Dominicque2
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Doonesbury)
Call your Cambridge college and ask them. And then call up your old schools and chase them up.
Would they be available this week? What would I ask my school, wouldn't it only be relevant to high school? Would they sign it off, how does it work out?
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Doones
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#82
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(Original post by Dominicque2)
Would they be available this week? What would I ask my school, wouldn't it only be relevant to high school? Would they sign it off, how does it work out?
Would who be available? Your Cambridge college is certainly open - call them first and clarify what they require and when.

Then call your schools. I have no idea if a specific school is "available" (and not all schools are on half-term this week, some were last week) but even on half-term school offices are likely to be open.
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Aardwolf
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#83
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Hey. I'm currently 20 and looking to start an Access to HE course in Law & Criminology when I'm 21. I completed two A-levels and a BTEC when I was 18, achieving mediocre results (CCM). I'm hoping to make a strong application to Cambridge Law with strong Access results, but I'm wondering if my previous A-level results will hinder my application or not. Thanks in advance for any help/advice.
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St Edmund's Admission
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#84
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#84
Hi Aardwolf, your previous results won't hinder your application as long as the results from your Access course are all distinctions. It might be worth considering applying in the March round when you will already have some results to show the College.

We would also look for evidence that you have pursued your interests independently - Lots of reading to prepare you for the intensity of the course.

Finally, make sure you know why you are applying to Cambridge Law, as opposed to any other Law course out there. They are all very different and you need to find the one that suits your interests and academic strengths.

Please also look at Access to Humanities courses. They serve as very good preparation for the Law tripos.

(Original post by Aardwolf)
Hey. I'm currently 20 and looking to start an Access to HE course in Law & Criminology when I'm 21. I completed two A-levels and a BTEC when I was 18, achieving mediocre results (CCM). I'm hoping to make a strong application to Cambridge Law with strong Access results, but I'm wondering if my previous A-level results will hinder my application or not. Thanks in advance for any help/advice.
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Aardwolf
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#85
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(Original post by Lucy Cavendish Admissions)
Hi Aardwolf, your previous results won't hinder your application as long as the results from your Access course are all distinctions. It might be worth considering applying in the March round when you will already have some results to show the College.

We would also look for evidence that you have pursued your interests independently - Lots of reading to prepare you for the intensity of the course.

Finally, make sure you know why you are applying to Cambridge Law, as opposed to any other Law course out there. They are all very different and you need to find the one that suits your interests and academic strengths.

Please also look at Access to Humanities courses. They serve as very good preparation for the Law tripos.
Thank you very much for the response, all great stuff to hear!
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crxl
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#86
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Hi, I recently graduated from Durham University with honours in law, but I wish to do an affiliate study with Cambridge in Law again as there are some modules that Durham University did not offer which Cambridge does. May I know if I am allowed to do so; also, the classification of my degree is 2:2, but only because I had severe mitigating circumstances. What are the chances that I could study with the college if I can give evidence regarding those circumstances?
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Doones
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(Original post by crxl)
Hi, I recently graduated from Durham University with honours in law, but I wish to do an affiliate study with Cambridge in Law again as there are some modules that Durham University did not offer which Cambridge does. May I know if I am allowed to do so; also, the classification of my degree is 2:2, but only because I had severe mitigating circumstances. What are the chances that I could study with the college if I can give evidence regarding those circumstances?
I'm not the AT but why not do a masters in the topics that interest you? You won't get student finance for a 2nd undergraduate degree, and you also have to pay College Tuition Fees at Cambridge (an extra £10k or so per year).

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crxl
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I would but my degree is not even 2:1 classification; the requirement for the LLM is a first.
(Original post by Doonesbury)
I'm not the AT but why not do a masters in the topics that interest you? You won't get student finance for a 2nd undergraduate degree, and you also have to pay College Tuition Fees at Cambridge (an extra £10k or so per year).

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Doones
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(Original post by crxl)
I would but my degree is not even 2:1 classification; the requirement for the LLM is a first.
Yes, I know, so maybe look elsewhere, not Cambridge. I suspect you will have the same problem (the 2:2) applying for an affiliate degree at Cambridge too.
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crxl
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Yes, I know, so maybe look elsewhere, not Cambridge. I suspect you will have the same problem (the 2:2) applying for an affiliate degree at Cambridge too.
Hence my original question - the 2:2 was a result of serious illness and completing of examinations in the hospital
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Doones
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(Original post by crxl)
Hence my original question - the 2:2 was a result of serious illness and completing of examinations in the hospital
So it's probably best to contact a couple of colleges about your circumstances, and the department for the LLM route. Colleges are responsible for undergraduate admissions, and departments for postgraduates.

And there's the question of costs.
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crxl
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
So it's probably best to contact a couple of colleges about your circumstances, and the department for the LLM route. Colleges are responsible for undergraduate admissions, and departments for postgraduates.

And there's the question of costs.
great, thank you!
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midforest
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#93
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Presumably many applicants who are mature students have unconventional and varied histories when it comes to their lives and their academic records. What do the successful applicants do that turns their bad grades and difficult pasts around? How do they become successful Cambridge students?

That is, what do you usually see from successful applicants who have made comebacks?

As an applications representative at a mature students college I suspect you have seen this happen more often than other places. Thanks for reading.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by midforest)
Presumably many applicants who are mature students have unconventional and varied histories when it comes to their lives and their academic records. What do the successful applicants do that turns their bad grades and difficult pasts around? How do they become successful Cambridge students?

That is, what do you usually see from successful applicants who have made comebacks?

As an applications representative at a mature students college I suspect you have seen this happen more often than other places. Thanks for reading!
There are a variety of options, or combinations of options that mature students offer

  • Recent study that has been very successful, eg some OU modules
  • Evidence of real in-depth reading and understanding of the subject, giving a strong research proposal (PG applicants)
  • Several years of relevant professional experience (military, journalists, NGOs business etc)


They basically have to convince that they currently have the potential to operate at the same starting level, be that UG or PG as someone with a more traditional background. There is no negative scoring for past educational grades etc, but you've got to be able to evidence you are up to the start level and have the same potential. Recent study is the best way to do that if you aren't in an established and relevant career.
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Maths&physics
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#95
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(Original post by Lucy Cavendish Admissions)
Hi everyone, I'm the new Admissions Tutor at Lucy Cavendish. Lucy Cavendish focuses on the education of students aged 21 and over.

I'm here to answer any questions you might have about applying to Cambridge as a mature student, affiliate, postgraduate, or simply a little bit later than the norm. If you are going to be 21 or over at the time you start University, you might want to bear in mind that applications to Cambridge stay open beyond October 15, in many subjects.

how are self-taught a-levels viewed. compared to being taught? thanks
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St Edmund's Admission
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#96
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#96
(Original post by midforest)
Presumably many applicants who are mature students have unconventional and varied histories when it comes to their lives and their academic records. What do the successful applicants do that turns their bad grades and difficult pasts around? How do they become successful Cambridge students?

That is, what do you usually see from successful applicants who have made comebacks?

As an applications representative at a mature students college I suspect you have seen this happen more often than other places. Thanks for reading.
Hi Midforest, thanks for the question. We look for evidence of recent learning at A Level standard. This may be A Levels, or an Access to HE course. Previous grades which are lower than our entrance requirements will not count against you if you have gone on to acheive highly in the last two years. Applications to science courses here will need A*A*A at A Level (we do not accept Access courses in the sciences) and Arts and Humanities courses require A*AA or distinctions in all graded components of an Access course.

We see a lot of unconventional applications at Lucy Cavendish and I would encourage those considering Cambridge as a mature student to contact our Admissions Office at an early stage so we can guide you through the process.
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St Edmund's Admission
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#97
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(Original post by Maths&physics)
how are self-taught a-levels viewed. compared to being taught? thanks
Hi there,
We receive applications from many students who have self taught A Levels. It is always impressive to see someone who succeeds in their A Levels purely through self teaching. We recognise that not everyone has access to A Level teaching post 19 years old. The minimum requirement for the University remains the same A*A*A for the sciences and A*AA for Arts and Humanities subjects.
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Maths&physics
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#98
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(Original post by Lucy Cavendish Admissions)
Hi there,
We receive applications from many students who have self taught A Levels. It is always impressive to see someone who succeeds in their A Levels purely through self teaching. We recognise that not everyone has access to A Level teaching post 19 years old. The minimum requirement for the University remains the same A*A*A for the sciences and A*AA for Arts and Humanities subjects.
Can you make individual offers based on circumstances?
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St Edmund's Admission
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#99
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(Original post by Maths&physics)
Can you make individual offers based on circumstances?
The minimum offer level reflects the starting level of the degree here. It would not be in an individual's best interest to accept them onto a course for which they are not prepared. There are a variety of ways you can acheive the entry level and I would encourage you to speak with a member of our admissions office.
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Maths&physics
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(Original post by Lucy Cavendish Admissions)
The minimum offer level reflects the starting level of the degree here. It would not be in an individual's best interest to accept them onto a course for which they are not prepared. There are a variety of ways you can acheive the entry level and I would encourage you to speak with a member of our admissions office.
that make's sense.

i sent my extenuating circumstances form on Thursday via first class but the college hasn't received it. i guess that the day i sent it doesn't matter if you don't recieve it on time? thanks
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