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Do you think there is any chance that tuition fees in England will go down? Watch

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    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    Well recently the fee has increased yet again (to 9250). Anyone know why? Anyway I doubt it.
    They were supposed to increase based on teaching standards until 2020, instead It’s just increasing with inflation so expect next year to be even more since it’ll be compound + high inflation this year. Apparently the teaching standards system will come in place in 2020 so expect it to go higher and higher - although given this past election I wouldn’t be surprised if they scrapped hikes (it’d be wise.)
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    if you have a salary of 21k, you pay something like £38 a month, barely anything.
    Where are you getting those figures? I was under the impression you pay back 9% of your salary. I hear people constantly plucking figures out of the air of £18 a month or £38 a month. If it's 9% that's quite a lot more than £38.

    21,000 / 12 = 1,750.
    9% of that is £157.50 a month.

    Am I wrong in thinking it's 9% or have you just made that number up?


    EDIT:

    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    Even if you have a couple of hundred deducted, it's still a fraction of your monthly pay, as it's only ever 9%. On £50k you only repay £217 a month, which is nothing; you're still taking home almost £3k a month.
    I'm not the only one to believe it's 9% then, but is it 9% if you're earning x amount and a different percentage if it's another?
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    (Original post by Whispers)
    Where are you getting those figures? I was under the impression you pay back 9% of your salary. I hear people constantly plucking figures out of the air of £18 a month or £38 a month. If it's 9% that's quite a lot more than £38.

    21,000 / 12 = 1,750.
    9% of that is £157.50 a month.

    Am I wrong in thinking it's 9% or have you just made that number up?


    EDIT:



    I'm not the only one to believe it's 9% then, but is it 9% if you're earning x amount and a different percentage if it's another?
    X amount after £21,000.
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    (Original post by Whispers)
    I'm not the only one to believe it's 9% then, but is it 9% if you're earning x amount and a different percentage if it's another?
    Nope, flat 9%. Link to the guidance is in the post you quoted. https://www.gov.uk/repaying-your-stu...n/what-you-pay
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    (Original post by Whispers)
    I'm not the only one to believe it's 9% then, but is it 9% if you're earning x amount and a different percentage if it's another?
    no it's the your salary - 21000

    if I earn £30000 a year, then they don't take 9% of the £30000 but 9% of the the difference between £21000 and £30000 which is £9000. 9% of £9000 is £810 and divide that by 12 to get how much I pay each month (can't do that in my head). very small amount, respectively.
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    (Original post by Whispers)
    I'm not the only one to believe it's 9% then, but is it 9% if you're earning x amount and a different percentage if it's another?
    and you pay £38 if you earn £26000, not £21000
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    Not a chance unless we get a Corbyn led labour government anytime soon.
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    (Original post by Dot.Cotton)
    NO. Labour are never getting in, no matter what the liberals say, and the Tories thankfully have no plans to lower the fees.

    In an ideal world the fee cap would be lifted and they'd be set on a basis of supply and demand.
    Lmfao, Liberals? Educate yourself.

    Cons are never getting a majority now. Labour only grows. Corbyn stands a strong chance. Hate to **** on your delusions darling but Labour only grows while Cons are losing seats left right and center.
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    (Original post by BTAnonymous)
    no it's the your salary - 21000

    if I earn £30000 a year, then they don't take 9% of the £30000 but 9% of the the difference between £21000 and £30000 which is £9000. 9% of £9000 is £810 and divide that by 12 to get how much I pay each month (can't do that in my head). very small amount, respectively.
    Oh I see!! Thank you, I thought I was going crazy as everyone's going around quoting these low numbers and I'm thinking "Where are they getting this from" but this makes total sense. Thank you!

    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    Nope, flat 9%. Link to the guidance is in the post you quoted. https://www.gov.uk/repaying-your-stu...n/what-you-pay
    Thank you very much, I'm understanding it more now
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    (Original post by Whispers)
    Thank you very much, I'm understanding it more now
    np
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    What annoys me is the difference between student maintenance loans. Nobody should be given more than 6k outside of London, imo. I got just over 5k last year whilst one of my friends got 8k. Yet we're both going into the same profession so will be paying back the same percentage of loan per year. So she gets free money that she could invest, and I don't.

    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    You wouldn't, because you're also earning more. Even if you have a couple of hundred deducted, it's still a fraction of your monthly pay, as it's only ever 9%. On £50k you only repay £217 a month, which is nothing; you're still taking home almost £3k a month.

    Personally I have no issue with the way the loan is working, though I wish they'd just stop using the backhanded language and call it a student tax rather than a loan. The effects of debt on mental health are well documented too, so why they'd continue to refer to it as a debt I don't understand.

    I didn't disagree with Labour's idea of funding a reduction on the student's side by raising corporate tax, but think that idea has a little bit of refining to go until it's actually practicable.
    Well I've just had a lot of fun with that website. On 21k, you'd take home £1400 per month. The difference between 21k and 50k sounds enormous, but then, per month, the difference seems far less at £1500. Interesting.:beard:
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    (Original post by james813)
    That's true if you have that salary, but anything over £30k and you really will notice payments.
    A £30k salary would have monthly repayments of £67. That's a starbucks coffee a day.
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    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    I don't think earning 9% less, such as the quoted example figure of £217 off a £3k a month packet, constitutes far worse off 😂
    Maybe that's because you've never had a full time job or mortgage and bills every month.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    What annoys me is the difference between student maintenance loans. Nobody should be given more than 6k outside of London, imo. I got just over 5k last year whilst one of my friends got 8k. Yet we're both going into the same profession so will be paying back the same percentage of loan per year. So she gets free money that she could invest, and I don't.
    You ever thought the reason you think that you could invest said money is the reason you don't get it? And the people who do get it don't have the ability to dispose of it by way of investments?
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    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    Nope, flat 9%. Link to the guidance is in the post you quoted. https://www.gov.uk/repaying-your-stu...n/what-you-pay
    (Original post by james813)
    Maybe that's because you've never had a full time job or mortgage and bills every month.
    It's not a flat 9%. It's 9% on earnings over £21k.
    £3k a month is £36k per year. Student loan repayment is (£36k-£21k) * 9% = £1,350 per year = £112.50 per month.
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    I think they will go up
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    (Original post by james813)
    Maybe that's because you've never had a full time job or mortgage and bills every month.
    :rofl: Do you know me? I've been working for a decade


    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    It's not a flat 9%. It's 9% on earnings over £21k.
    £3k a month is £36k per year. Student loan repayment is (£36k-£21k) * 9% = £1,350 per year = £112.50 per month.
    That's still a flat 9% once you're over the earnings limit. And £3k is your take home after other taxes have gone out. I even embedded links to my sources why is no one looking :cry:
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    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    That's still a flat 9% once you're over the earnings limit. And £3k is your take home after other taxes have gone out. I even embedded links to my sources why is no one looking :cry:
    Ah, soz. You were saying takehome pay not gross pay. My mishtake.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    You ever thought the reason you think that you could invest said money is the reason you don't get it? And the people who do get it don't have the ability to dispose of it by way of investments?
    Anyone can put it into a bank account and earn interest on it.
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    I have noticed increased discussion recently in the media (after this years election) about tuition fees in England.

    Here are some interesting articles:

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...-andrew-adonis

    https://www.theguardian.com/higher-e...y-tuition-fees

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-40569202

    Realistically do you think there is any possibility the fees will come down in the next few years?

    (The reason why I ask is because I'm in my twenties and I am considering going back to education as a mature student, I have been looking at English universities but the tuition fees in England are very very high in my opinion.)

    Thanks
    Clearly you haven't been ignoring most universities that compare to the best universities in the UK if you think our are expensive. I don't see them going down
 
 
 
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