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    Hello .. i would like to know how to study computer engineering in uk.. i will take
    my bachelor's degree in computer sciences in july 2019.. Can anyone help me please?
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    (Original post by Mr.Sdiri)
    Hello .. i would like to know how to study computer engineering in uk.. i will take
    my bachelor's degree in computer sciences in july 2019.. Can anyone help me please?
    By computer engineering are you talking about micro-electronics, instruction architectures and processor design? Best thing I could suggest if you are dead set on that career path is absolutely work your arse off in your BSc computer science degree, graduate with a first class honours (essential) and then apply for a graduate training position with ARM or Microsoft Research (both based in Cambridge, UK) or another similar company. That would be how I would do it anyway...

    Competition will be fierce though, so that first class degree is vital, as well as having a strong portfolio of work, e.g. build your own processor and learn around the subject. For example learning VHDL or Verilog will be a massive help should you apply for a graduate job at ARM (along with knowing their main instruction sets and compiler design etc).

    ETA - Knowing some degree level electronics will definitely help also. Things like FPGA's, digital systems and the maths behind digital signal processing, e.g. z-transforms. When it comes to computer engineering its really a blend of digital electronics and computer science, with a bit of physics for transistor design, leakage currents etc. Be prepared to read around the subject and not just follow the syllabus.
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    (Original post by PepticSalve)
    By computer engineering are you talking about micro-electronics, instruction architectures and processor design? Best thing I could suggest if you are dead set on that career path is absolutely work your arse off in your BSc computer science degree, graduate with a first class honours (essential) and then apply for a graduate training position with ARM or Microsoft Research (both based in Cambridge, UK) or another similar company. That would be how I would do it anyway...

    Competition will be fierce though, so that first class degree is vital, as well as having a strong portfolio of work, e.g. build your own processor and learn around the subject. For example learning VHDL or Verilog will be a massive help should you apply for a graduate job at ARM (along with knowing their main instruction sets and compiler design etc).

    ETA - Knowing some degree level electronics will definitely help also. Things like FPGA's, digital systems and the maths behind digital signal processing, e.g. z-transforms. When it comes to computer engineering its really a blend of digital electronics and computer science, with a bit of physics for transistor design, leakage currents etc. Be prepared to read around the subject and not just follow the syllabus.
    thank you very much for this important advices .. i'm talking about software engineering .. our courses is all about JAVA , C languange and C# ect .. I got the second class at the first year .. still 2 years to take license in computer sciences (
    Development of computer systems)..
 
 
 
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