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    Hi all!!

    I have a few questions about the vet universities in U.K.😎

    1.What's the differences between Cambridge and RVC?(that would be great if anyone can tell me the features of each vet school (7 schools?) in U.K.)
    2.I've heard that we can get AVMA, EAEVE, RCVS and AVCB in RVC, but how about Cambridge? Only RCVS?
    3.Is it true that I can work in all commonwealth nations if I graduate the university in U.K?

    Thanks

    P.S.I would be an international students since I'm from Japan and currently live in NZ!(that's why my English is bad, sorry😢)
    Now I'm in year 11 and gonna take IB (International Baccalaureate) next year😉
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    (Original post by Moonie-vet)
    Hi all!!

    I have a few questions about the vet universities in U.K.😎

    1.What's the differences between Cambridge and RVC?(that would be great if anyone can tell me the features of each vet school (7 schools?) in U.K.)
    2.I've heard that we can get AVMA, EAEVE, RCVS and AVCB in RVC, but how about Cambridge? Only RCVS?
    3.Is it true that I can work in all commonwealth nations if I graduate the university in U.K?

    Thanks

    P.S.I would be an international students since I'm from Japan and currently live in NZ!(that's why my English is bad, sorry😢)
    Now I'm in year 11 and gonna take IB (International Baccalaureate) next year😉
    Hey!
    Some answers to your questions:

    Cambridge and RVC offer very different experiences of vet school. Cambridge is small-group teaching, intimate and draws heavily on the intensive and cutting edge research undertaken in the university, especially in the fields of neuroscience and oncology. students get a lot of support, and a compulsory and very useful third year compulsory intercalation. They live by the vet school which is in the city.
    London is a very busy, big vet school where students can find it difficult to get sufficient one to one teaching time. They are also well funded and heavily influenced by research. Their clinical campus is out of London and away from the bright lights but there's a lot to be said for being close to London - though Cambridge is too of course.

    All vet degrees in the UK give you MRCVS and licenses you to practice anywhere in the EU (for now at least, Brexit dependent!). British graduates can also practice in Australia, New Zealand, UAE, Bahrain, Israel and South Africa without board conversion exams (I'm sure there are lots of other countries, but these are the most common grads go to). RVC graduates can do the short form of the NAVLE exam (1 exam) to practice in North America whereas Cambridge graduates have to do the long form (3 exams) - the upside being Cambridge isn't overloaded with students. Having sat the long-form NAVLE it is much more difficult but the benefits of going to Cambridge over London were still worth it for me. Not for everyone though
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    TSR Support Team
    Just to give a bit more insight regarding the London side of things...

    While the RVC's cohorts are the biggest of any vet school in the UK, the only classes that are taught to everybody at the same time are lectures. For other classes, including directed learning (essentially seminars), labs, dissections, point to points (anatomy classes) and integrated structure and function (also anatomy, but a bit more applied and on live animals) we are broken down into much smaller groups. We are in tutor groups of 6 people, and our DL groups (also 6) and dissection groups (4) are changed each year to encourage mingling between people. At the end of modules lecturers will normally hold drop-in Q&A sessions and are reachable by email and in their offices, so there is plenty of opportunity for 1:1 teaching if required.

    For me one of the main draws to the RVC was the teaching on exotics. We have several specialists at the Beaumont animal hospital in Camden who are really well known in the industry and who give lectures. In addition to the Beaumont we have the Queen Mother Hospital for Animal, which is the biggest veterinary hospital in Europe. They do all sorts of referrals so you'll be taught by experts in their field. Location wise, I think that the RVC is really lucky, even Potters Bar is only 16 minutes from Kings X on the train. Being in London provides all sorts of opportunity in terms of leisure (parks, theatres, concerts, cinemas and other events, many are free if you know where to look), employment (loads of people have a part time job, e.g. as a pet sitter, barstaff, retail etc), placements (e.g. urban farms, London zoo, the Heathrow Animal Reception Centre) and more. As you have identified, the RVC one of the most highly accredited vet schools in the UK (we're tied with Glasgow and Edinburgh in being the highest). The QS world rankings puts the RVC as the third best vet school in the world (behind two in the UK), although I would recommend taking league tables with a grain of salt.

    At the end of the day different places will suit different people and I would really recommend doing as much research as possible; going to open days, emailing admissions staff your questions and making the most of campus tours if you have your interviews here (they may do them abroad if you are an international applicant). Both the RVC and Cambridge are great vet schools but I knew that I made the right decision to go to the RVC. I never even entertained the idea of applying to Cambridge because I knew I wouldn't fit in there due to my background, I didn't like their emphasis on grades as opposed to the more practical elements of a veterinary application, I thought the influence the university have over your life is quite oppressive and unnecessary (i.e. I have heard that you are not allowed a car or a part time job!?), and I found some students really rude when I went there on a visit (albeit for another subject; students were making disparaging comments about myself and other female classmates being there for a physics event :eyeball: ). Those were just my opinions though, and the university suits other people down to the ground.
 
 
 
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