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Bartenders with degrees Watch

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    So many bartenders I know have university degrees. Why?
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    Probably studied a BS degree at a BS uni.
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    Then why take the degree?
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    (Original post by Khanman123)
    Probably studied a BS degree at a BS uni.
    My ex-girlfriend dad studied media studies - got a 2.2 and somehow become a very successful business consultant. He sent both of his girls to private school. But I guess that was a time when degrees were rare
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    (Original post by Entei)
    Then why take the degree?
    To avoid having to be something for 3 years.

    They believed the sales pitch that it was worth doing.
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    They dossed around at uni and got a crap degree
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    it could be like some of the above responses; degrees that aren't perceived to be particularly valuable, going to a "poor" uni, obtaining a bad grade etc.

    it could be that in a genuinely highly competitive jobs market, their good degree & grade from their good uni just wasn't enough to secure a higher paying job.
    sh*ts cold out there don't think that graduating uni gives you some next Willy Wonka-esque golden ticket to lucrative employment.
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    Several reasons why a lot of people working in jobs that they are seemingly well over educated for. But essentially it comes down to how competitive the jobs market is for graduates.

    For grad schemes, employers want to know your GCSEs, A-Levels, what your degree is in, what grade, which uni. They want to read answers to written questions. They want you to show skills on psychometric tests, phone interviews, assessment centres and interviews. Its not an easy process to go through. It becomes especially difficult if you get rejection after rejection with no feedback. An application probably takes a minimum of 2 hours up to maybe 6 or 8 hours to complete. It can be difficult to stay motivated whilst going through 50 applications. And all the while, youre competing against a group of people who are all likely good candidates for the role.

    I dont know the stats, but I imagine there is no where near the number of jobs available for the number of graduates each year. For those who don't manage to find themselves a grad scheme or equivalent level entry role, it can be difficult. Doing an apprenticeship or learning a trade doesnt seem to be a route many go down. That takes another few years and is essentially accepting that university was a waste of time with respect to securing a job. Bar work and similar roles are easy to find. They offer the opportunity to make money whilst requiring not very much skill. A lot of graduates then get trapped in that position - either can't find, or give up looking for roles related to their degree.
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    (Original post by Entei)
    So many bartenders I know have university degrees. Why?
    Bar tending can be a good stopgap for people whilst they look for alternative work... not everyone manages to get a graduate role off the bat, and it's better to have some money coming in still!
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    After you complete your degree you not gonna get student loan no more and bills ain't gonna pay themselves, so if you can't get job within studied field you take what there is, also degree doesn't secure you a well paid job its just another step to help you get prepared for it.
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    I know people who work in bars, supermarkets, retail, etc, who have science/engineering degrees. It's rough out there.
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    The degree is a prerequisite to get a job (on grad schemes and often other businesses may ask to have/prefer degrees). Other than having that bit of paper as evidence (if they even ask for it) then it is pretty meaningless and wont help get a job. What is even more meaningless is the name of the university on that paper (unless Oxbridge, but even then). What matters is what you can bring to the table, what can you do and what can you show to prove you can do it? Can't prove it? Well sorry, but a that 90% in finite element analysis isn't getting you diddly-squat son (unless it is in the JD [probs not doe]).

    Not to take away from the importance of a degree ofc, I'd say that at least 30-50% of competancy based interview answers will relate to a university project/course/problem for most grads. However if you can't answer them well enough, the invitation to the assessment day is going to the glue-eater from the poly across the road who actually knows their way around an interview, while you get to make fun of educated bartenders as you spend your dole money on pints at 12pm on a Monday with that lucrative Oxbridge degree in your back pocket.

    Once you actually get a degree, you'll find there is so much more to getting a job, the degree itself maybe <20% importance, and in my opinion that is pretty generous. Though it depends on the job you go for. Also, when I say 'you' above, I'm not saying you OP, just a general 'you' as in all you kids who think degrees are the be all and end all, you can easily get just as far/much further without one, especially these days.
 
 
 
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