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I'm so lost how the heck do I become a lawyer what do I do help me :D Watch

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    Hey guys!

    As the title suggests - I'm lost. Like soooo lost.
    I'm going to be studying Law from this year on in London, and I am a teeny-tiny bit unsure of how things work during and after the LLB course. Thing is, I'm not from the UK, and the legal system, getting a job, etc, are very different in my country than they are in the UK. Please help me out!

    I'm good until... enrollment, I suppose. But then, then come the parts with internships, vacation schemes, the LPC, GDL, and other such things that make matters for me a bit hard to understand.

    I would like to work at a big firm, that is not necessarily tied only to the UK (#brexit). The role of a barrister seems more appealing to me than that of a solicitor. and that's all I'm sure of. How do the things with the Inns work? Do I have to enroll at one to do the LPC? Because I have read on the website of a few firms that they help you with your LPC, or, in some cases, they want you to do something like the LPC, but different. How does that work then?

    And what are vacation schemes? When do you enroll? Do you only do those during the summer after you graduated? And when can you apply for a training contract? How do those work?

    Also, lastly, do I have to do an LLM if I wanna practice law? Or is that more for people in the academia?

    I'm so sorry.

    Thank you all!
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    (Original post by JamestheGreat)
    Hey guys!

    As the title suggests - I'm lost. Like soooo lost.
    I'm going to be studying Law from this year on in London, and I am a teeny-tiny bit unsure of how things work during and after the LLB course. Thing is, I'm not from the UK, and the legal system, getting a job, etc, are very different in my country than they are in the UK. Please help me out!

    I'm good until... enrollment, I suppose. But then, then come the parts with internships, vacation schemes, the LPC, GDL, and other such things that make matters for me a bit hard to understand.

    I would like to work at a big firm, that is not necessarily tied only to the UK (#brexit). The role of a barrister seems more appealing to me than that of a solicitor. and that's all I'm sure of. How do the things with the Inns work? Do I have to enroll at one to do the LPC? Because I have read on the website of a few firms that they help you with your LPC, or, in some cases, they want you to do something like the LPC, but different. How does that work then?

    And what are vacation schemes? When do you enroll? Do you only do those during the summer after you graduated? And when can you apply for a training contract? How do those work?

    Also, lastly, do I have to do an LLM if I wanna practice law? Or is that more for people in the academia?

    I'm so sorry.

    Thank you all!
    Ok first things first, you need to understand a solicitor and and barrister are two different careers in the UK, with two different qualification routes. You need to research into this more and read into it as it is all too long to explain here. Go and read some sites like this:

    http://ultimatelawguide.com/careers/...barrister.html

    https://www.thelawyerportal.com/free...itor-quiz-one/

    https://www.lawcareers.net/Informati...-but-Different

    https://www.oxford-royale.co.uk/arti...eer-paths.html

    If being a barrister is more appealing, then you need to look into the BPTC rather than the LPC, mini-pupillages instead of vacation schemes, you won't work at a firm, but instead a chambers. As I understand it, opportunities to work internationally as a barrister are probably more limited than that of a solicitor, the latter tends to be more cross jursidictional (someone please correct me if that is wrong though).

    As you are studying law, you don't need to worry about the GDL whatever route you take though. And whatever route you take you generally don't need an LLM. It might help in some niche areas of law or the most prestigious chambers, but for most legal roles it is not needed at all.

    Start going to some careers events at your university in October. Speak to people and work out which route would suit you best. You will soon get up to speed on things, and I am sure plenty of your student cohort, as well as academics and student services will be able to help guide you along the way.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    As I understand it, opportunities to work internationally as a barrister are probably more limited than that of a solicitor, the latter tends to be more cross jursidictional (someone please correct me if that is wrong though).
    You're not wrong. There are opportunities to work internationally as a barrister, but they are far more limited compared to solicitors. You can secure work as a barrister in other jurisdictions, but cross jurisdictional work tends to be limited to the more high powered commercial and international law sets in London. I don't have first hand experience of it, and only know of it fleetingly from other barristers that I know that have done it, so others may be able to give more specific examples, but it seems to me to be something that would be very difficult to rely on.
 
 
 
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