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Do you think there is any chance that tuition fees in England will go down? Watch

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    I don't think they'll go down. Or will be scrapped.

    The system at the moment is unsustainable though. I'll be owing 50k although I appreciate it's only an abstract concept.

    I think there end up being a graduate tax. Something that you pay your entire working life. Which unofficially what it is now really.
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    (Original post by AmeliaLost)
    :rofl: Do you know me? I've been working for a decade
    Nope, that's why I said maybe (although I thought this was a student's forum). You will know then that after living expenses are deducted from your salary tuition fee repayments are significant.
    If you disagree you're welcome to pay me hundreds of pounds every month.
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    (Original post by james813)
    Nope, that's why I said maybe (although I thought this was a student's forum). You will know then that after living expenses are deducted from your salary tuition fee repayments are significant.
    If you disagree you're welcome to pay me hundreds of pounds every month.
    :rolleyes: Thanks for offering to pay my tuition fees though.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    Anyone can put it into a bank account and earn interest on it.
    What I meant by ability was not knowhow. I mean that people who receive that money use it to pay rent, buy food and clothing. They don't have anything left over to invest. The fact that you do have the ability to invest it means you don't need it.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    What annoys me is the difference between student maintenance loans. Nobody should be given more than 6k outside of London, imo. I got just over 5k last year whilst one of my friends got 8k. Yet we're both going into the same profession so will be paying back the same percentage of loan per year. So she gets free money that she could invest, and I don't.
    You want what other people have, and if you can't get it then they shouldn't have it either (it's EMA all over again - the middle classes are never satisfied :argh:). Poor students, unlike you, don't have wealthy parents to fall back on.

    Poor students who have to take out the full maintenance loan end up with much bigger debts, really, there's nothing to be jealous of.
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    (Original post by james813)
    Nope, that's why I said maybe (although I thought this was a student's forum). You will know then that after living expenses are deducted from your salary tuition fee repayments are significant.
    If you disagree you're welcome to pay me hundreds of pounds every month.
    £50k pa = #Top10percentproblems

    http://www.salarygraph.co.uk/

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    That's not my point. If you have a graduate salary you will notice repayments.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    What annoys me is the difference between student maintenance loans. Nobody should be given more than 6k outside of London, imo. I got just over 5k last year whilst one of my friends got 8k. Yet we're both going into the same profession so will be paying back the same percentage of loan per year. So she gets free money that she could invest, and I don't.
    But she'll have to pay it back, which will take longer. And she won't get much if she does invest it.
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    (Original post by james813)
    That's not my point. If you have a graduate salary you will notice repayments.
    And you have a degree.

    Seems a reasonably fair exchange.

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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    What I meant by ability was not knowhow. I mean that people who receive that money use it to pay rent, buy food and clothing. They don't have anything left over to invest. The fact that you do have the ability to invest it means you don't need it.
    Nope. I got through my first year by spending my just over 5k wisely and within my means. I didn't buy many clothes and I didn't get many takeaways or eat out. My friend, who got 8k, lived in the same priced accommodation. Why should she get more? She didn't need that much money! We lived in the same circumstances and I proved it could be done with over 2k less than what she was given.

    (Original post by Snufkin)
    You want what other people have, and if you can't get it then they shouldn't have it either (it's EMA all over again - the middle classes are never satisfied :argh:). Poor students, unlike you, don't have wealthy parents to fall back on.

    Poor students who have to take out the full maintenance loan end up with much bigger debts, really, there's nothing to be jealous of.
    My parents aren't wealthy. They're a nurse and a retired computer engineer. I'm not middle class. My loan was little compared to my friend's because I worked full time for 2 years before uni, saving up, and because my mother worked hard on many night shifts. And my dad's on his pension.

    If people can't afford uni, they need to get a job.

    Judgemental people like you don't help.

    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    But she'll have to pay it back, which will take longer. And she won't get much if she does invest it.
    But she won't. We're going into the same profession, so will be paying the same amount back each year. Then, after thirty years, our debt will be wiped. So won't be paying it back. Even if she didn't invest it, she could splash out if she wanted and live her uni years in luxury :lol: Or, save that 2k each year which would be 6k and put it into a long term ISA and then she would get some money back.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    My loan was little compared to my friend's because I worked full time for 2 years before uni, saving up, and because my mother worked hard on many night shifts. And my dad's on his pension.
    Your personal savings don't affect your loan entitlement.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    Nope. I got through my first year by spending my just over 5k wisely and within my means. I didn't buy many clothes and I didn't get many takeaways or eat out. My friend, who got 8k, lived in the same priced accommodation. Why should she get more? She didn't need that much money! We lived in the same circumstances and I proved it could be done with over 2k less than what she was given.
    Right, so you'll spend exactly the same amount on food, hobbies, books and travel?


    But she won't. We're going into the same profession, so will be paying the same amount back each year. Then, after thirty years, our debt will be wiped. So won't be paying it back. Even if she didn't invest it, she could splash out if she wanted and live her uni years in luxury :lol: Or, save that 2k each year which would be 6k and put it into a long term ISA and then she would get some money back.
    Going into the same profession doesn't mean you'll end up with exactly the same job earning exactly the same amount of money.

    You just sound bitter.

    I got more than the people I lived with at uni. But unlike them, my parents couldn't afford to pay my accommodation or give me £200 a month.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    N
    My parents aren't wealthy. They're a nurse and a retired computer engineer. I'm not middle class. My loan was little compared to my friend's because I worked full time for 2 years before uni, saving up, and because my mother worked hard on many night shifts. And my dad's on his pension.

    If people can't afford uni, they need to get a job.

    Judgemental people like you don't help.
    Come off it. If you're receiving a maintenance loan of 5k then your household income must be around £50,000. That is wealthy. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Your personal savings (or earnings*) don't affect your loan entitlement.

    *And earnings only if you are over 25yo.
    You're wrong there, they are taken into account.
    "If you’re a dependent student, your local authority will take into account the income of your parents or adoptive parents on top of your own income."
    https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles...-time-students

    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Right, so you'll spend exactly the same amount on food, hobbies, books and travel?

    Going into the same profession doesn't mean you'll end up with exactly the same job earning exactly the same amount of money.

    You just sound bitter.

    I got more than the people I lived with at uni. But unlike them, my parents couldn't afford to pay my accommodation or give me £200 a month.
    I spent the bare minimum on food, I didn't do any hobbies, didn't buy any books and went home about three times in the year.

    I am bitter about it, but that doesn't mean the situation isn't wrong.

    My parents didn't pay for my accommodation or give me money. Every single thing I spent came from my 5k, hence my point that that is all one needs.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    Nope. I got through my first year by spending my just over 5k wisely and within my means. I didn't buy many clothes and I didn't get many takeaways or eat out. My friend, who got 8k, lived in the same priced accommodation. Why should she get more? She didn't need that much money! We lived in the same circumstances and I proved it could be done with over 2k less than what she was given.
    These threads always come down to people bragging about their fiscal discipline.

    The point is that you have parents who could give you support, even if they did not. The people in receipt of the full amount have a household income which suggests their parents couldn't give support to their child, even if they wanted to. Those people need to be protected as far as possible.

    Furthermore, 5k wouldn't cover most people's rent never mind their expenditure for the entire year. I assume you either relied on savings or your parents for out-of-term living. If you are telling me you managed to survive over December and the summer on 5k, then you have reason to brag about your fiscal discipline and I salute you.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    You're wrong there, they are taken into account.
    "If you’re a dependent student, your local authority will take into account the income of your parents or adoptive parents on top of your own income."
    https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles...-time-students



    I spent the bare minimum on food, I didn't do any hobbies, didn't buy any books and went home about three times in the year.

    I am bitter about it, but that doesn't mean the situation isn't wrong.

    My parents didn't pay for my accommodation or give me money. Every single thing I spent came from my 5k, hence my point that that is all one needs.
    Are you from Northern Ireland?

    Oops, just spotted my error regarding earnings. However it still holds that savings aren't taken into account (income from savings or investments is though).
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Come off it. If you're receiving a maintenance loan of 5k then your household income must be around £50,000. That is wealthy. :rolleyes:
    Lol no. My parents have a lot of savings because they spend money EXTREMELY carefully and wisely. I never had much growing up. We've been on one expensive holiday in my lifetime. We're FAR from wealthy, the money we have is from careful saving - which anyone can do if they can be bothered and have self control.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    These threads always come down to people bragging about their fiscal discipline.

    The point is that you have parents who could give you support, even if they did not. The people in receipt of the full amount have a household income which suggests their parents couldn't give support to their child, even if they wanted to. Those people need to be protected as far as possible.
    Exactly right!

    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    Lol no. My parents have a lot of savings because they spend money EXTREMELY carefully and wisely. I never had much growing up. We've been on one expensive holiday in my lifetime. We're FAR from wealthy, the money we have is from careful saving - which anyone can do if they can be bothered and have self control.
    No? No what? They don't have an income of around 50k? They must do, or else you would have got a bigger maintenance loan. You are wealthy from my perspective. How your parents spend money is irrelevant, see Notorious_B.I.G's post above.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Are you from Northern Ireland?
    My guess is no.

    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    England is my home country And it will always have my loyalty
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    These threads always come down to people bragging about their fiscal discipline.

    The point is that you have parents who could give you support, even if they did not. The people in receipt of the full amount have a household income which suggests their parents couldn't give support to their child, even if they wanted to. Those people need to be protected as far as possible.

    Furthermore, 5k wouldn't cover most people's rent never mind their expenditure for the entire year. I assume you either relied on savings or your parents for out-of-term living. If you are telling me you managed to survive over December and the summer on 5k, then you have reason to brag about your fiscal discipline and I salute you.
    The point is that they didn't need to help me because I lived within my means, which anybody can do. What so you're saying those people should just be given money, rather than be expected to work a part time job?:curious:

    Um, it covered my rent! Which was just less than 4k iirc. I'll get my budget out (yes, I made a budget and recorded everything I spent).


    £ 5,368.00 £ 3,792.00 £ 1,576.00
    Left is my loan, middle was my rent (I went for the cheapest accommodation, ofc), right is what I had left. I finished the year, from September 16 to July 17 with £45 left.

    I moved back home for summer and here I have a part time job.

    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Are you from Northern Ireland?
    Oh whoops, no I am not. But that doesn't matter, because I am 99.9% sure that your own income counts in England too.
 
 
 
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