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Do tests ruin the Education system? Watch

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    Finland tells USA to remove standardised tests:
    https://youtu.be/XQ_agxK6fLs?t=187

    What is the purpose of assessment?

    Does it fit with the requirements that our current young people will need in the future?

    What would the alternative be?

    Post your thoughts here.
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    Nope. How else would you assess a child's academic ability?
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    Not watching 1 hours and 23 minutes to have some BS point made. If you don't have tests, no one learns anything. You can't just **** on tests and say they're terrible, besides less testing there's no other option.
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    (Original post by TheFarmerLad)
    Nope. How else would you assess a child's academic ability?
    Why do you need to assess it at all?
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    (Original post by Coolerthanapples)
    Not watching 1 hours and 23 minutes to have some BS point made. If you don't have tests, no one learns anything. You can't just **** on tests and say they're terrible, besides less testing there's no other option.
    Check out the other video then (edited). In Finland, they do not revolve around testing.
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    Only teaching children how to test well is obviously disastrous, but tests on skills like spelling, phonics and basic mathematics can help track a child's progress and uncover learning difficulties like dyslexia. There are also some subjects, thinking mainly within higher levels of education, where a sound knowledge of the subject matter is vital. Think of Biology, testing seems to be a pretty fair way to determine whether a student had learnt the information they need to know to get a GCSE, an A Level or a degree etc... This has further real life implications, I would not like to be treated by a doctor who failed their Biology A Level because it's a sound way of determining whether they have actually learnt the material vital for their profession.

    In terms of self worth, students need to be reminded that test scores are not meant to rank them as 'less than' other pupils, but to help uncover the best way to help them learn as an individual.

    Furthermore I don't believe that all subjects require testing, especially at Primary and Secondary levels of education. Subjects like history, art, RE and creative writing can be assessed in a less formal manner, though I think testing in any subject is fair should a student go on to pursue that subject at a higher level. For compulsory lessons (like history to young students) an interest and general understanding of historical events can be shown through class participation and independent classwork. They really don't need to be tested and scored on names and dates unless they decide to follow on with history after year nine.
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    (Original post by Wanderlust96)
    Only teaching children how to test well is obviously disastrous, but tests on skills like spelling, phonics and basic mathematics can help track a child's progress and uncover learning difficulties like dyslexia. There are also some subjects, thinking mainly within higher levels of education, where a sound knowledge of the subject matter is vital. Think of Biology, testing seems to be a pretty fair way to determine whether a student had learnt the information they need to know to get a GCSE, an A Level or a degree etc... This has further real life implications, I would not like to be treated by a doctor who failed their Biology A Level because it's a sound way of determining whether they have actually learnt the material vital for their profession.

    In terms of self worth, students need to be reminded that test scores are not meant to rank them as 'less than' other pupils, but to help uncover the best way to help them learn as an individual.

    Furthermore I don't believe that all subjects require testing, especially at Primary and Secondary levels of education. Subjects like history, art, RE and creative writing can be assessed in a less formal manner, though I think testing in any subject is fair should a student go on to pursue that subject at a higher level. For compulsory lessons (like history to young students) an interest and general understanding of historical events can be shown through class participation and independent classwork. They really don't need to be tested and scored on names and dates unless they decide to follow on with history after year nine.
    But since the content of these qualifications are always open to change, is that material really always vital?

    I could argue that tests are indeed a method of ranking from the government, in order to make a more productive and efficient society which benefits the economy. The best way to help them learn, doesn't achieve anything in the real world does it?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    But since the content of these qualifications are always open to change, is that material really always vital?
    But the professions they prepare students for are also subject to change. Generally the curriculum is kept relevant. For instance testing a medical student on the four humours prepared them for their career as a doctor in ancient Greece. Now, this is disregarded and not at all vital. Progress in the wider world results in changing what students are tested on.

    (Original post by 04MR17)
    I could argue that tests are indeed a method of ranking from the government, in order to make a more productive and efficient society which benefits the economy. The best way to help them learn, doesn't achieve anything in the real world does it?
    If the best way to help them learn is by adapting a teaching style that helps students with Dyslexia become literate, I would argue that it is relevant in the real world. This is why I specifically mentioned phonics, spelling and maths. These skills are vital for all fully functioning adults in the modern world.
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    Depends - if the test tests subject knowledge, than no. If it's a science paper and it's all data analysis with barely any science knowledge being tested then yes.
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    (Original post by Wanderlust96)
    But the professions they prepare students for are also subject to change. Generally the curriculum is kept relevant. For instance testing a medical student on the four humours prepared them for their career as a doctor in ancient Greece. Now, this is disregarded and not at all vital. Progress in the wider world results in changing what students are tested on.



    If the best way to help them learn is by adapting a teaching style that helps students with Dyslexia become literate, I would argue that it is relevant in the real world. This is why I specifically mentioned phonics, spelling and maths. These skills are vital for all fully functioning adults in the modern world.
    Fair point.


    But you were talking more generically at that point. And my return about ranking, I believe, still stands.
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    I hate exams but I don't know a more efficient way of measuring a student's ability. The exams do kill my enthusiasm for the subject matter but
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    too much focus on academics. not enough focus on soft and hard skills.
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    (Original post by danielwinstanley)
    Depends - if the test tests subject knowledge, than no. If it's a science paper and it's all data analysis with barely any science knowledge being tested then yes.
    So you think skills are more important. That's fair enough.

    Why must they be tested through an exam though?

    (Original post by saharan_skies)
    I hate exams but I don't know a more efficient way of measuring a student's ability. The exams do kill my enthusiasm for the subject matter but
    Why do you need to measure a student's ability? Can ability be measure accurately?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)

    Why do you need to measure a student's ability? Can ability be measure accurately?
    I think the argument has been implemented above. Our government is capitalist and are searching for workers to benefit its economy which although I don't think is right, is the case. It's the most efficient way to do so. (People who fail their GCSEs and/or go through college/B-tech are expected to go into more physical labour fields for example. It's not always the case but that is the stereotype) Ability is subjective like most things in life are.
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    If the test tests actual knowledge and not your waffling skills (e.g. Data analysis x100000), you can check someone's understanding of a certain topic.

    It can never test someone's ability fully - but how else could you do it?
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    (Original post by saharan_skies)
    I think the argument has been implemented above. Our government is capitalist and are searching for workers to benefit its economy which although I don't think is right, is the case. It's the most efficient way to do so. (People who fail their GCSEs and/or go through college/B-tech are expected to go into more physical labour fields for example. It's not always the case but that is the stereotype) Ability is subjective like most things in life are.
    So you agree with the view that testing has no merit or purpose? Since ability is subjective and you disagree with its current purpose/use.?
    (Original post by danielwinstanley)
    If the test tests actual knowledge and not your waffling skills (e.g. Data analysis x100000), you can check someone's understanding of a certain topic.
    And what is the point in that?
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    i hate the whole idea of tests, because now it's all about who gets the best grades and not about gaining knowledge....but then how else are we gonna know if a child is learning or not?
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    It's not the assessment of students throughout education that is the problem. It is the intensity and frequency of assessments that is the issue. Yes students need to be assessed, and for good reason. Yet, the UK as a prime example, trying to keep up with nations such as Korea & China by turning the education system into an exam factory system. This causes more harm than good in many cases. Not to mention the reforms to education made by the Conservative government since they came back to power in 2010 which have increased the pressure on students.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    And what is the point in that?
    To check whether a student is being taught and is learning - e.g. If a doctor couldn't do an exam, would you feel confident in their abilities? No.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Fair point.


    But you were talking more generically at that point. And my return about ranking, I believe, still stands.
    I think the issue here is that I disagree with that point at it's core. Am I right to assume that by ranking you mean high scorers being more valuable in the eyes of the government? (just want to clear this up before I continue with my perspective on this)
 
 
 
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