Any chance of a training contract with a good firm? Watch

M-P-JxX
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Lord_Jeggings
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From my personal viewpoint A-Levels are a small part of the story. Crudely speaking law firms will most likely have a problem with your 64 at Politics than anything else at least from an academic standpoint. A friend of mine at Latham & Watkins achieved some A-Levels along the lines of ABB or worse. However, 64 on a Politics degree will probably not meet the standards. Had it been a law degree it would, however Politics and other non-legal degrees (such as History, Geography) are perceived as degrees were a first is required or at least 68+.

On the other hand there is a bright side. There are people with minimum 2.1s such as 60 or even 2.2s (extremely rare) that are offered TCs with very good firms. For example I know of an instance were a 2.2. law graduate got an offer from Clifford Chance. However, one must prove either very impeding extenuating circumstances or other achievements and interests that complement the gap. For example, winning some kind of competition, or having a strong variety of positions of responsibility, or maybe solid legal work experience. There is more than academics, however realistically speaking you must exhibit a unique character otherwise. You must remember the great minority will achieve a 1st overall degree, thus there is ample room however firms do need to see something interesting in you that will captivate their interest.

Do not be discouraged, the times are difficult and I am in the same boat as you are. Although numerous times the process has been dubious (and let's be honest meritocracy does not exist), you must go the extra mile to convince them of your capabilities and commitment to law. My advice is build as many experiences as possible, including work, extra-curricular, and in any other way! Best of luck For the record I definitely believe you have a chance as long as you commit to it!
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M-P-JxX
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(Original post by Lord_Jeggings)
From my personal viewpoint A-Levels are a small part of the story. Crudely speaking law firms will most likely have a problem with your 64 at Politics than anything else at least from an academic standpoint. A friend of mine at Latham & Watkins achieved some A-Levels along the lines of ABB or worse. However, 64 on a Politics degree will probably not meet the standards. Had it been a law degree it would, however Politics and other non-legal degrees (such as History, Geography) are perceived as degrees were a first is required or at least 68+.

On the other hand there is a bright side. There are people with minimum 2.1s such as 60 or even 2.2s (extremely rare) that are offered TCs with very good firms. For example I know of an instance were a 2.2. law graduate got an offer from Clifford Chance. However, one must prove either very impeding extenuating circumstances or other achievements and interests that complement the gap. For example, winning some kind of competition, or having a strong variety of positions of responsibility, or maybe solid legal work experience. There is more than academics, however realistically speaking you must exhibit a unique character otherwise. You must remember the great minority will achieve a 1st overall degree, thus there is ample room however firms do need to see something interesting in you that will captivate their interest.

Do not be discouraged, the times are difficult and I am in the same boat as you are. Although numerous times the process has been dubious (and let's be honest meritocracy does not exist), you must go the extra mile to convince them of your capabilities and commitment to law. My advice is build as many experiences as possible, including work, extra-curricular, and in any other way! Best of luck For the record I definitely believe you have a chance as long as you commit to it!
Thank you for your reply!!

Well thats the thing, the graduate law course I did at Leeds university was a law degree- its not a conversion course- so I have got a 65 LLB Law from Leeds (did everything a normal 18 year old would do, but my course was arguably harder as we did not do some of the modules they did such as law and society and researching law, and I had to do 4 core modules in final year whereas they do 1)- surely they will look at that more than the politics degree?

This is the degree
http://www.law.leeds.ac.uk/undergrad...ate-programme/
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M-P-JxX
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(Original post by J-SP)
What do you class as a good firm?
Sorry that was a bit ambiguous- So I would say there are 4 classes of top firms;

You have magic circle: think this is almost out of the question- even if I got 3As, would still be extremely difficult they are after the top grade pretty much everywhere.

Then you have silver circle: I would include some firms in this category that are not technically silver circle like eversheds.

Then you have the third class; firms like Nabarro, Bird and Bird, Simmons and Simmons and Mishcon de Reya etc

Then you would have regional firms like Walker Morris etc

So I would say any of these 4 (even though I know magic circle is unrealistic).

Sorry if my categorizing of law firms is wrong!
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jacketpotato
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You will not get a Training Contract at a "top" firm with your A-levels. Most of the top firms (including pretty much all of the Magic Circle) have a strict AAB cut-off.

However there are plenty of other excellent firms out there. The A-levels will be a disadvantage but they shouldn't disqualify you.
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by J-SP)
The MC point is just not true.

Linklaters, Clifford Chance and Allen & Overy used contextualised recruitment processes which "flex" that supposed strict AAB cut off

Freshfields and Slaughters do not have an AAB requirement.
I think we have to be a bit realistic here. The AAB is a minimum. Most people getting into those firms are going to have AAA or above. If someone doesn't have AAB they are not going to be getting into the Magic Circle unless there are incredibly exceptional circumstances.

I just checked their websites. Three of the Magic Circle firms seem to require AAB (or ask for the same thing through UCAS points) with no flex. S&M and Freshfields admittedly don't seem to publish a grade cut-off but I doubt their standards are any lower.

Clifford Chance's website says "In order to apply for our opportunities you should have a strong academic record. To us that means having 340 UCAS points at A Level (or equivalent) and obtaining or being on target for a 2:1 (or equivalent) degree result or higher."
A&O's website says "We look for a minimum of 340 UCAS points (AAB) at A-level (or equivalent) and a 2:1 (or equivalent)."
Linklaters' website says you need AAB to apply.

Of course most people don't go to Magic Circle firms. There are lots of types of legal work which the MC firms aren't great at or simply don't do. Similarly there are plenty of people that don't fancy working 24/7 and at weekends, as people often need to do in that type of firm. There are plenty of other excellent firms out there.
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jacketpotato
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Links' graduate recruitment website says "To be considered for any of our schemes, you’ll need a minimum of AAB at A Level (or equivalent) and a 2:1 degree in any discipline" (http://www.linklatersgraduates.co.uk...cation-process).

Are you suggesting that there is flexibility on this, despite what the website says? I don't have any personal knowledge of that so it would be interesting to know.

I agree that none of these A-level requirements are going to apply when it comes to recruiting qualified lawyers later in their careers. I doubt A-levels play much role at that stage.
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