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    I am really torn between the two courses, so much so I'm thinking of doing Natural Sciences (Bio and Chem). I want to eventually go into researching diseases and how they can be stopped or treated, possibly go into the drug development side of things, but I don't know which course is best for this! I've heard that with biomed, most people end up working in the NHS, and with biochem sometimes people are refused roles in disease research.
    Advice really appreciated!!
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    (Original post by Rangzii)
    I am really torn between the two courses, so much so I'm thinking of doing Natural Sciences (Bio and Chem). I want to eventually go into researching diseases and how they can be stopped or treated, possibly go into the drug development side of things, but I don't know which course is best for this! I've heard that with biomed, most people end up working in the NHS, and with biochem sometimes people are refused roles in disease research.
    Advice really appreciated!!
    I am probably biased (I have a Biochemistry degree) but for drug development, I would suggest Biochemistry, which covers a fair amount of biomedical science anyway, and will give you some knowledge of the basic chemistry underlying most drugs.

    However, neither would rule out working later in disease research OR working in the NHS. Clinical scientists in the NHS tend to have very good first degree classifications in a range of biosciences, and receive a lot of training while they work.
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    (Original post by PeteM01)
    I am probably biased (I have a Biochemistry degree) but for drug development, I would suggest Biochemistry, which covers a fair amount of biomedical science anyway, and will give you some knowledge of the basic chemistry underlying most drugs.

    However, neither would rule out working later in disease research OR working in the NHS. Clinical scientists in the NHS tend to have very good first degree classifications in a range of biosciences, and receive a lot of training while they work.
    Thanks for replying!
    I've been confused over this for a while because I've heard so many conflicting things. I prefer the chemistry side of things anyway and most degrees are flexible enought to allow me to study some biomedical units anyway (I think). I'm biased anyway lol
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    If you want to do disease research, definitely do Biomedical - it's just more focussed. Research is big in the biomedical sciences. I know a lot of people want to work for the NHS, but the other half of Biomeds stick with academia.
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    My question is though, why is not possible to do disease research with biochemistry?
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    (Original post by Rangzii)
    My question is though, why is not possible to do disease research with biochemistry?
    It's totally possible. Just check out some phds for requirements
 
 
 
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