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Do you think there is any chance that tuition fees in England will go down? Watch

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    I have noticed increased discussion recently in the media (after this years election) about tuition fees in England.

    Here are some interesting articles:

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...-andrew-adonis

    https://www.theguardian.com/higher-e...y-tuition-fees

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-40569202

    Realistically do you think there is any possibility the fees will come down in the next few years?

    (The reason why I ask is because I'm in my twenties and I am considering going back to education as a mature student, I have been looking at English universities but the tuition fees in England are very very high in my opinion.)

    Thanks
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    I'm in a similar boat - I will go to uni in a couple years and am really hoping for tuition fees to reduce. However, realistically, I really doubt it. The government have different priorities (such as the NHS and public service pay) that, at the moment at least, get a lot more publicity.

    The white paper of allowing high performing unis to increase fees (I highly disagree with this and think it should be underperforming units having to reduce fees) appears popular with the government so that's a distinct possibility.

    Also, the government have grown accustomed to the reduced money they have to spend on unis, so reducing tuition fees for the government to fund is even less likely.

    What I think is more of a possibility, is that they will change how the debt works, perhaps with fixed interest or a time limit.

    Hope that helps.
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    NO. Labour are never getting in, no matter what the liberals say, and the Tories thankfully have no plans to lower the fees.

    In an ideal world the fee cap would be lifted and they'd be set on a basis of supply and demand.
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    All I know is that I will be slightly annoyed if they reduce it the year after I leave uni haha
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    They should be reduced but not scrapped.
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    I think we have to be real, left-wing, right-wing, central, whatever you are, this isn't boiled down to party politics alone, but a matter of advancement.

    Arguably Unis, especially those in the Western World, have some of the best facilities in the world, the best technology amongst others, obviously to be able to hire the best staff to teach you to run the best technology in the best facilities will run you down a pretty penny right? Fees.

    Now it's understandable and right that fees should be reduced a little, as money could be gained from elsewhere, but scrapping entirely? Frankly, that's quite unsustainable.

    On the contrary however, you do have universities in Denmark, Finland who offer free university tuition to their students, renowned for having a very top quality education system, and good facilities also.

    We may never know, anyways, fees won't likely be properly fixed by the time we get to university, so it's best if we just deal with it.
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    I have noticed increased discussion recently in the media (after this years election) about tuition fees in England.

    Here are some interesting articles:

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...-andrew-adonis

    https://www.theguardian.com/higher-e...y-tuition-fees

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-40569202

    Realistically do you think there is any possibility the fees will come down in the next few years?

    (The reason why I ask is because I'm in my twenties and I am considering going back to education as a mature student, I have been looking at English universities but the tuition fees in England are very very high in my opinion.)

    Thanks
    There are no votes in reducing (as opposed to abolishing) fees so no political party will try to construct a funding policy on the basis of lower fees.

    Universities may try market segmentation by keeping fees at the present high level to students from existing backgrounds but with lower fees to classes of people won't come because of fee levels. True mature students have been vanishing like spring snow from the higher education scene and universities may try and find ways to lure them back to courses which cost little to provide.
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    With the conservatives in power and brexit, it will increase. They need all the money they can get
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    no. granted they look bloody expensive on paper but realistically, you barely notice the money taken out over your working lifetime. if you have a salary of 21k, you pay something like £38 a month, barely anything.

    your degree is an investment for you; especially in the UK where we host leading universities hence the high tuition fees.
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    Imo no. but they may redesign the system to collect the money in a different way.
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    no. granted they look bloody expensive on paper but realistically, you barely notice the money taken out over your working lifetime. if you have a salary of 21k, you pay something like £38 a month, barely anything.

    your degree is an investment for you; especially in the UK where we host leading universities hence the high tuition fees.
    That's true if you have that salary, but anything over £30k and you really will notice payments.
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    (Original post by james813)
    That's true if you have that salary, but anything over £30k and you really will notice payments.
    Which is often the problem for mature students who have a significant earning capacity but consider that a degree will help them climb a management ladder.
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    (Original post by james813)
    That's true if you have that salary, but anything over £30k and you really will notice payments.
    You wouldn't, because you're also earning more. Even if you have a couple of hundred deducted, it's still a fraction of your monthly pay, as it's only ever 9%. On £50k you only repay £217 a month, which is nothing; you're still taking home almost £3k a month.

    Personally I have no issue with the way the loan is working, though I wish they'd just stop using the backhanded language and call it a student tax rather than a loan. The effects of debt on mental health are well documented too, so why they'd continue to refer to it as a debt I don't understand.

    I didn't disagree with Labour's idea of funding a reduction on the student's side by raising corporate tax, but think that idea has a little bit of refining to go until it's actually practicable.
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    (Original post by james813)
    That's true if you have that salary, but anything over £30k and you really will notice payments.
    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    You wouldn't, because you're also earning more. Even if you have a couple of hundred deducted, it's still a fraction of your monthly pay, as it's only ever 9%. On £50k you only repay £217 a month, which is nothing; you're still taking home almost £3k a month.

    Personally I have no issue with the way the loan is working, though I wish they'd just stop using the backhanded language and call it a student tax rather than a loan. The effects of debt on mental health are well documented too, so why they'd continue to refer to it as a debt I don't understand.

    I didn't disagree with Labour's idea of funding a reduction on the student's side by raising corporate tax, but think that idea has a little bit of refining to go until it's actually practicable.
    This. your repayment per month is all relative
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    (Original post by Dot.Cotton)
    NO. Labour are never getting in, no matter what the liberals say, and the Tories thankfully have no plans to lower the fees.

    In an ideal world the fee cap would be lifted and they'd be set on a basis of supply and demand.
    You do realise that institutions being able to set their own tuition rates can be disastrous. In the USA a prestigious university can cost $50000/year in just tuition alone.

    http://www.northwestern.edu/sfs/tuit...ate/index.html
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    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    You wouldn't, because you're also earning more. Even if you have a couple of hundred deducted, it's still a fraction of your monthly pay, as it's only ever 9%. On £50k you only repay £217 a month, which is nothing; you're still taking home almost £3k a month.

    Personally I have no issue with the way the loan is working, though I wish they'd just stop using the backhanded language and call it a student tax rather than a loan. The effects of debt on mental health are well documented too, so why they'd continue to refer to it as a debt I don't understand.

    I didn't disagree with Labour's idea of funding a reduction on the student's side by raising corporate tax, but think that idea has a little bit of refining to go until it's actually practicable.
    The loans are actually a huge fail since most people don't even pay them back fully anyway. If that is the case as a whole why not just decrease the tuition
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    Well recently the fee has increased yet again (to 9250). Anyone know why? Anyway I doubt it.
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    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    You wouldn't, because you're also earning more. Even if you have a couple of hundred deducted, it's still a fraction of your monthly pay, as it's only ever 9%. On £50k you only repay £217 a month, which is nothing; you're still taking home almost £3k a month.

    Personally I have no issue with the way the loan is working, though I wish they'd just stop using the backhanded language and call it a student tax rather than a loan. The effects of debt on mental health are well documented too, so why they'd continue to refer to it as a debt I don't understand.

    I didn't disagree with Labour's idea of funding a reduction on the student's side by raising corporate tax, but think that idea has a little bit of refining to go until it's actually practicable.
    No, because there is a difference between paying almost 0 at the threshold, and paying hundreds every month, especially with 6% interest rate. Of course you are keeping more money but may have more expenses and will be far worse off than someone earning the same without repayments.
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    (Original post by james813)
    No, because there is a difference between paying almost 0 at the threshold, and paying hundreds every month, especially with 6% interest rate. Of course you are keeping more money but may have more expenses and will be far worse off than someone earning the same without repayments.
    I don't think earning 9% less, such as the quoted example figure of £217 off a £3k a month packet, constitutes far worse off 😂
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    No, nor do I think it should.

    The people who take advantage of higher education should bear the cost of it. Only people who end up in well-paying jobs will ever chip into their tuition-fee debt, either. It's a completely fair system.
 
 
 
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