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What misconceptions do people have about your condition(s)? Watch

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    (Original post by jessiexlong)
    Some people, when I talk to them, make me extremely tired because I'm so awkward and scared of messing up the conversation (if this was the sims they'd be depleting my social bar instead of filling it), whereas with other people I'm more comfortable and they don't exhaust me as much.
    Ahhh I was blind now I see, lol.
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    (Original post by harrythomas14)
    Ahhh I was blind now I see, lol.
    It's okay, I wasn't exactly clear the first time round 😂
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    That they know or can handle crazy ... ~ .-.

    xd
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    (Original post by Sammylou40)
    I have an "invisible " disability
    It an awful way to live
    Using my blue badge gets me shouted st a LOT by old folks!
    One told me I don't look like a cripple and another RAN across the car park to tell me I'd to move because he wanted my space!!!!
    :hugs:That sucks. It's not fun having to justify to people that you're ill and must be terrible to have to do to strangers on a regular basis, especially when you have the badge and everything- it's not like they just hand them out for nothing.
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    (Original post by Sammylou40)
    I have an "invisible " disability
    It an awful way to live
    Using my blue badge gets me shouted st a LOT by old folks!
    One told me I don't look like a cripple and another RAN across the car park to tell me I'd to move because he wanted my space!!!!
    I agree with you 100 per cent here. I also have an invisible illness and it's really quite annoying. :heart:
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    Dyslexia = but you read a lot, how can you read if you have dyslexia..... I can read, I can't read out loud because I loose the lines without even noticing it, and I can write the same word 5 times 5 different ways, all wrong... I just remember how to write every single word I write, unlike others who just do it naturally at some point, I do it like I first learn to write, using my memory. That is the reason I have a lot of mistakes when I am angry or tired or too emotional when I write.

    Migraines = just take advil or acamol (paracetamol). no, they don't help... advil may help the headache, not the blurry eyesight and the light and sound sensitivity. Lucky for me I don't have nausea often .

    Torn ACL = how are you walking without a cane/brace/wealchair...(just kidding here). like it is not that there is nothing left to support the structure of the joint.

    Anxiety = (it is not really a misconception, more of not knowing how to deal with someone having an anxiety episode), it doesn't have to be something serious to trigger an anxiety episode (I am not calling it anxiety attacks because attacks are more serious). It can be something very small to make me want to cry or be alone or something like that. People often react like : "oh, it is so stupid to cry over something so insignificant like your hair is dyed not exactly the color you wanted or there is a sauce smudge on your shirt and you are having an interview or presentation. Or treat me like a little child after an episode. I learnt to deal with it pretty well over the years though.
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    (Original post by jessiexlong)
    People like to assume that pet/animal allergies aren't a big deal when I ask if they have any pets I'm allergic to, which they are because I have almost died once because of an allergic reaction! There's also the typical "you're probably not allergic to my {pet}", well I won't know until I'm struggling to breathe mate.
    I have a friend that actually asks me to change cloths to her cloths before getting into her room because she is alergic to cats (and I have a Persian cat). She takes a lot of meds before meeting me otherwise.
    When we first met our interuction was, she started doing some acro-yoga exercises with me and than she askes me "do you have cats? or is this the grass here." I didn't understood what she meant at first. then she said she is so sorry but she can't practice with me because she is alergic to my cloths.... My cats really like sleeping on my cloths, especially the Persian.
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    I also have an Autoimmune disease (another name for a wolf - u can guess which one) and people think it's all going to be fine with immunosuppressants but they don't know taking immunosuppressants has really nasty side effects and sometimes worse than my actual condition so it's really a compromise I have to make.
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    (Original post by Ediesedgewick)
    I also have an Autoimmune disease (another name for a wolf - u can guess which one) and people think it's all going to be fine with immunosuppressants but they don't know taking immunosuppressants has really nasty side effects and sometimes worse than my actual condition so it's really a compromise I have to make.
    Lupus? (lupin)
    Oh yeah immunosuppressants sound like they totally don't mess with your immune system or anything. And hey it's not like you need an immune system anyway.
    Btw, have you checked out the lupusUK forum? Might be nice to talk with people who have the same condition.
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    (Original post by Kathy89)
    Dyslexia = but you read a lot, how can you read if you have dyslexia..... I can read, I can't read out loud because I loose the lines without even noticing it, and I can write the same word 5 times 5 different ways, all wrong... I just remember how to write every single word I write, unlike others who just do it naturally at some point, I do it like I first learn to write, using my memory. That is the reason I have a lot of mistakes when I am angry or tired or too emotional when I write.

    Migraines = just take advil or acamol (paracetamol). no, they don't help... advil may help the headache, not the blurry eyesight and the light and sound sensitivity. Lucky for me I don't have nausea often .

    Torn ACL = how are you walking without a cane/brace/wealchair...(just kidding here). like it is not that there is nothing left to support the structure of the joint.

    Anxiety = (it is not really a misconception, more of not knowing how to deal with someone having an anxiety episode), it doesn't have to be something serious to trigger an anxiety episode (I am not calling it anxiety attacks because attacks are more serious). It can be something very small to make me want to cry or be alone or something like that. People often react like : "oh, it is so stupid to cry over something so insignificant like your hair is dyed not exactly the color you wanted or there is a sauce smudge on your shirt and you are having an interview or presentation. Or treat me like a little child after an episode. I learnt to deal with it pretty well over the years though.
    I had a doctor say to me recently "but dyslexics can read. They just can't write" when I mentioned that I don't read much cos of mine. I wouldn't mind that too muc from jo public, but come on you're a bloody doctor. Can you not respect the diagnosis given by a specialist?

    I don't want to do that "oh just eat kale" thing, but have you tried seeing an osteopath for your migraines? My bf saw an osteo for something totally unrelated, but when he mentioned migraines they asked if they could stick needles in his head (as in acupuncture).
    Poor bf has tried a lot of painkillers etc with no luck so decided to go for it. After just one treatment he's so much better. Gone from multiple migraines a year to maybe one in the at least a year since the treatment (and even then it wasn't as serious as usual).
    Not saying it'll be a magic cure cos migraines have different causes and all, but if yours are caused by the same his are (I think it's to do with pressure on nerves or something) then it could be well worth it.

    Anxiety is getting worked up over stuff you shouldn't. It's like the whole freaking point. If you only got anxious over reasonable stuff it would be called "reasonable reaction". I hate it when people try to point out to somebody who's anxious/ depressed that it's illogical. They probably know it is. Doesn't make them feel any better though. In fact it could make them feel worse cos they feel stupid now too.
    I don't have particular mh issues any more, but have previously and can still have the odd moment. At one point I would cry hysterically every night for literally no reason. Saying "there's nothing to cry about" isn't exactly going to help that.
    Luckily I met somebody who just accepts that i'm a bit of a mess and doesn't judge me (even if we do joke about it a little). It can help so much to just have one person who isn't a complete idiot that can make you feel less crazy.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    I had a doctor say to me recently "but dyslexics can read. They just can't write" when I mentioned that I don't read much cos of mine. I wouldn't mind that too muc from jo public, but come on you're a bloody doctor. Can you not respect the diagnosis given by a specialist?

    I don't want to do that "oh just eat kale" thing, but have you tried seeing an osteopath for your migraines? My bf saw an osteo for something totally unrelated, but when he mentioned migraines they asked if they could stick needles in his head (as in acupuncture).
    Poor bf has tried a lot of painkillers etc with no luck so decided to go for it. After just one treatment he's so much better. Gone from multiple migraines a year to maybe one in the at least a year since the treatment (and even then it wasn't as serious as usual).
    Not saying it'll be a magic cure cos migraines have different causes and all, but if yours are caused by the same his are (I think it's to do with pressure on nerves or something) then it could be well worth it.

    Anxiety is getting worked up over stuff you shouldn't. It's like the whole freaking point. If you only got anxious over reasonable stuff it would be called "reasonable reaction". I hate it when people try to point out to somebody who's anxious/ depressed that it's illogical. They probably know it is. Doesn't make them feel any better though. In fact it could make them feel worse cos they feel stupid now too.
    I don't have particular mh issues any more, but have previously and can still have the odd moment. At one point I would cry hysterically every night for literally no reason. Saying "there's nothing to cry about" isn't exactly going to help that.
    Luckily I met somebody who just accepts that i'm a bit of a mess and doesn't judge me (even if we do joke about it a little). It can help so much to just have one person who isn't a complete idiot that can make you feel less crazy.
    1. As for dyslexia, I was diagnosed only in my 20's when I was studying in university. I was always a good student but it took me a lot more effort that my brother, I always blamed my eyesight and my anxiety for having troubles reading out loud. I read fast (when having the optimal correction). As for my mistakes while writing, my parents and teachers just made me learn harder.... XD
    It is not serious as others have, but it makes things clearer when you have the diagnosis and not look at the wrong places to solve it.
    2. As for migraines, being vegan helped a lot with that. And practicing relaxation techniques.
    It took time to learn what triggers the migraines, but once you know it you can prevent a lot of them.

    3. I found out that explaining things and conditions to people in the way they can understand them is very helpful. When I start working in a certain place I would explain people that I have anxiety issues, and the right thing to do is just doing nothing. I learned to calm myself, it will take some time but I'll be fine. The most dificult "condition" for me is being vegan... XD
    But seriously, anxiety and depression are the hardest things for normal people to understand. They often come to a sad person and ask :"why are you so depressed?" .... man, sadness is not even close to depression.
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    (Original post by Kathy89)
    1. As for dyslexia, I was diagnosed only in my 20's when I was studying in university. I was always a good student but it took me a lot more effort that my brother, I always blamed my eyesight and my anxiety for having troubles reading out loud. I read fast (when having the optimal correction). As for my mistakes while writing, my parents and teachers just made me learn harder.... XD
    It is not serious as others have, but it makes things clearer when you have the diagnosis and not look at the wrong places to solve it.
    2. As for migraines, being vegan helped a lot with that. And practicing relaxation techniques.
    It took time to learn what triggers the migraines, but once you know it you can prevent a lot of them.

    3. I found out that explaining things and conditions to people in the way they can understand them is very helpful. When I start working in a certain place I would explain people that I have anxiety issues, and the right thing to do is just doing nothing. I learned to calm myself, it will take some time but I'll be fine. The most dificult "condition" for me is being vegan... XD
    But seriously, anxiety and depression are the hardest things for normal people to understand. They often come to a sad person and ask :"why are you so depressed?" .... man, sadness is not even close to depression.
    My dyslexia generally isn't too bad, but I do have some issues reading and with mixing up some words (brown and grey is a common mix up which is odd).
    Again, I got diagnosed late on (at the start of uni) and was generally smart (despite some issues at junior school).
    I also have ADD though so i'm not always sure what comes from which thing. I think my reading issues are a mix between the two as I can read things i'm interested in a lot easier.

    Yeah explanation is very important. It's a shame that people have to explain a lot of things, but to be fair I had no idea what depression/ OCD/ Dyslexia/ ADD etc were before I realised I had them and had misconceptions about some of them myself.
    What annoys me is when people think they know more about your condition than you do. I don't really mind people not knowing something as long as they appreciate that they don't and are willing to learn.
    It actually really annoys me when my mum tries to give me advice. Or when she tells me "I was reading an article and thyroid problems can cause gut issues" despite me having told her that before and her ignoring or dismissing me. It's like she trusts a 5min google search over me.

    Also annoys me when people bug you too much for info. My mum always probes me with questions when I say I'm feeling ill and it just feels like she's trying to diagnose me or something. Just accept that I feel ill and move on. You know what my conditions are already so you don't need to ask for details each time!

    What really grinds my gears though is selective caring. Like they'll care about my problems when it suits them, but when they want to eat at an Indian restaurant they'll totally ignore by IBS and my telling them that eating there will cause me pain.

    Oh wow that turned into a rant. Sorry about that :blushing:
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    One of the most annoying ones for me is when people hear I have OCD and say "oh do you clean a lot then"

    I mean, I can understand since people see OCD as a need to be neat and tidy but it sometimes isn't that.

    Makes me cringe hearing that
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    My dyslexia generally isn't too bad, but I do have some issues reading and with mixing up some words (brown and grey is a common mix up which is odd).
    Again, I got diagnosed late on (at the start of uni) and was generally smart (despite some issues at junior school).
    I also have ADD though so i'm not always sure what comes from which thing. I think my reading issues are a mix between the two as I can read things i'm interested in a lot easier.

    Yeah explanation is very important. It's a shame that people have to explain a lot of things, but to be fair I had no idea what depression/ OCD/ Dyslexia/ ADD etc were before I realised I had them and had misconceptions about some of them myself.
    What annoys me is when people think they know more about your condition than you do. I don't really mind people not knowing something as long as they appreciate that they don't and are willing to learn.
    It actually really annoys me when my mum tries to give me advice. Or when she tells me "I was reading an article and thyroid problems can cause gut issues" despite me having told her that before and her ignoring or dismissing me. It's like she trusts a 5min google search over me.

    Also annoys me when people bug you too much for info. My mum always probes me with questions when I say I'm feeling ill and it just feels like she's trying to diagnose me or something. Just accept that I feel ill and move on. You know what my conditions are already so you don't need to ask for details each time!

    What really grinds my gears though is selective caring. Like they'll care about my problems when it suits them, but when they want to eat at an Indian restaurant they'll totally ignore by IBS and my telling them that eating there will cause me pain.

    Oh wow that turned into a rant. Sorry about that :blushing:
    That's fine, rant about it.
    I see it a bit differently, they do care about you, just not understanding.

    I can't believe my mum who has 2nd degree in education and psychology couldn't see my depression and anxiety.
    I can see people often seem to ignore some information about other's conditions (I am sure I do it too), not because they don't care, just because they don't realize it. When I meet someone with a certain disability or condition I sometimes ask too much questions trying to understand more things and when I realize how it looks it makes me feel ashamed.... it is like: oh, you have XYZ should I treat you any different to make you feel bad about having a condition I can't understand.
    I notice it online more often.



    (Original post by XLittleSparrowX)
    One of the most annoying ones for me is when people hear I have OCD and say "oh do you clean a lot then"

    I mean, I can understand since people see OCD as a need to be neat and tidy but it sometimes isn't that.

    Makes me cringe hearing that
    Try that: "No, it's Obsessive Compulsive Order you are talking about, I have Obsessive Compulsive DIS-Order, I am obsessed with mess".
    Although it may sound stupid and funny (a bit), it will make people understand that there are many kinds of OCD much easier. You can explain people where and how your OCD shows. I met a guy who had a counting OCD, he was always counting. We were walking and talking he was counting his steps.
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    (Original post by Kathy89)
    That's fine, rant about it.
    I see it a bit differently, they do care about you, just not understanding.

    I can't believe my mum who has 2nd degree in education and psychology couldn't see my depression and anxiety.
    I can see people often seem to ignore some information about other's conditions (I am sure I do it too), not because they don't care, just because they don't realize it. When I meet someone with a certain disability or condition I sometimes ask too much questions trying to understand more things and when I realize how it looks it makes me feel ashamed.... it is like: oh, you have XYZ should I treat you any different to make you feel bad about having a condition I can't understand.
    I notice it online more often.
    Yeah. They do care too. It's so nice to hear you say that stuff cos sometimes I feel like (some) people with issues expect too much of people. I may get annoyed and rant about some things people do, but really as long as they aren't being super ignorant or deliberately mean it's cool.
    I do think people with illnesses have to realise that the general public doesn't know everting they do about their condition and can make mistakes with the best intentions.
    You've still got every right to be pissed of by it, but just don't blame the person.

    I often have to stop myself asking too much cos I just want to make sure I'm not misinterpreting it. And I've had misconceptions about my own conditions so I can totally understand that others do too.

    People just need to try and be willing to accept when they're wrong without getting defensive. If people can do that on both sides I think it works out pretty well. Like in threads like this, people don't know everything about each others conditions, but can all just generally sympathise with some stuff and accept what each other are saying even if they don't really understand it. It gives me hope that the world is generally a nice place.
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    (Original post by Kathy89)
    Migraines = just take advil or acamol (paracetamol). no, they don't help... advil may help the headache, not the blurry eyesight and the light and sound sensitivity. Lucky for me I don't have nausea often.
    Agreed! Paracetamol works if I've got a headache; but doesn't help migraine pain. Heck, most migraine medication doesn't work for me. I usually end up sleeping it off. (assuming it's not due to lack of food or water)
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    "Aren't schizophrenics dangerous? Should you even be out here? Like for your own sake?"
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Agreed! Paracetamol works if I've got a headache; but doesn't help migraine pain. Heck, most migraine medication doesn't work for me. I usually end up sleeping it off. (assuming it's not due to lack of food or water)
    for me drinking water sometimes made it even worse, it made me nauseous.
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    (Original post by ItzBunnie)
    "Aren't schizophrenics dangerous? Should you even be out here? Like for your own sake?"
    I was once told that when I had depression. I remember reading somewhere that those of us with mental health issues are more likely to be attacked than actually attack others.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I was once told that when I had depression. I remember reading somewhere that those of us with mental health issues are more likely to be attacked than actually attack others.
    I'm sorry to hear :/ I've just refused to tell people now adays and keep things to myself, it's a lot easier.
 
 
 
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