work as junior employees in catering. But they live in a 'better' post code in a small, rented flat.

    Your comments?
    I think the flagging system is far from perfect, and some of the flags are to my mind more useful than others, with criteria (ii) and (iii) being the two that probably carry least weight, in many individual application decisions. However, these criteria are linked to the targets that the University of Cambridge has agreed with the Office of Fair Access, on the grounds that postcode offers a reasonable - if not foolproof - proxy for educational disadvantage, (all such proxies are crude, in my view) - and that is why we see "flags" for them on our application spreadsheet, and why we track them, at a high level, across the gathered field.

    That said, it should be stressed that the existence of flags does not mean that we do not take account of the kind of granular, "un-flagged" detail that you mention in your second example, if we are told about it on an application (and we are usually told about parental educational level, and employment status).
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Interesting. By whom? Are they offer holders? Applications to Cambridge for 2018 aren't open yet.
    There are some Year 11 and Year 12 outreach events (e.g. the Low Participation Neighbourhood Summer School, set up by my predecessor, which still runs at Christ's/Murray Edwards) for which eligibility is determined by postcode, and it is relatively easy to check whether one is in a Polar 1 or 2 neighbourhood - though actually, we wouldn't generally tell an offer-holder this. Conversely, there are some outreach events for which parental education level would be an eligibility criteria...
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    . Conversely, there are some outreach events for which parental education level would be an eligibility criteria...
    Indeed like Sutton Trust. Thanks

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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Hi everyone, I'm the Admissions Tutor at Christ's College, and I'm here to answer any questions you might have about applications or admissions to the University of Cambridge, or to Christ's College specifically, until August 08. So please fire away!
    I applied to Cambridge last year, but unfortunately was rejected, and I wish to apply again this year. I would like to hear from you with regards to my reference.

    Should I approach the teacher (who taught me the subject that is related to what I am applying to in Cambridge) who wrote my reference last year, and ask him to submit a new reference? Would it disadvantage me in anyway as the university probably knows that the same teacher has submitted two different references for the same student in different years?

    What would you suggest?
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    (Original post by isaacnow)
    I applied to Cambridge last year, but unfortunately was rejected, and I wish to apply again this year. I would like to hear from you with regards to my reference.

    Should I approach the teacher (who taught me the subject that is related to what I am applying to in Cambridge) who wrote my reference last year, and ask him to submit a new reference? Would it disadvantage me in anyway as the university probably knows that the same teacher has submitted two different references for the same student in different years?

    What would you suggest?
    Actually, we destroy and/or anonymise all data relating to unsuccessful applications at the end of each cycle, so technically the University doesn't have any way of checking your past references, or past referees.

    If you feel the teacher who wrote the reference last year is the person best placed to comment on your ability and potential, then there is no reason you should not ask him to submit an updated reference.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Actually, we destroy and/or anonymise all data relating to unsuccessful applications at the end of each cycle, so technically the University doesn't have any way of checking your past references, or past referees.

    If you feel the teacher who wrote the reference last year is the person best placed to comment on your ability and potential, then there is no reason you should not ask him to submit an updated reference.
    Does this practice of destroying/anonymising all data relating to unsuccessful applications at the end of each cycle apply only to Cambridge or does it also apply to all UK universities?
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    Looking back at the 2017 Decisions thread on here, I notice other examples of the standard offer having been modified by 1 A*, so i am now a bit confused!
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Do you know if that's new for 2018? I note they also "favour" applicants with 4 A-levels and their typical offer is A*A*AA... ouch...

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    (Original post by isaacnow)
    Does this practice of destroying/anonymising all data relating to unsuccessful applications at the end of each cycle apply only to Cambridge or does it also apply to all UK universities?
    It's up to the other universities to decide what to do. But universities don't hold grudges if you are reapplying*

    *There are some specific exceptions. Are you a medic applicant?

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    (Original post by isaacnow)
    Does this practice of destroying/anonymising all data relating to unsuccessful applications at the end of each cycle apply only to Cambridge or does it also apply to all UK universities?
    I would think all universities do something similar, to comply with data protection legislation.
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    (Original post by DorotheaB)
    Looking back at the 2017 Decisions thread on here, I notice other examples of the standard offer having been modified by 1 A*, so i am now a bit confused!
    You asked me about the "standard offer", i.e. the offer given to most successful applicants in that subject.

    However, as I noted in my first post, all colleges can and often do modify that offer in individual cases, i.e. make one or two "non-standard" offers, e.g. by tying the A* to a particular subject, or (more rarely) asking for an additional A* - usually when an applicant is strong on paper but has performed poorly or inconsistently in their interviews and/or assessment.

    One thing to flag about the 2017 Decisions thread, incidentally, is that there was a measure of exaggeration on it - I saw some (fairly easily identifiable) Christ's offer-holders claiming to have much stiffer offers than they actually did!
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    It's up to the other universities to decide what to do. But universities don't hold grudges if you are reapplying*

    *There are some specific exceptions. Are you a medic applicant?

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    Nope, I am applying for Economics.

    It's just that I am unsure if I should ask a new teacher (who taught me a subject that is unrelated to Economics) to submit a new reference for me, or to approach the same teacher (who taught me Economics) who wrote my reference last year, and ask him to submit a new reference for me (which I am afraid would disadvantage me as there would be two different references coming from the same teacher).
 
 
 
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