Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Firstly, let me tell you my overall aim, I want to be a barrister and have a chambers in London.

    I have currently done a year at sixth form studying A-Level: Business, Sociology, English Language and an extended project. I chose these subjects because I didn't get the GCSES to study my first choice which was A-Level: Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry and English Literature. Having done a year of A-Levels, I am not enjoying the subjects, but I am still achieving high grades. I wish to study Law at Oxford and my question is should I do year 12 again and do different AS subjects? I was thinking of picking AS: History, English literature, still do the extended project and possibly AS business and also re-do my GCSES alongside. Once I done the first year and achieved my results, I will then do an AS in : mathematics, further Mathematics, biology and chemistry, and then finish the A2's at a further education college, then I will apply to study Law at Oxford. Or should I stick to my current A-Levels (bearing in mind that I achieved: 1 A, 3 B's , 3 C's and 4 D's in my GCSE's). If I did re-do my GCSE's and pick different AS subjects then later do an A2, would I be accepted by Oxford to study law or would I be at a disadvantage? And would this still allow me to become a Barrister?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Have you tried asking them nicely?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Oxford do look at GCSEs quite a lot, so I'm not sure you'd even get an interview with those, unless you had significant extenuating circumstances, or if you came close to top of your year in your school with those. Also, I don't think they'd look too kindly towards GCSE resits either. Also, this isn't really a set in stone rule, but I noticed that you don't take any facilitating subjects, which may be a bit of a disadvantage when applying, especially since none of them are directly related to Law (like Politics for example). That being said, I don't think it's impossible for you to get in - good luck. But if possible you may want to consider Cambridge since they look at GCSEs less and at AS marks more, and like to see that sort of improvement.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nega166)
    Oxford do look at GCSEs quite a lot, so I'm not sure you'd even get an interview with those, unless you had significant extenuating circumstances, or if you came close to top of your year in your school with those. Also, I don't think they'd look too kindly towards GCSE resits either. Also, this isn't really a set in stone rule, but I noticed that you don't take any facilitating subjects, which may be a bit of a disadvantage when applying, especially since none of them are directly related to Law (like Politics for example). That being said, I don't think it's impossible for you to get in - good luck. But if possible you may want to consider Cambridge since they look at GCSEs less and at AS marks more, and like to see that sort of improvement.
    What would you recommend to do? I really want to study Law at Oxford rather than Cambridge, there must be a way, I just need a little guidance. Say if I re-do 7 of my GCSE's that are below a grade B, and I get straight A's in the AS subjects and then A*'s in the A2's, would I have a stronger chance of getting in?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student101111111)
    What would you recommend to do? I really want to study Law at Oxford rather than Cambridge, there must be a way, I just need a little guidance. Say if I re-do 7 of my GCSE's that are below a grade B, and I get straight A's in the AS subjects and then A*'s in the A2's, would I have a stronger chance of getting in?
    In the nicest possible way, if you lacked conviction to get the GCSE results the first time round, what makes you think you'll be able to manage resiting GCSEs and getting 90%+ at AS and A2?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student101111111)
    What would you recommend to do? I really want to study Law at Oxford rather than Cambridge, there must be a way, I just need a little guidance. Say if I re-do 7 of my GCSE's that are below a grade B, and I get straight A's in the AS subjects and then A*'s in the A2's, would I have a stronger chance of getting in?
    Why the insistence on studying Law at Oxford rather than Cambridge? I'm a former Oxford law student and I honestly don't think there's a massive difference between the two (except in terms of exams, and Oxonians draw the short end of the stick in my opinion).

    Personally, my guess is that Oxford will take into account your first sitting of GCSEs, even if you do re-sit. Realistically, without extenuating circumstances, you would probably need a very good LNAT score and essay to stand a good chance of getting invited to interview since your GCSEs are unfortunately quite a bit below the average applicant. If you apply after A2 with all A*/A, that would probably put you in better stead as well.

    Also, I'm not sure I entirely understand your academic plans. You're currently doing Business, Sociology, English Language but you're considering switching to History, English literature, Business and then Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Biology and Chemistry? What's the rationale for this? If I were you, I'd focus on taking 3/ 4 subjects and doing extremely well in them rather than spreading across 7 AS/ A levels, which is hugely challenging and frankly unnecessary.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mishieru07)
    Why the insistence on studying Law at Oxford rather than Cambridge? I'm a former Oxford law student and I honestly don't think there's a massive difference between the two (except in terms of exams, and Oxonians draws the short end of the stick in my opinion).

    Personally, my guess is that Oxford will take into account your first sitting of GCSEs, even if you do re-sit. Realistically, without extenuating circumstances, you would probably need a very good LNAT score and essay to stand a good chance of getting invited to interview since your GCSEs are unfortunately quite a bit below the average applicant. If you apply after A2 with all A*/A, that would probably put you in better stead as well.

    Also, I'm not sure I entirely understand your academic plans. You're currently doing Business, Sociology, English Language but you're considering switching to History, English literature, Business and then Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Biology and Chemistry? What's the rationale for this? If I were you, I'd focus on taking 3/ 4 subjects and doing extremely well in them rather than spreading across 7 AS/ A levels, which is hugely challenging and frankly unnecessary.
    I'm a former Cambridge law student and I wholeheartedly concur with the content of this post - excellent.

    OP - remember that there are more universities offering Law/JP than just Oxford and Cambridge.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hatedigi)
    In the nicest possible way, if you lacked conviction to get the GCSE results the first time round, what makes you think you'll be able to manage resiting GCSEs and getting 90%+ at AS and A2?
    I have attained a student who went to Oxford to tutor me. When I aim to get something I don't stop until I've achieved my goal, no matter how difficult.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mishieru07)
    Why the insistence on studying Law at Oxford rather than Cambridge? I'm a former Oxford law student and I honestly don't think there's a massive difference between the two (except in terms of exams, and Oxonians draw the short end of the stick in my opinion).

    Personally, my guess is that Oxford will take into account your first sitting of GCSEs, even if you do re-sit. Realistically, without extenuating circumstances, you would probably need a very good LNAT score and essay to stand a good chance of getting invited to interview since your GCSEs are unfortunately quite a bit below the average applicant. If you apply after A2 with all A*/A, that would probably put you in better stead as well.

    Also, I'm not sure I entirely understand your academic plans. You're currently doing Business, Sociology, English Language but you're considering switching to History, English literature, Business and then Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Biology and Chemistry? What's the rationale for this? If I were you, I'd focus on taking 3/ 4 subjects and doing extremely well in them rather than spreading across 7 AS/ A levels, which is hugely challenging and frankly unnecessary.
    I want to study: Biology,Chemistry, maths and further maths after I have done the AS' because those were my original options but I didn't achieve the grades to study them.

    So in terms of A-Levels, do you think I should re-take year 12 with different A-Levels and re-do 7 of my GCSE's, or just stick to my current subjects and go into year 13? Taking into account that I don't have passion for the current subjects (even though I'm achieving high grades),I only chose them because they were pretty much the only available options i could take.

    In terms of choosing Oxford over Cambridge, I honestly admire the universities academic excellence, I love the atmosphere and love the idea of working in small groups and working long hours. I know there are other universities that teach Law but Oxford is the one for me.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Should I retake year 12 with different A-Levels? If so what subjects should I do? Or should I stick to my current A-Levels? Taking into consideration that if I do opt for the first option (re-doing year 12 with new subjects) it is highly likely that I would re-do most of my GCSE's alongside.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student101111111)
    I want to study: Biology,Chemistry, maths and further maths after I have done the AS' because those were my original options but I didn't achieve the grades to study them.

    So in terms of A-Levels, do you think I should re-take year 12 with different A-Levels and re-do 7 of my GCSE's, or just stick to my current subjects and go into year 13? Taking into account that I don't have passion for the current subjects (even though I'm achieving high grades),I only chose them because they were pretty much the only available options i could take.

    In terms of choosing Oxford over Cambridge, I honestly admire the universities academic excellence, I love the atmosphere and love the idea of working in small groups and working long hours. I know there are other universities that teach Law but Oxford is the one for me.
    I can understand how the above reasons differentiate Oxbridge from the other universities (as far as teaching goes), but I still don't understand your insistence on applying to Oxford ahead of Cambridge. Cambridge also has a supervision/ tutorial system and a similar amount of work.

    Paging BrasenoseAdm for help - any advice on whether OP should stick with his A levels (Business, Sociology and English Language) or retake different subjects? OP's GCSEs are 1 A, 3 B's , 3 C's and 4 D's.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mishieru07)
    I can understand how the above reasons differentiate Oxbridge from the other universities (as far as teaching goes), but I still don't understand your insistence on applying to Oxford ahead of Cambridge. Cambridge also has a supervision/ tutorial system and a similar amount of work.

    Paging BrasenoseAdm for help - any advice on whether OP should stick with his A levels (Business, Sociology and English Language) or retake different subjects? OP's GCSEs are 1 A, 3 B's , 3 C's and 4 D's.
    Firstly, allow me to thank you for the advice ( it has really helped). Secondly, I believe I will choose Cambridge over Oxford, on the basis that Oxford look at GCSE's where as Cambridge don't tend to (however, this could change) . Also, If I do decide to retake year 12, I will most likely pick: English literature, History, Psychology or Sociology, and Business ( as well as an EPQ, and I'm currently undertaking a DofE Gold award). Do you think this would give me a higher chance of getting into Cambridge?(as opposed to my current subjects).
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student101111111)
    Firstly, allow me to thank you for the advice ( it has really helped). Secondly, I believe I will choose Cambridge over Oxford, on the basis that Oxford look at GCSE's where as Cambridge don't tend to (however, this could change) . Also, If I do decide to retake year 12, I will most likely pick: English literature, History, Psychology or Sociology, and Business ( as well as an EPQ, and I'm currently undertaking a DofE Gold award). Do you think this would give me a higher chance of getting into Cambridge?(as opposed to my current subjects).
    Cambridge doesn't ignore GCSEs per se, but they tend to play greater emphasis on AS.

    You're better off making a separate post in the Cambridge forum, but in the meantime here are some links:
    http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/study/und...jects/law.html
    http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/study/und...-subjects.html
    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...ubject-matters
    https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/undergrad...-combinations/
    https://www.chu.cam.ac.uk/study-us/u.../subjects/law/

    Broadly, they seem to favour facilitating subjects, so English literature and History would certainly be fine. Psychology/ Sociology might be acceptable since you're applying for Law (a social science), but I haven't seen Business mentioned. If you want to play it very safe, consider swapping out Psychology/ Sociology and Business for more "traditional" subjects like Geography and Economics. You should definitely consult the admissions officers before you finalize your choice.
    • Official TSR Representative
    Online

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mishieru07)
    Cambridge doesn't ignore GCSEs per se, but they tend to play greater emphasis on AS.

    You're better off making a separate post in the Cambridge forum, but in the meantime here are some links:
    http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/study/und...jects/law.html
    http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/study/und...-subjects.html
    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...ubject-matters
    https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/undergrad...-combinations/
    https://www.chu.cam.ac.uk/study-us/u.../subjects/law/

    Broadly, they seem to favour facilitating subjects, so English literature and History would certainly be fine. Psychology/ Sociology might be acceptable since you're applying for Law (a social science), but I haven't seen Business mentioned. If you want to play it very safe, consider swapping out Psychology/ Sociology and Business for more "traditional" subjects like Geography and Economics. You should definitely consult the admissions officers before you finalize your choice.
    Thanks for the tag. We are on holiday this week so this is a brief reply. We think the UCAS reference ought to explain the large number of resits as this is highly unusual & not a typical success trajectory.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 31, 2017
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Should Spain allow Catalonia to declare independence?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.