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    Hi

    I'm going to be applying to do Computer Science with Maths (or maybe just Computer Science, I can't decide) and as far as I can tell, at Durham this combination only seems to be possible through Natural Sciences?

    I want to do an integrated masters and I'm struggling to find out whether it will be possible to do just CS and Maths modules in an MSci in Natural Sciences at Durham - I've looked at the website but I can't really find what I'm looking for.
    Does anyone have any more information on this, from experience or otherwise?

    (Also if anyone can recommend any Computer Science and Maths courses or very mathematical CS courses at other universities, that would be great. I'm definitely planning on applying to Cambridge and Warwick, and maybe also Leeds,)

    Thanks!
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    Anyone?
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    Yes, you can do this two subject combination. I think they even have a specific pathway for it, although I could be wrong on this. They certainly have a number of modules on both sides that naturally fit together and support an overall programme in the two. There is no requirement to study more than two subjects to my knowledge, although depending on your interests you may want to consider including physics or philosophy options which would both fit into different themes in this area.

    Outside of this, UCL has it's Mathematical Computation course, which is ostensibly a joint honours between Maths and CS there. Warwick you've mentioned already, although it's worth noting they specifically have a course in Discrete Mathematics which is focused on this particular area. I believe Bristol has a joint honours in Maths and CS or something similarly titled which covers both areas. Southampton has Mathematics with Computer Science - the latter being a "minor" pathway, although there are a number of CS related modules in the maths department anyway (e.g. number theory in first/third year, algorithms in second year, various MORSE type options related to optimization methods, many mathematical modelling oriented courses relating to the applied maths side), Southampton also have their NatSci course which is considerably open ended - you pretty much get carte blanche over their module catalog after the core NatSci modules each year.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Yes, you can do this two subject combination. I think they even have a specific pathway for it, although I could be wrong on this. They certainly have a number of modules on both sides that naturally fit together and support an overall programme in the two. There is no requirement to study more than two subjects to my knowledge, although depending on your interests you may want to consider including physics or philosophy options which would both fit into different themes in this area.

    Outside of this, UCL has it's Mathematical Computation course, which is ostensibly a joint honours between Maths and CS there. Warwick you've mentioned already, although it's worth noting they specifically have a course in Discrete Mathematics which is focused on this particular area. I believe Bristol has a joint honours in Maths and CS or something similarly titled which covers both areas. Southampton has Mathematics with Computer Science - the latter being a "minor" pathway, although there are a number of CS related modules in the maths department anyway (e.g. number theory in first/third year, algorithms in second year, various MORSE type options related to optimization methods, many mathematical modelling oriented courses relating to the applied maths side), Southampton also have their NatSci course which is considerably open ended - you pretty much get carte blanche over their module catalog after the core NatSci modules each year.
    Thanks for your reply! Philosophy sounds like a good option if I wanted to do a different module and I'm glad I have the option to do just two subjects; I was worried I'd end up having to economics units or something as I don't have A Level Physics/Chemistry/Biology (I'm doing Further Maths, Computer Science and Spanish) but I do like Philosophy.

    I had ruled out UCL because I don't really want to got to university in London, but I'll have a look at the course. Discrete Maths is the course at Warwick I was planning to apply for. I hadn't considered Bristol yet so I'll look into it. I was considering Southampton my the Maths with CS course didn't seem to contain enough CS for me, and unfortunately I don't think I can apply to NatSci there due to my A Level subjects.
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    (Original post by Lelanor)
    Thanks for your reply! Philosophy sounds like a good option if I wanted to do a different module and I'm glad I have the option to do just two subjects; I was worried I'd end up having to economics units or something as I don't have A Level Physics/Chemistry/Biology (I'm doing Further Maths, Computer Science and Spanish) but I do like Philosophy.

    I had ruled out UCL because I don't really want to got to university in London, but I'll have a look at the course. Discrete Maths is the course at Warwick I was planning to apply for. I hadn't considered Bristol yet so I'll look into it. I was considering Southampton my the Maths with CS course didn't seem to contain enough CS for me, and unfortunately I don't think I can apply to NatSci there due to my A Level subjects.
    I wasn't expecting to find someone in almost the exact same situation as me! I'm planning on taking a 4 year Masters in Maths and CS, maybe straight CS but I'm leaning towards M+CS for the flexibility and the fact I like maths. I came here looking for answers to your question because I wanted to see how much of my own 50/50 split I could craft in Durham, seeing as though it's ranked so highly. Here's what I have found through many hours of research:

    Oxford, Warwick, Bath, Birmingham, Leeds, Bristol, Loughborough and Exeter offer various flavours of joint honours 50/50 Maths and Computer Science (or as you say in Warwick's case, DisMath). These are pretty much the top universities that have those specific subjects as a joint Hons degree. Edinburgh and St Andrews do too, but they're a 4 year Bachelor instead, which isn't worth it imho. I've looked pretty in-depth at the modules at Warwick, Brum and Oxford, and in the M+CS courses, there is a lot of theoretical, heavy maths and the more maths-y side of CS in the core, and optionals usually allow you to pick from both Maths and CS optional lists. On the straight CS side of things, there are a lot more actual CS-y subjects like Networking and Operating Systems and Databases, along with the theory like Logic and some Discrete Maths and Algorithms, AI and Machine Learning etc. It seems to me that apart from Oxford's, the M+CS courses have a bit too much of the maths I don't really find interesting for my taste, and the CS courses don't have quite enough of the kind of maths I enjoy - it's really quite frustrating.

    One thing that strikes me as a bit odd - I'm not certain if unis will accept your Further Maths as a substitute for regular Maths, you should probably email/call and check.

    Best of luck!
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    (Original post by plklupu)
    I wasn't expecting to find someone in almost the exact same situation as me! I'm planning on taking a 4 year Masters in Maths and CS, maybe straight CS but I'm leaning towards M+CS for the flexibility and the fact I like maths. I came here looking for answers to your question because I wanted to see how much of my own 50/50 split I could craft in Durham, seeing as though it's ranked so highly. Here's what I have found through many hours of research:

    Oxford, Warwick, Bath, Birmingham, Leeds, Bristol, Loughborough and Exeter offer various flavours of joint honours 50/50 Maths and Computer Science (or as you say in Warwick's case, DisMath). These are pretty much the top universities that have those specific subjects as a joint Hons degree. Edinburgh and St Andrews do too, but they're a 4 year Bachelor instead, which isn't worth it imho. I've looked pretty in-depth at the modules at Warwick, Brum and Oxford, and in the M+CS courses, there is a lot of theoretical, heavy maths and the more maths-y side of CS in the core, and optionals usually allow you to pick from both Maths and CS optional lists. On the straight CS side of things, there are a lot more actual CS-y subjects like Networking and Operating Systems and Databases, along with the theory like Logic and some Discrete Maths and Algorithms, AI and Machine Learning etc. It seems to me that apart from Oxford's, the M+CS courses have a bit too much of the maths I don't really find interesting for my taste, and the CS courses don't have quite enough of the kind of maths I enjoy - it's really quite frustrating.

    One thing that strikes me as a bit odd - I'm not certain if unis will accept your Further Maths as a substitute for regular Maths, you should probably email/call and check.

    Best of luck!
    Thanks!

    I am doing Maths as well (pretty sure you have to to do Further Maths so I often don't bother listing maths and further maths to save time), got the grade for that today!

    I'm also having the same problem with CS courses not having enough maths and Maths+CS having too much maths I don't want.

    I've researched some of the same universities as you, plus some others and I've been shortening the list. My current list of possibilities and reasons fro/against is:

    Cambridge: CS (with Maths in first year if I do well in STEP). Pretty definite on applying, especially now I have my Maths grade. Also I prefer Cambridge to Oxford and now know much more about the university, the colleges and the course. Apply for BSc and can continue to MEng if you get a first.

    Warwick: Discrete Maths (small possibility of Data Science but I'm not sure if I really like statistics enough). Again I'm pretty definite. I visited and liked it, the course is mostly what I'm looking for, liked the campus and accommodation. Can transfer between BSc and MEng. The deprtment members who talked at the open day seemed nice.

    Leeds: CS with Maths. Probably as it has slightly lower entry requirements. You can specialise in discrete maths, range of accommodaion, study aboard/work placement possible. Has a language centre for self-studying languages (something I'm interested in)

    Durham: Naural Sciences to do CS and Maths. Definitely possible that I'll apply. I think it allows you to do some modules from other subjects (such as langauges). I should probably look more into the actual modules available, I'm wondering if it's more reputation rather than the course making me want to apply.

    Birmingham: CS with Maths. Also possible that I'll apply here. You can get a lower A Level offer with a 2 in a STEP paper (which I'll be doing for Cambridge anyway). You can do a project in maths or computer science. There are modules in applied maths or discrete maths. Can switch between MSci and BSc.

    Bristol: CS with Maths. Quite likely to apply here. Accredited course which doesn't seem that common for joint CS+Maths? High entry requirements but lower if you do Further Maths. My note on it say "looks good" but I can't remember why -- I'm guessing it filled my CS to Maths balance needs. Also like the look of the accommodation.

    UCL: Mathematical Computation. Slightly possible, not as likely as others that I'll apply here. I don't remember much about the course except I liked the look of it. However I'm really not too keen on going to university in London.

    Exeter: CS and Maths. Again, slightly possible I'll apply here. Maybe more likely that UCL. Lots of options possible (including some from other subjects... such as languages). Range of accommodation.

    I'd say currently the 5 I apply to will mostly be Cambridge, Warwick, Bristol, Durham, and Leeds - I think that's what's currently on my UCAS form but it could change several times. It would be useful if I knew more people who did/do CS at uni but it hasn't been a popular subject for people at my school until these year and we only have one CS teacher, and I don't think he did an undergrad degree in it so there's no one to ask at school about it.
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    (Original post by Lelanor)
    Thanks!

    I am doing Maths as well (pretty sure you have to to do Further Maths so I often don't bother listing maths and further maths to save time), got the grade for that today!

    I'm also having the same problem with CS courses not having enough maths and Maths+CS having too much maths I don't want.

    I've researched some of the same universities as you, plus some others and I've been shortening the list. My current list of possibilities and reasons fro/against is:

    Cambridge: CS (with Maths in first year if I do well in STEP). Pretty definite on applying, especially now I have my Maths grade. Also I prefer Cambridge to Oxford and now know much more about the university, the colleges and the course. Apply for BSc and can continue to MEng if you get a first.

    Warwick: Discrete Maths (small possibility of Data Science but I'm not sure if I really like statistics enough). Again I'm pretty definite. I visited and liked it, the course is mostly what I'm looking for, liked the campus and accommodation. Can transfer between BSc and MEng. The deprtment members who talked at the open day seemed nice.

    Leeds: CS with Maths. Probably as it has slightly lower entry requirements. You can specialise in discrete maths, range of accommodaion, study aboard/work placement possible. Has a language centre for self-studying languages (something I'm interested in)

    Durham: Naural Sciences to do CS and Maths. Definitely possible that I'll apply. I think it allows you to do some modules from other subjects (such as langauges). I should probably look more into the actual modules available, I'm wondering if it's more reputation rather than the course making me want to apply.

    Birmingham: CS with Maths. Also possible that I'll apply here. You can get a lower A Level offer with a 2 in a STEP paper (which I'll be doing for Cambridge anyway). You can do a project in maths or computer science. There are modules in applied maths or discrete maths. Can switch between MSci and BSc.

    Bristol: CS with Maths. Quite likely to apply here. Accredited course which doesn't seem that common for joint CS+Maths? High entry requirements but lower if you do Further Maths. My note on it say "looks good" but I can't remember why -- I'm guessing it filled my CS to Maths balance needs. Also like the look of the accommodation.

    UCL: Mathematical Computation. Slightly possible, not as likely as others that I'll apply here. I don't remember much about the course except I liked the look of it. However I'm really not too keen on going to university in London.

    Exeter: CS and Maths. Again, slightly possible I'll apply here. Maybe more likely that UCL. Lots of options possible (including some from other subjects... such as languages). Range of accommodation.

    I'd say currently the 5 I apply to will mostly be Cambridge, Warwick, Bristol, Durham, and Leeds - I think that's what's currently on my UCAS form but it could change several times. It would be useful if I knew more people who did/do CS at uni but it hasn't been a popular subject for people at my school until these year and we only have one CS teacher, and I don't think he did an undergrad degree in it so there's no one to ask at school about it.
    Nice nice nice - I'm thinking of Oxford mainly b/c I'm **** scared of the STEP :eek: and the MAT looks much nicer. Excluding London and Scotland and going off the highest ranked for overall, Maths and CS in the Guardian and Complete guides I managed to narrow down to Oxford, two of Warwick, Brum & Durham if the admissions people I emailed tonight reply with what I want from the NatSci course lmao, and two of Bath, Bristol, Leeds and Loughborough, leaning towards Bath and Bristol but I really enjoyed the Lough open day, so idk, still need to look at modules and living costs a bit more in-depth. The great thing about Bath and Bristol is that their offers are slightly lower for me owing to some circumstances like being first in my immediate family to go to uni and from a relatively **** school! Not sure if that applies to the other two in that group :P

    I think it's a huge shame that comparatively few unis do this combo, but I'm sure it'll get more popular in the next few years. I would also like more modularity in the options but hey ho! I know that if I went for straight Maths or CS I'd regret it b/c I wouldn't have any or much of the other, so I'm fairly confident that this is the right choice even if some of the modules will end up being not quite as good.

    PS What AS results did you get? I got 265 UMS for Maths, 272 for Further, mid B for CompSci but it was self-taught because of similar staff shortages (cri everi day) and 1 raw mark off an A in Physics
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    (Original post by plklupu)
    Nice nice nice - I'm thinking of Oxford mainly b/c I'm **** scared of the STEP :eek: and the MAT looks much nicer. Excluding London and Scotland and going off the highest ranked for overall, Maths and CS in the Guardian and Complete guides I managed to narrow down to Oxford, two of Warwick, Brum & Durham if the admissions people I emailed tonight reply with what I want from the NatSci course lmao, and two of Bath, Bristol, Leeds and Loughborough, leaning towards Bath and Bristol but I really enjoyed the Lough open day, so idk, still need to look at modules and living costs a bit more in-depth. The great thing about Bath and Bristol is that their offers are slightly lower for me owing to some circumstances like being first in my immediate family to go to uni and from a relatively **** school! Not sure if that applies to the other two in that group :P

    I think it's a huge shame that comparatively few unis do this combo, but I'm sure it'll get more popular in the next few years. I would also like more modularity in the options but hey ho! I know that if I went for straight Maths or CS I'd regret it b/c I wouldn't have any or much of the other, so I'm fairly confident that this is the right choice even if some of the modules will end up being not quite as good.

    PS What AS results did you get? I got 265 UMS for Maths, 272 for Further, mid B for CompSci but it was self-taught because of similar staff shortages (cri everi day) and 1 raw mark off an A in Physics
    Yeah same, I also realised I'd regret doing straight CS (or Maths)

    STEP does look really scary but as I've done C3 and C4 I've covered enough to be able to start preparing so I'm starting to try it out. And even if I get an offer and then mess up STEP, I'll most likely still be able to do just CS at Cambridge if I meet the rest of the offer.

    I didn't do AS but I did do full A Level Maths and got 568 UMS (my best modules were C3 and C4?? what). In internal exams I got a (high? I can't remember exactly) A in CS, and a B in Spanish (owing mostly to my awful speaking exam aaahh but at least I got a B so my school will let me continue 4 A Levels)

    It sucks that you have to self-teach - I'm lucky that I have 7 lessons a fortnight timetabled with the one permanent CS teacher and although a short string of temporary teachers took the other two lessons, the most recent and longest-staying teacher did seem to know stuff (and occassionally taught a lesson, when he could be bothered). So it wasn't awful but could have been better. But most unis will consider contextual info like staff shortages and low average grades at your school.

    We've started Further, nearly finished FP1 and I taught myself D1 at the start of the summer holidays so I can learn D2 as an extra module while my class does D1 (although I'm starting D2 now as I expect it will take longer than D1).

    I might look into Loughborough and Bath, I know a couple of my friends interested in CS liked Loughborough.
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    (Original post by Lelanor)
    Yeah same, I also realised I'd regret doing straight CS (or Maths)

    STEP does look really scary but as I've done C3 and C4 I've covered enough to be able to start preparing so I'm starting to try it out. And even if I get an offer and then mess up STEP, I'll most likely still be able to do just CS at Cambridge if I meet the rest of the offer.

    I didn't do AS but I did do full A Level Maths and got 568 UMS (my best modules were C3 and C4?? what). In internal exams I got a (high? I can't remember exactly) A in CS, and a B in Spanish (owing mostly to my awful speaking exam aaahh but at least I got a B so my school will let me continue 4 A Levels)

    It sucks that you have to self-teach - I'm lucky that I have 7 lessons a fortnight timetabled with the one permanent CS teacher and although a short string of temporary teachers took the other two lessons, the most recent and longest-staying teacher did seem to know stuff (and occassionally taught a lesson, when he could be bothered). So it wasn't awful but could have been better. But most unis will consider contextual info like staff shortages and low average grades at your school.

    We've started Further, nearly finished FP1 and I taught myself D1 at the start of the summer holidays so I can learn D2 as an extra module while my class does D1 (although I'm starting D2 now as I expect it will take longer than D1).

    I might look into Loughborough and Bath, I know a couple of my friends interested in CS liked Loughborough.
    Ah, we do C3 and C4 in Year 13, so that's the main reason for not being able to properly do it :P Well done on that 568! 94.7 is a ****ing amazing average. I'm doing History new spec too, so I'm dropping Physics and couldn't continue with CS anyway b/c no-one would moderate coursework for one person even if they could Ain't no brakes on the (hopefully at least) A*AA train! And you bet I'm telling them in my Personal Statement that I did it all myself on the back of GCSE CompSci, a revision guide and like 3 hours with my old CS teacher! Bless his soul.

    FP1 was my joint best module (with D2 at 92 ums), I hated it at first but ended up loving it about 2/3 of the way through the year! And trust me, if you've got a good handle on D1, D2 is piss easy - I decided quite early in the year to do D2 as an extra module (for those extra self-taught brownie points ya feel!), and in 5 days of learning D2 from a textbook, Physics & Maths Tutor revision guides and youtube videos I got 63 ums, could've gotten even higher if I revised slightly more and/or started earlier. It's really fun as well, I loved the game theory and allocation bits, and formulating stuff as linear programming problems - stuff we get to do more of in M+CS!

    On my Excel spreadsheet comparing the aforementioned averages of overall, CS and M rankings from Complete and Guardian, Bath comes fourth after Oxford, St A's and Warwick, with an average ranking across everything of 9.67. It's supposedly really good! Loughborough's facilities are quite nice, the staff seemed pleasant and the students seemed happy (not like they'd pick the miserable ones as open day ambassadors anyway lmao) but the only thing that puts me off slightly is the course content for M+CS, I think it's more fun/in depth at some of the other AAA unis.
 
 
 
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