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Ultimate piece of advice you'd give to someone starting A-levels '17 [Golden thread] Watch

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    Work hard but also remember to give yourself time to have fun and enjoy the last year of A-levels.

    Another tip if youre planning to start University after A-levels start saving. Look for hidden costs of your course early!
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    (Original post by bonnie_x)
    Think about your UCAS applications now!! I know it seems like a while away, but honestly you'll find that you'll start year 12 and 5 seconds later you'll be trying to write your personal statement. So do anything now that will make you stand out - volunteering, essay competitions, wider reading, clubs, etc, and you'll thank yourself later.

    Make revision notes as you go along/as soon as you've finished a topic.

    I do Biology, Chemistry and Maths and I've enjoyed year 12 much more than I've enjoyed year 11. Yes, A levels are stressful and you'll probably feel completely overwhelmed a few times but it is doable - and it is possible to have a good time too.
    What extracurricular stuff would you suggest for the topics you're learning?
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    Revise.

    And then revise some more.

    Keep going and don't give up.
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    (Original post by CastCuraga)
    Read up about Foundation Years. A Levels are pretty much designed to see what subjects you can love even when it gets hard and frustrating, but you may end up finding you hate all of them.

    In the same way, not having to study some things anymore will actually make you miss them - or grow an appreciation of them later in life. The sooner you learn about these, the better you can feel knowing no subject is truly "out of your reach", so to speak. Nearly every subject has one now, from English to even Medicine.

    So don't feel like you're doomed if you "picked the wrong subjects" - you can still study it at some incredible universities, including most of the Russell Group, by making a case for a Foundation Year.

    I can personally attest to it, having gone from getting a C in Maths at GCSE to now studying Medical Engineering at a Russell Group uni.
    Wow a C in maths to engineering! that's fantastic!
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    (Original post by hughieelgar)
    First of all the jump in some subjects is easier than others. I took on 4 A-levels: Chemistry, Maths, Psychology and Economics. The hardest were by far chemistry and maths. I took chemistry because I thought I was good at it (getting an A at GCSE, and A*A*A* in triple science) but in no way was I prepared for the workload or the difficulty. I strongly suggest that anyone who takes chemistry only takes it because they NEED it for their uni choice, if you're that far ahead in planning. Chemistry was a myth... luckily however I had 3 others to fall back on. Don't be put off from taking on 4 A-levels and dropping in the first month whilst you still can!Secondly, whilst you're in sixth form everyone reaches key milestones like learning to drive, turning 18 (and your first legal drink), getting a part time job (this can be especially tiring and many people give up near exam time) etc. Don't let these things distract you from your studies! I certainly did and it probably is not gonna be a joyous results day to say the least. Hate to sound cliché but work-life balance is imperative!
    How did you find physics?
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    start thinking about your uni or apprenticeship or internship choices before the start of year 12, and get what you need to get done as soon as possible - don't leave anything to the last minute, cause then you have more time to focus on the classes and more time to study. also, don't leave revision to a few weeks or months before your exams and cram it into such a small time period, you have to start revising way before that little by little - keep a timetable to help you work out when you will study and revise. its better to revise a little each week over the course of two years than cramming it into a week or month before your exam. but, at the same time, make sure you get your sleep and stay hydrated and always eat, cause quite a few people i knew didn't because they were so focused on getting work done, especially if they had left revision to the last minute. you have to focus on your health, first and foremost. and, remember: if you don't get the results you need, don't worry. a lot of people out there haven't and still became successful. sometimes, schools will put a lot of pressure on you to get the grades, suggesting that it's the end of the world, but it isn't. just try your best, and try to get the best grades possible, because it can get overwhelming. you just have to put the effort in.
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    Chose the right a-levels for what you want to do. The reason facilitating subjects are facilitating isn't necessarily because they are hard but because they open lots of doors. Assuming you are good at all these subjects, maths+a science+ an essay subject will keep pretty much every degree you could want to do open to you.
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    Don’t miss the point of free periods. Don’t sit and chat through them, and don’t use them to make sure you have no work for when you get home. They’re super valuable and you have so much revision to do, so make sure you use them right from the start of Year 12 to revise, because you’ll definitely work when you get home too if there’s unfinished homework.
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    Use your free time to do homework or revision
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    Start going to uni open days and if you don't do any extra curricular activities, start now it would help with personal statements
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    Literally the most accurate thing I have ever seen XD
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    It does depends on the subject but I agree with splitting your time equally between all subjects, otherwise come exam/mock time and you have to drop all the other subjects to focus on the one you "forgot" about. If you don't understand it, go and ask for a clarification. One thing builds up on top of another and then you stare sadly at a practice paper and don't even know what they want you to do. Youtube videos will save your life when it comes to certain topics in sciences and maths and prepare hard for your mocks since all your grades will be used to make university predictions. Since you don't do AS exams anymore, don't stress so much about year 12 but still keep on top of things otherwise you'll have twice as much to revise in Year 13. A WHITEBOARD. I used it for French, Maths and Chemistry (although it sucked for biology) and I've got a big one at home and a mini one in my backpack. Really good for practising little bits, conjugations, formulas and diagrams. September and October will be a transition period so don't worry about getting poor grades but after December the teachers will expect high quality work.
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    (Original post by aieshacaitlin)
    Be prepared to hate most of it.
    Be prepared for sleepless nights.
    Be prepared to have no social life.
    Already hate all of it.
    Already have no sleep at this time of year (September-for those reading in the future).
    I have a very small social life.
 
 
 
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