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Surviving as a student: Learning to cook before university Watch

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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    My wife hates mixing sweet and savory but I really enjoy it. This recipe sounds delicious! And so simple too! Might give it a go :yy:

    The problem I find with stir-fry is that it's always kind of soggy the next day. I'm not sure if that's me putting too much sauce on (it's fine day of cooking), so I usually end up wasting some just because it doesn't look/taste too good later.
    Thanks. I love the sweet and savoury mix, especially with stir fry for some reason.
    Mine tends to get a bit gooey the next day too. I don't mind it too much, but it helps to have prawn crackers with it to give it a different, more crunchy, texture. I think it probably also helps to leave it to cool fully before covering it and putting it in the fridge. Maybe even putting a sheet of kitchen roll at the top of the tub with it.

    I hope you enjoy it! Feel free to let me know how it goes if you do try it.
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    Okay okay just one more then I'm going to bed...

    breadcrumbed halloumi
    You can also apply the coating technique to chicken or anything else and just adjust cooking time.

    You will need: egg (or butter), flour, breadcrumbs, any seasoning you want. I like to use honey and orange zest.
    Cut your halloumi into whatever shape you want. Prepare three bowls- one with flour, one with the egg (or melted butter) and one with the breadcrumbs. Add seasoning to either the wash or the breadcrumbs (liquid in the wash and powder in the breadcrumbs). I zest and orange into the wash and add a decent squeeze of honey.
    Roll the halloumi in the flour so it is well coated then shake off and excess. Dunk the halloumi in the wash and make sure it is fully coated. Let any excess drip off before coating. Cover the halloumi in the breadcrumbs.

    You can then fry it in a pan or air fryer or cook it in the oven. Since the halloumi is already safe to eat you just need to cook it until the coating is nice and crispy. That's usually about 15 mins in my air fryer/ convection oven thing-ie on about 130.


    This goes really well with a simple potato gratin and some veg or in a burger with tomato and avocado.
    For the potato gratin, boil potato then layer it in a microwave safe dish with milk, butter, cheese and some garlic. Microwave it until the cheese is melted start with about a minuet and see how it goes from there.
    For the veg either use steam bag veg or put some peas and/ or sweetcorn in a microwave safe mug with water and microwave for about 4 mins.
    For the burger, smash up some avocado and shove it all in a bun.


    (I will see about finding a picture for this too)
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    Super easy meatballs. Serves 2 big portions (I cook for both myself and my boyfriend and we have massive appetites.

    1x 450g pack of turkey mince in Lidl or Aldi £1.89 or lower (they were on offer in lidl for £1.19 last week).
    1x onion (pack of 6-7 is 55p in Lidl) so equals less than 10p.
    1x can chopped tomato 30-40p
    1 x knorr stock jelly, I personally use beef. But you can use chicken, vegetables etc. Works out at 25p (4 pack is £1)
    a few cloves of garlic finely grated 15p
    about a thumbs worth of ginger finely grated 10p
    half a pack of 300g mushrooms, sliced (50p)

    = £3.29/ £1.65 per serving + cost of accompaniment:

    Can be served over pasta, rice, potatoes, with a salad. Whatever you fancy.

    General cupboard items needed:
    oil, soy sauce or fish sauce, salt and pepper to taste.

    In a bowl mix together the turkey mince and half of the grated garlic and ginger, then add 1 tablespoon of either fish sauce or soy sauce. Fish sauce is better, but in a pinch soy sauce will work. Roll mince into meatballs, whatever size you prefer. If they aren't binding well, try adding a tablespoon of flour to the mixture. Set aside on a plate ready to cook.

    Chop up your onion and onions and fry in a frying pan or wok until the onions are turning translucent and the mushrooms tender. Add the can of chopped tomatoes and stock. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to simmer, add the rest of the garlic and ginger and simmer until the sauce thickens and the tomatoes break down into a sauce.

    In a separate pan shallow fry your meatballs until cooked through, then add to the sauce. Serve with whatever you fancy such as pasta, rice, salad, whatever.

    You can cook the meatballs in the sauce, it just takes longer and I'm impatient.

    This dish works even better if you add fresh coriander to the meatballs. But I rarely do, because a pack is 89p each and it goes off before half of it even gets used, and I don't have money to waste :lol: . Does't work well with dried coriander.


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    Attachment 678288

    Last time I made turkey meatballs this way. I also often do them in a thai style peanut sauce.
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    'Pasta with courgettes'
    Fairly self explanatory, but a few added ingredients:

    Courgette(s)
    Pasta - best with e.g. fusili or penne
    Olive oil
    Garlic cloves
    Parmesan
    Black pepper / salt to taste

    Slice the courgette and crush the garlic (I just crush the cloves whole, not peeled or chopped) and fry gently in a good quantity of olive oil. Not a 'deep frying' amount, but the oil is there as an ingredient, so not just a smear on the bottom of the pan. The aim is to brown the slices of courgette a little on both sides, not reduce then to a mush.

    Meanwhile, cook and drain the pasta.

    Add the cooked pasta to the courgette / oil / garlic pan, season to taste.

    Add shaved (use a 'Y' potato peeler) or grated parmesan and serve.

    Yes, olive oil is a bit expensive, but the ones they sell in Lidl and Aldi taste okay and a bottle will last quite a long time (unless you are making this recipe every night!). Look out for courgettes in the supermarkets' 'Super six' type selection when they are in season.
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    The first challenge is up! Remember you can change it how you like, and to let us know in there how you get on! Get cooking

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4856690
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    If I just want a snack, I'll just make pizza toast - toast, tomato puree, cheese and some herbs.
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    From Asda/Tesco buy:

    1kg pack of pasta (less than £1)
    900g - 1kg pack of frozen mixed veg (£1)
    Pasta sauce in a jar (less than £1)

    Boil the pasta with veg, drain, add pasta sauce.

    Add any meat (buy chicken or lamb in cubes from butchers - they'll cut it how you want for free) by frying in 2 tbsp oil and any seasoning (chilli, salt, pepper, garlic etc).

    Overcooking is always better than undercooking. Leave pasta/veg until they feel really soft with a fork.
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    Latest challenge is up! Lasagne by the wonderful Kindred

    If you'd like to do the next one or have recipe suggestions for it to be then let me know we also have a new food photography thread for us all to sit and drool at! Let's get cooking :woo:
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    I've got a cracking little recipe that I adapted from a BBC Good Food book I have. It might look a little intimidating for beginners, but it's actually really straightforward. Nice and healthy, too. This amount should make at least 4 servings, so it's great for sharing/keeping in the freezer.

    Chicken and Apricot Stew.

    2 tbsp oil
    8 boneless chicken thighs (the equivalent amount in breasts would be fine, too)
    1 white onion, sliced
    2 tsp plain flour
    2 tsp cumin
    2 tsp coriander
    1 tsp paprika
    1 clove garlic, crushed
    1 red chilli, finely chopped
    600ml chicken stock
    12 dried apricots (you could actually leave these out if you don't like apricots, it should still taste good without them)
    Salt and pepper
    Rice and peas, to serve.

    1. Add chicken and half the oil, cook for 7 minutes or so until golden. When done, remove the chicken from the pan and set aside on a plate or whatever. Add the remaining oil and cook the onions until they start going brown, then add the chicken back to the pan.

    2. Chuck in the flour, spices, garlic and chilli, and cook for 1-2 minutes, stirring constantly. Then add the chicken stock and give it a stir. Turn down the heat and leave it to simmer for 15 minutes.

    3. After 15 minutes, add the apricots and leave to simmer for another 15 minutes.

    4. Meanwhile, cook the rice. When the rice is cooked, add a handful of peas and mix them in.

    5. Give the stew a taste, then add as much salt and pepper as you like. When you're happy with the flavour, serve it up with a portion of the rice.


    Tips: Always chop everything before you start to cook. Mix the flour, spices, chilli and garlic in a little bowl beforehand too, since you'll be adding them all at the same time. That makes everything so much easier when you're in the middle of cooking. Remember to remove the seeds from the chilli, unless you like your food to be pretty hot. Don't worry if you do something wrong or forget something. Like most skills in life, cooking is a constant learning process
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    Just wanted to introduce myself, I'm Rachel and I'm the author of Student Eats, a new student cookbook which as 120 quick, cheap, easy and healthy recipes for students with limited budget, kitchen skill and equipment. It's full of everything I cooked for myself as a student, and has chapters on breakfasts, lunch, solo suppers, make-ahead meals, food for friends and a few treats, and you can grab a copy here: http://amzn.to/2uMa2Nt, and find some more of my student recipes on my blog here: http://www.rachelphipps.com/search/label/student suppersI've partnered with The Student Room on some video recipes for new students that should be going live soon, but in the meanwhile I'll be around the forums if you have any questions about student cooking!
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    Next challenge is up! The potato games, by the one and only Kindred! With that title you've got to have a look...
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    I made pitta bread for the first time today to have with my keema matar curry. I was HIGHLY surprised by how easy it was to make.

    250g strong white bread flour
    150ml warm water
    1 teaspoon salt
    7g dried yeast (most yeast sachets come in packs of 7g)

    in a bowl mix all dry ingredients then gradually add the water until a dough forms, if after thoroughly mixed it is stick add more flour a sprinkling at a time.
    Knead dough on a well oiled surface for 5-10 minutes until smooth.
    Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise until doubled in size (took about an hour for me as my kitchen is cold)

    Tip dough onto a floured surface, punch and knead the air out of the dough. Split dough into 5 even sized pieces and roll into balls. With a rolling pin flatten each ball until about half a centimetre thick.

    Preheat oven to 190c.

    Place 2 discs of dough at a time onto a hot floured tray and bake in the oven for 5-10 minutes. It should puff up, take out of the oven when the pittas start to go golden around the edges.

    Pictures in spoiler
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    What? You should be able to cook long before going off to university.
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    idk how to cook proper meals and I have several food intolerances meaning there is very little I can actually eat, so I'm not looking forward to this part of uni when I go next year XD
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    (Original post by flabi)
    idk how to cook proper meals and I have several food intolerances meaning there is very little I can actually eat, so I'm not looking forward to this part of uni when I go next year XD
    What are your intolerances?

    I have a friend with several as well, there is literally nowhere safe for him to go to eat anymore

    Cooking proper meals is easy once you've got the hang of the basics. I love to cook and do it pretty much every day.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    What are your intolerances?

    I have a friend with several as well, there is literally nowhere safe for him to go to eat anymore

    Cooking proper meals is easy once you've got the hang of the basics. I love to cook and do it pretty much every day.
    I have Crohn's disease so it's very complicated, but to put it fairly simply I can't eat:

    fruit (except cucumber)
    peppers
    lactose
    greasy food (including things cooked in too much oil)
    any sauces that aren't tomato sauce (idk why)
    any stews or casseroles (even if I can eat the individual ingredients... again, idk why)
    spicy food
    anything with fruit juice in it

    So yeah I don't exactly have normal eating habits XD I can eat spag bol, so I feel like that is what I'll live off...

    What intolerances does your friend have?

    Glad to hear you love cooking
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    (Original post by flabi)
    I have Crohn's disease so it's very complicated, but to put it fairly simply I can't eat:

    fruit (except cucumber)
    peppers
    lactose
    greasy food (including things cooked in too much oil)
    any sauces that aren't tomato sauce (idk why)
    any stews or casseroles (even if I can eat the individual ingredients... again, idk why)
    spicy food
    anything with fruit juice in it

    So yeah I don't exactly have normal eating habits XD I can eat spag bol, so I feel like that is what I'll live off...

    What intolerances does your friend have?

    Glad to hear you love cooking
    Ahhh I see, yeah chrons certainly is more complicated.

    He is coeliac, but also intolerant to all dairy products, eggs, soy and red meat.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I made pitta bread for the first time today to have with my keema matar curry. I was HIGHLY surprised by how easy it was to make.

    250g strong white bread flour
    150ml warm water
    1 teaspoon salt
    7g dried yeast (most yeast sachets come in packs of 7g)

    in a bowl mix all dry ingredients then gradually add the water until a dough forms, if after thoroughly mixed it is stick add more flour a sprinkling at a time.
    Knead dough on a well oiled surface for 5-10 minutes until smooth.
    Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise until doubled in size (took about an hour for me as my kitchen is cold)

    Tip dough onto a floured surface, punch and knead the air out of the dough. Split dough into 5 even sized pieces and roll into balls. With a rolling pin flatten each ball until about half a centimetre thick.

    Preheat oven to 190c.

    Place 2 discs of dough at a time onto a hot floured tray and bake in the oven for 5-10 minutes. It should puff up, take out of the oven when the pittas start to go golden around the edges.

    Pictures in spoiler
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    I'm very impressed.
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    (Original post by SirMilkSheikh)
    I'm very impressed.
    Thanks you should give it a go :gthumb:
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Thanks you should give it a go :gthumb:
    Heh after looking at yours, I might just give it a try.
 
 
 
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