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Ultimate piece of advice you'd give to someone starting A-levels '17 [Golden thread] Watch

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    1) Hit the ground running! Starting well and having a plan (see #10) will put you in good stead.

    2)Be ahead of your lessons (like by a chapter/topic or two) especially for subjects like maths/sciences. May use weekends or private study (if you have any) for this.

    3)Do your homework on time (seriously this is like the bare minimum). Start your homework the DAY you get it.

    4)For every hour spent in class do at least 1 1/2 hours (90 minutes) outside of class. Also make solid notes whilst you're doing the topics - it just makes life easier later and revision will be more condensing the info you've written up into memorable pieces instead of writing out your textbook.

    4) rinse out your teachers! I mean be reasonable of course...but use them whilst you're there. Word of caution: teachers don't like helping lazy students, so do your bit first and then go to them for clarification etc...

    5) may want to get the syllabus for your subject and cross off what you do in class as you go.

    6) Be punctual and organised, A-level studies are tedious enough, you don't want to be stressed out over these things as well. Keep your notes safe and place them somewhere you'll remember.

    7) take coursework seriously (even if it's only a small proportion of your grade)

    8) Ask for help! Speak up! Don't be afraid of looking 'stupid'. Unless you haven't done your bit by studying etc...but even then ask for help...

    9) join/start a club or society, raise money for charity, volunteer and read widely on whatever interests you.(studies come first, but assuming you do #6 you can maximise your time at sixth form/college).

    10) Have a plan. Don't worry if you lapse, get back on track, always revise/rework said plan until results day.

    11) make flash cards, posters, mindmaps when studying/revising. Personally, I don't use many colours just green, blue, red and black biro and and a yellow highlighter but whatever works for you...


    12) have fun in between

    Good luck
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    (Original post by Gyoza)
    Probably goes against the point of this site but I'd say probably consider not going to uni straight away afterwards. If I could do it again I'd get an apprenticeship at 18, work in my trade for five to ten years then go to uni and get a degree in something that will help me in my job. Business if I wanted to set up on my own, or some kind of computer science/electrical engineering to figure out how to automate parts of whichever trade I chose.
    I think this is great advice! There are a lot of different options for after A-level, and doing a degree straight away (or at all) is not for everyone. It seems like there is a bit of a stigma around not going to uni straight away but nowadays I think more and more people are opening themselves up to different options, especially apprenticeships.
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    (Original post by happyflappy)
    1) Hit the ground running! Starting well and having a plan (see #10) will put you in good stead.

    2)Be ahead of your lessons (like by a chapter/topic or two) especially for subjects like maths/sciences. May use weekends or private study (if you have any) for this.

    3)Do your homework on time (seriously this is like the bare minimum). Start your homework the DAY you get it.

    4)For every hour spent in class do at least 1 1/2 hours (90 minutes) outside of class. Also make solid notes whilst you're doing the topics - it just makes life easier later and revision will be more condensing the info you've written up into memorable pieces instead of writing out your textbook.

    4) rinse out your teachers! I mean be reasonable of course...but use them whilst you're there. Word of caution: teachers don't like helping lazy students, so do your bit first and then go to them for clarification etc...

    5) may want to get the syllabus for your subject and cross off what you do in class as you go.

    6) Be punctual and organised, A-level studies are tedious enough, you don't want to be stressed out over these things as well. Keep your notes safe and place them somewhere you'll remember.

    7) take coursework seriously (even if it's only a small proportion of your grade)

    8) Ask for help! Speak up! Don't be afraid of looking 'stupid'. Unless you haven't done your bit by studying etc...but even then ask for help...

    9) join/start a club or society, raise money for charity, volunteer and read widely on whatever interests you.(studies come first, but assuming you do #6 you can maximise your time at sixth form/college).

    10) Have a plan. Don't worry if you lapse, get back on track, always revise/rework said plan until results day.

    11) make flash cards, posters, mindmaps when studying/revising. Personally, I don't use many colours just green, blue, red and black biro and and a yellow highlighter but whatever works for you...


    12) have fun in between

    Good luck
    Amazing advice! :love:
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    Amazing advice! :love:
    Thank you, I wish I knew then what I know now lol
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    Start from day 1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!
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    Start revising now
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    Start revising yesterday, write up notes every single time you do new work even if you don't want to. You'll thank yourself in the future when you have a nice folder full of revision notes (something I never did and basically had a meltdown during exam time 😂)
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    If you're doing an essay subject (English Lit/Lang, History, Geography, Languages etc...)

    Try to type up all of your essays, if you can. If not, type up the essays you've written on paper, and add in the comments. Make one huge document filled with all of your essays, and rank them by mark. Write extra essays for teachers and get them marked too. Take low marked essays, read the comments, reread the essay and tweak the paragraphs to see where you could have improved. Give each essay a date on which you wrote it ,so a year later in year 13 you can look back and marvel at how dumb you were in year 12 (we've all been there, don't think you won't). Keep this Big Essay Thing on your laptop so, when it comes to A Level revision, you can read through all your essays on all the different types of question you might get asked. For example, save all the essays you've written on Henry VIII in one area so you can see how you'd write an essay about his foreign policy, or his domestic policy, or the rise and fall of Wolsey. More times than not, the question you'll get in the exam will be some iteration of a question you've already read or answered, so put that luck to the test and read and reread and plan and replan any potential essays that might come up. If you've already covered most bases, that time saved in the exam where you don't have to come up with a bunch of ideas from scratch, could be the difference between a C and a B, or an A and an A*.

    Anyone looking for advice on English Lit, Lang or History? Feel free to message me, I'm doing heck all at the moment anyway.
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    It does get easier

    Edit: Guess that's not really advice... My advice would be work hard now, get into the rhythm of working hard and you'll find university easier!
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    Think about your UCAS applications now!! I know it seems like a while away, but honestly you'll find that you'll start year 12 and 5 seconds later you'll be trying to write your personal statement. So do anything now that will make you stand out - volunteering, essay competitions, wider reading, clubs, etc, and you'll thank yourself later.

    Make revision notes as you go along/as soon as you've finished a topic.

    I do Biology, Chemistry and Maths and I've enjoyed year 12 much more than I've enjoyed year 11. Yes, A levels are stressful and you'll probably feel completely overwhelmed a few times but it is doable - and it is possible to have a good time too.
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    You are almost certainly stressed or will be at some stage, but it is not the end of the world. Nothing ever is. Just choose a course you enjoy and do your best. Don't let it stress you out too much. You'll be fine.
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    Leave it and do a BTEC. It's less exhausting and you'll still get into University.
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    So I didn't do the A-Levels but I did the IB (which I think is 50 times harder...) but I think the advice stays the same:
    • Plan out your day, week, month and keep deadlines for assignments clear
    • Aim for 8 hours to 8.5 hours of sleep EVERY NIGHT
    • It is better to go to sleep at your regular time and wake up earlier to finish things than to push into your sleeping time
    • review all your lessons the day you learn them, and read ahead to prepare for your next lesson
    • To build up your vocab in a foreign language, try out memrise or duolingo
    • Stay positive, meditate (if you're open to this idea (I use the app Calm)), and stay focused, but most importantly tell yourself you can do it!
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    dont totally cut out all sources of entertainment because that wont help at all

    start revision in advance (from like december) so you have way much free time when exams are close hence u wont feel stressed out as u can take many off days from studying which helps a looooooot!

    try to finish little chunks of works everyday instead of overwhelming yourself with too much stuff at once

    listen carefully to what your teacher is saying in class! (unless they are totally useless like mine)

    i know everyone says this but do pastpapers none stop!!!!!! they help sooooo much
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    Find a revision method that works for you. Don't use flashcards or mind maps because that's what everyone else does - try them out and see if they are helpful and if not ditch them and try something else.
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    I believe the most important thing to remember when doing A Levels is to keep on top of your work.

    If you get homework, do it on the day and tick it off your to do list (this is a good tip - keep a to do list).

    If you don't understand something, go over it before the next class.

    As revision complete practice questions in your free time, this helps me remember more.

    Revise for your AS exams during A2 - you need to know it all for final exams and may not have time to go over it all in class.

    For business, practice essays frequently! Mind maps are good for revision.

    For psychology, brush up on basic gcse maths if you struggled (mode median mean and statistics/graphs). I write out notes and do practice questions.

    For biology, you will need to put in a lot of time for this subject. Make revision cards as you study the subject and include questions - go over with a friend.

    Ask your teachers to use kahoot online - it's an online competitive quiz between classmates.

    Finally, have things to do that destress you however could be a useful extra curricular for example dofe or NCS. Destressing activities could be art or reading, whatever you find helpful.
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    Go to a uni open or a taster day/event through the year or sept. It really motivates you
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    Don't go searching for answers. Do think about how to approach questions that you cannot immediately do for as long as possible. It's thinking about hard questions that will help you understand, not learning other people's answers.
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    START.REVISING.EARLY(PLEASE)
    A LEVELS ARE HARD AF..NOTHING COMPARED TO GCSEs
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    Revise
 
 
 
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