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Britain to ban sale of all new petrol and diesel cars and vans from 2040 Watch

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    Britain to ban sale of all diesel and petrol cars and vans from 2040

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...y_to_clipboard

    what do you think?
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    About time. Though it may (ironically) make the car more affordable as by that time, they would not only be electric, but automated to the point that most driving instructors would be out of work.
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    Another example of state interference. Let individuals make decision about the engines in there cars.
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    (Original post by Whiskey&Freedom)
    Another example of state interference. Let individuals make decision about the engines in there cars.
    And allow everyone with a lung condition to sue anyone who has ever driven a petrol car within 200 metres of them? One corollary of freedom is being responsible for any harm one does.
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    I'm a petrol head, so by 40 years time I will be moving out of Britain 😂
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    (Original post by Jahir)
    I'm a petrol head, so by 40 years time I will be moving out of Britain 😂
    You are missing a trick. Some of the electric sport cars are awesome.
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    The government doesn't know what's happening in 6 months time, let alone 23 years. It's meaningless, gesture politics.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And allow everyone with a lung condition to sue anyone who has ever driven a petrol car within 200 metres of them? One corollary of freedom is being responsible for any harm one does.
    Nulli, he got 'their' and 'there' mixed up: the nuance of your argument is going to be lost, I fear.
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    I wonder where all these highly toxic lithium ion batteries are going to be coming from and when we are going to have our first disaster with them.

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    The Guardian article originally said '2020' lol. They edited that one out pretty quickly.

    Can't see there being much of an issue - a lot of petrol cars will have been phased out by then either due to fuel costs, electric-car subsidies, clean air zones, and the fuel tax. I suspect that this is a response to that ClientEarth lawsuit.
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    (Original post by Jahir)
    I'm a petrol head, so by 40 years time I will be moving out of Britain 😂
    Tesla Model S P100D

    And who knows what there will be in 5 or 10 years.

    Although self driving will also be much more prevalent by 2040, so track days will be even more of a thing...

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    Sounds like greenwash to me - nobody is going to want to drive a petrol or diesel car in 2040.
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    Meaningless gesture.
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    Doubt it'll happen
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    It is inevitable even if the timing and way in which change is driven were both unknowns - but it's becoming a lot clearer.

    We know now that air pollution and Climate Change are the dominant factors which are being used to wean the public off dependence on fossil fuels. For several decades now the momentum of that message has increased.

    Perhaps less well understood is the threat that comes from the sources and supply of oil in the Middle East. The strategic importance of protecting international shipping lanes used for the bulk transportation of this commodity and the costs and difficulty of doing so, are not lost to governments and military planners tasked with ensuring continuity of supply.

    The strategic importance of increasingly heavily contested waters is somewhat lost in the media fog of war with Daesh and terrorism; the Arabian Gulf, Persian Gulf, Aden Gulf, Red Sea and now the latest challenges from the Russian presence and the building of significant strategic naval capability at Tartus, Syria, on the Mediterranean Sea, are all indicative of the tactical moves on several fronts played out by those dependent on the continuity of supply or consumption.

    The tactical exploitation by Putin to ensure Bashar al-Assad remained in power is merely the method he has used to advance Russian strategic military capability in the region.

    So now we have a time frame and a milestone that by the mid 2050's, Europe and the UK at least will be largely free from oil dependence.

    The Middle East is a powder keg and now in terminal decline. The unimaginable wealth brought to these countries as a result of oil, has almost all been squandered by tribalism, feuding, vanity projects, corruption and war.

    The transition from petrochemicals as an energy source had to wait until the alternative technologies matured and were taken up by the industrial global leaders. That they are now doing so is simply the publicised signal for conversion of national infrastructure to accommodate the demands.

    Distributed energy storage, cessation of petrol and diesel engine production, the move to green and sustainable energy sources, smarter management of electricity supply and demand, public financial incentives, continued feeds of Climate Change effects and focus, clean air, driverless cars; all of these are part of the same game aim: energy security and protection of remaining oil reserves for the equally important petrochemical derivative products.

    It's a good thing, on so many fronts.
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    In my opinion, this is the right way forward after following France; and not just for because of the increased environmental concerns expressed in the past decade.


    It's important to develop such technologies now before our finite sources of fossil fuels is depleted: then what do we do?


    This also brings up the topic of sustainability: fossil fuels will eventually cease to meet world demands. electricity however can be produced in surplus supplies fairly easily.


    It might also bring an interest into implenting hydrogen fuel as a possible fuel but I'm not a big fan of that.
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    so does that mean I have to buy a Tesla?
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    UK government announces plans to close stable door after the horse has bolted.
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    (Original post by comebackseason)
    so does that mean I have to buy a Tesla?
    Or a MINI.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Or a MINI.

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    The Model S is stunning but I don't see many of them around in the UK. Originally I'm from North America and you would see at least one on a normal day of just being on the road for an hour..

    electric vehicles just aren't very popular out here.
 
 
 
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