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Is History a good degree? Watch

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    (Original post by Tomm98)
    HI everyone,

    Again I feel that I have been put down by people studying science subjects, so I am just coming here to speak about it.

    I study History at a top ranked uni for it (I won't name my Uni, but it is in the top 5 for History).

    I worry that I won't be able to get a good job after it, as it is not a science/engineering degree.

    I hate being made to feel so inferior by so called 'friends' who study Science degrees. They say things jokingly to me, but deep down, it really gets to me. There is so much work and pressure on this degree.

    I worked very hard to get here, but I worry that because of my subject choice, I have no future.

    I am not going to speak to these 'friends' anymore. They make me so upset.
    It is as good a degree as any.

    Your "friends" are dickwads who clearly don't understand the dynamics of graduate prospects and probably put much of their sense of self into what they study. Truth is they probably have no idea what they want to do with their lives anyway.

    History is a great general degree, it opens up doors to do specific things (e.g. historian, museum work, research etc) but also opens doors to the vast majority of grad schemes (anything from finance, to law, to whatever) that are open to all.

    How competitive you'll be for that stuff, however, is more about what you've spent your time doing at uni - extracurriculars, work experience, part time jobs, leadership, your grades.

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    (Original post by constantine2016)
    I'm also doing a English and History degree and I love it, even though it is very hard. My extended family is always asking me if I plan to work in retail as they are all studying STEM subjects.

    Here is the thing though. A degree like history means you can change careers more easily than say a person doing computer science. A lot of history graduates have gone on to do different things. A lot of politicians have history degrees as do lawyers, civil servants, and headteachers.

    In the end it is not your degree that matters but how much ambition you have to get to a certain career.
    Well, no.

    That is false. Any respected degree will keep doors open. There's nothing stopping a CompSci from doing politics or teaching or law.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    It is as good a degree as any.

    Your "friends" are dickwads who clearly don't understand the dynamics of graduate prospects and probably put much of their sense of self into what they study. Truth is they probably have no idea what they want to do with their lives anyway.

    History is a great general degree, it opens up doors to do specific things (e.g. historian, museum work, research etc) but also opens doors to the vast majority of grad schemes (anything from finance, to law, to whatever) that are open to all.

    How competitive you'll be for that stuff, however, is more about what you've spent your time doing at uni - extracurriculars, work experience, part time jobs, leadership, your grades.

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    The amount of history grads in IB..
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Well, no.

    That is false. Any respected degree will keep doors open. There's nothing stopping a CompSci from doing politics or teaching or law.

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    Well there is in the fact that law involves a lot of academic writing/reading and if you did a course like computer science where you don't do much academic writing or reading then you will find it very hard to get into the practice whereas a history graduate won't. You would have to study way more than a history graduate would just to simply be able to gain the academic writing skills needed in a law degree.

    Computer science graduates could go into politics but it is more common for humanities graduates to go into politics because humanities graduates develop good skills in forming arguments.
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    (Original post by constantine2016)
    Well there is in the fact that law involves a lot of academic writing/reading and if you did a course like computer science where you don't do much academic writing or reading then you will find it very hard to get into the practice whereas a history graduate won't. You would have to study way more than a history graduate would just to simply be able to gain the academic writing skills needed in a law degree.

    Computer science graduates could go into politics but it is more common for humanities graduates to go into politics because humanities graduates develop good skills in forming arguments.
    Any STEM grads get up to speed with all that by going through the GDL. The LPC also helps.
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    (Original post by Tomm98)
    HI everyone,

    Again I feel that I have been put down by people studying science subjects, so I am just coming here to speak about it.

    I study History at a top ranked uni for it (I won't name my Uni, but it is in the top 5 for History).

    I worry that I won't be able to get a good job after it, as it is not a science/engineering degree.

    I hate being made to feel so inferior by so called 'friends' who study Science degrees. They say things jokingly to me, but deep down, it really gets to me. There is so much work and pressure on this degree.

    I worked very hard to get here, but I worry that because of my subject choice, I have no future.

    I am not going to speak to these 'friends' anymore. They make me so upset.
    From HESCUs "What Do Graduates Do" paper:

    Given that there is a nationwide need for students with good science skills to populate research and development in the future, why do this year’s statistics show higher levels of unemployment amongst science graduates than graduates as a whole?

    The recently published Wakeham report suggests that there are several key factors for both un- and under-employment among science graduates. Employers are less concerned about where and what a graduate studied and much more concerned about their lack of soft skills, business awareness and industrial experience. Not only are graduates lacking skills such as the ability to give presentations, manage projects, write reports and work in teams, but there are particular concerns about a lack of maths skills and most notably, a lack of adaptability and resilience.

    As in previous years, history graduates are the most likely of those in this subject cluster to pursue further study, with 21.8% doing so (compared to 13.1% of all graduates). This further study may be academic in nature, or more vocational, with training in fields as diverse as law, accountancy, journalism, librarianship, teaching and IT. This shows that the study of history provides a firm basis for further career development. There is similarly a great variety in the types of occupation pursued, with the ten most common jobs including marketing, human resources, and roles in education (particularly as a teaching assistant). In common with English, history graduates are able to draw on the transferable skills they have developed during their degree, such as communication; analytical skills; the use of IT; and working with others.
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    (Original post by constantine2016)
    Well there is in the fact that law involves a lot of academic writing/reading and if you did a course like computer science where you don't do much academic writing or reading then you will find it very hard to get into the practice whereas a history graduate won't. You would have to study way more than a history graduate would just to simply be able to gain the academic writing skills needed in a law degree.

    Computer science graduates could go into politics but it is more common for humanities graduates to go into politics because humanities graduates develop good skills in forming arguments.
    Tis called the GDL and LPC which both stem and non-law humanities students have to go through, there's nothing different in the process.

    Ok, CompSci develops strong logical reasoning and problem solving skills...

    Point is no respected degree limits you to anything.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    It's not like a science/engineering degree guarantees you a job anyway, jobs in those fields are still oversubscribed just like all the other grad jobs out there.
    ill disagree with engineering being oversubscribed...
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    ill disagree with engineering being oversubscribed...
    Unemployment rate of all graduates: 6.7%

    Unemployment rate of Mechanical engineering grads: 7.8%
    Unemployment rate of Electrical engineering grads: 8.3%
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    (Original post by Tomm98)
    HI everyone,

    Again I feel that I have been put down by people studying science subjects, so I am just coming here to speak about it.

    I study History at a top ranked uni for it (I won't name my Uni, but it is in the top 5 for History).

    I worry that I won't be able to get a good job after it, as it is not a science/engineering degree.

    I hate being made to feel so inferior by so called 'friends' who study Science degrees. They say things jokingly to me, but deep down, it really gets to me. There is so much work and pressure on this degree.

    I worked very hard to get here, but I worry that because of my subject choice, I have no future.

    I am not going to speak to these 'friends' anymore. They make me so upset.
    First things first, those people who make you feel bad for studying history aren't nice people.
    Secondly, you'll be more able to get a good job and have a wider variety of jobs available to you when you graduate - history has awesome transferable skills (part of the reason why I'm going on to study it with Media, Communications and Culture at uni in September!). You do you. You can never guarantee a job. My brother has a chemistry degree and was super snobby about STEM subjects and currently he is working in business, partially because he couldn't find a job in chemistry and partially because he hated chemistry after his degree. As far as I know, if you work hard and can show how good you are at what you do, you should be fine. I wish you lots of luck!
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    FOOK History
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Unemployment rate of all graduates: 6.7%

    Unemployment rate of Mechanical engineering grads: 7.8%
    Unemployment rate of Electrical engineering grads: 8.3%
    hmm,
    (Original post by J-SP)
    Unemployment rate of all graduates: 6.7%

    Unemployment rate of Mechanical engineering grads: 7.8%
    Unemployment rate of Electrical engineering grads: 8.3%
    your stats are irrelevant unless you quote your reference.

    then I'll believe you
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    https://www.hecsu.ac.uk/assets/asset...es_do_2016.pdf

    and I typed it wrong. General grad unemployment is 5.7% not 6.7%
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    https://www.hecsu.ac.uk/assets/asset...es_do_2016.pdf

    and I typed it wrong. General grad unemployment is 5.7% not 6.7%
    That's disappointing to hear from a prospective engineering student...

    I don't think it's being from over subscribed however because you have more than likely heard of the "skills shortages in engineering".
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    True! It's often down to the lack of soft skills in Engineering applicants.
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    Here we go again. :banghead:
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    (Original post by Tomm98)
    HI everyone,

    Again I feel that I have been put down by people studying science subjects, so I am just coming here to speak about it.

    I study History at a top ranked uni for it (I won't name my Uni, but it is in the top 5 for History).

    I worry that I won't be able to get a good job after it, as it is not a science/engineering degree.

    I hate being made to feel so inferior by so called 'friends' who study Science degrees. They say things jokingly to me, but deep down, it really gets to me. There is so much work and pressure on this degree.

    I worked very hard to get here, but I worry that because of my subject choice, I have no future.

    I am not going to speak to these 'friends' anymore. They make me so upset.
    It's not your subject choice which determines your future, its you. It's the work experience you can offer prospective employers along with a strong job application which makes you employable. And I cannot emphasise the need for work experience enough.
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    (Original post by Samendra)
    I never said that I wasn't sympathetic, I just stated the facts. Your friends should try to help you progress in life and in your career repeating insults isn't the way to do it.
    You were being a bit of a smug ass


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    (Original post by apeshit007)
    FOOK History
    You could learn a thing or two about history judging by your posts


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    (Original post by YaliaV)
    You could learn a thing or two about history judging by your posts


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    Calm down its a joke. And i got a B in history quite decent considering I had a supply teacher for 5 months and I probably would have got a A if my teacher didn't give birth early.
    What could have been if it wasn't for that baby.
 
 
 
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