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    I'm mostly going to apply for Civil engineering because I don't have physics.
    Cardiff however, don't require physics for mech eng.
    I'd love to study beyond just structures and buildings. something that moves.
    do you think I can get away with a personal statement that can be applied to both?
    also mech eng requires physics in almost all unis. but Cardiff don't, do you think they can get someone with no physics a level up to speed? I had A* in gcse but tbh didn't really find it interesting cos of the teacher (mega boring person)
    anyone with no physics who applied to engineering would reassure me so much.
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    I've just finished 1st year cub eng and we had a materials and statics module in first semester which was only mechanics and taught us the level of physics needed for engineering at first.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    I've just finished 1st year cub eng and we had a materials and statics module in first semester which was only mechanics and taught us the level of physics needed for engineering at first.
    nice, what's cub eng btw?
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    nice, what's cub eng btw?
    Fml didn't see it spell checked, civ.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Fml didn't see it spell checked, civ.
    I was like there's another branch of eng.? anyway what uni do you go to?
    and what a levels did you do?
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    I was like there's another branch of eng.? anyway what uni do you go to?
    and what a levels did you do?
    I did maths, physics, geology and geography... oh and an EPQ on astrobiology, currently at surrey.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    I'm mostly going to apply for Civil engineering because I don't have physics.
    Cardiff however, don't require physics for mech eng.
    I'd love to study beyond just structures and buildings. something that moves.
    do you think I can get away with a personal statement that can be applied to both?
    also mech eng requires physics in almost all unis. but Cardiff don't, do you think they can get someone with no physics a level up to speed? I had A* in gcse but tbh didn't really find it interesting cos of the teacher (mega boring person)
    anyone with no physics who applied to engineering would reassure me so much.
    Universities do offer the foundation year programmes to keep you up to speed, however I'm not too sure if you want to go for this route. Its worth reading up on tho, and calling the universities and asking them questions about it. One of my friends will be doing systems and electronic engineering and when she applied to unis, they gave her the foundation year option bc she didn't have physics (she did comp sci, maths and a btec). This could differ for the uni, but like I said, its worth reading up on or calling them about
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    Smack
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    (Original post by ravioliyears)
    Universities do offer the foundation year programmes to keep you up to speed, however I'm not too sure if you want to go for this route. Its worth reading up on tho, and calling the universities and asking them questions about it. One of my friends will be doing systems and electronic engineering and when she applied to unis, they gave her the foundation year option bc she didn't have physics (she did comp sci, maths and a btec). This could differ for the uni, but like I said, its worth reading up on or calling them about
    yes I did see that Southampton offer found. year but I'm honestly not keen on spending an extra year in uni. thank you however.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    I'm mostly going to apply for Civil engineering because I don't have physics.
    Cardiff however, don't require physics for mech eng.
    I'd love to study beyond just structures and buildings. something that moves.
    do you think I can get away with a personal statement that can be applied to both?
    also mech eng requires physics in almost all unis. but Cardiff don't, do you think they can get someone with no physics a level up to speed? I had A* in gcse but tbh didn't really find it interesting cos of the teacher (mega boring person)
    anyone with no physics who applied to engineering would reassure me so much.
    Possibly... the main thing they're looking at are your grades so if they're up to par I don't think you'll have much trouble getting offers.

    Have you looked at general degrees?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Possibly... the main thing they're looking at are your grades so if they're up to par I don't think you'll have much trouble getting offers.

    Have you looked at general degrees?
    i have, cant find much at the unis i want to go to. i kind of prefer specialising anyway. im still waiting for next month to come to see where i want to take my application to. its nerve wracking deciding before you have your AS
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    Was gonna pm that you can ask me any questions you have on civ eng but saw that you have it disabled, I'm also currently on a summer placement for it.

    (Original post by ihatePE)
    i have, cant find much at the unis i want to go to. i kind of prefer specialising anyway. im still waiting for next month to come to see where i want to take my application to. its nerve wracking deciding before you have your AS
    I will add that civ eng isn't massively specialised until later on as there are many areas in it like structures or geotechnics. What I like on my placement currently is all of the forces that I need to consider though considering all the calculations I did I haven't learnt at uni (apparently half of them aren't taught at all here) it was pretty bloody hard.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Was gonna pm that you can ask me any questions you have on civ eng but saw that you have it disabled, I'm also currently on a summer placement for it.



    I will add that civ eng isn't massively specialised until later on as there are many areas in it like structures or geotechnics. What I like on my placement currently is all of the forces that I need to consider though considering all the calculations I did I haven't learnt at uni (apparently half of them aren't taught at all here) it was pretty bloody hard.
    i know im sorry, i dont like keeping my tsr ''open'' much. taking civil engineering i say is probably more specialised than general eng. ? idk but from the name of the course im more attracted to civil. do you learn more than just buildings? mechanical interests me cos it seems more wide spread in areas but then the physics for it would be quite hard, even if unis like birmingham and cardiff dont require it. im pretty nervous. would you say civil engineering is more maths and less physics?
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    i know im sorry, i dont like keeping my tsr ''open'' much. taking civil engineering i say is probably more specialised than general eng. ? idk but from the name of the course im more attracted to civil. do you learn more than just buildings? mechanical interests me cos it seems more wide spread in areas but then the physics for it would be quite hard, even if unis like birmingham and cardiff dont require it. im pretty nervous. would you say civil engineering is more maths and less physics?
    Physics is essentially applied maths, once you get to university level. A lot of the material that is covered at university is applied maths/physics. If you are decent enough at maths you should not have any problem learning the physics.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Physics is essentially applied maths, once you get to university level. A lot of the material that is covered at university is applied maths/physics. If you are decent enough at maths you should not have any problem learning the physics.
    i was looking at the mechanics modules and the first thing you learn is electrical technology. that gave me flash backs to gcses physics about ohms laws and circuits, not very good flashback too. I got A* in physics gcse regardless but guessed my way through it by doing all the ''maths'' based questions right. i obviously cant do that at degree level so i need to know if there's enough help at uni for people without physics.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    i know im sorry, i dont like keeping my tsr ''open'' much. taking civil engineering i say is probably more specialised than general eng. ? idk but from the name of the course im more attracted to civil. do you learn more than just buildings? mechanical interests me cos it seems more wide spread in areas but then the physics for it would be quite hard, even if unis like birmingham and cardiff dont require it. im pretty nervous. would you say civil engineering is more maths and less physics?
    You need to understand the physics which is taught in first year but what I learnt in first year I didn't do in A level (apart from learning what bending moments are and force equilibrium) as it was beyond it. My materials/statics and stress analysis examinations gave all the equations that were needed (they are eternally long). A level physics helps you understand the basics before going into the course whereas maths there is a module which teaches up to FM standard (hated it, thank god I don't need to ever use the hardest stuff in it) rather than going beyond what is possible at A level. I would say its more maths in terms of the career because you follow a design code called eurocode and by law you have to follow the theory in it like equations for traffic loads. Though during the course there is more physics theory taught, stress analysis can be pretty hard with some of the content taught (take into account some unis may have different modules though most likely similar content). It'll be harder learning the physics theory modules outside of the design ones but if you seek the support you need it shouldn't be that overwhelming. You will need to understand physics well in your career but there are documents which you can read like eurocode which you reference in it and you learn a lot of necessary theory in your degree.

    General engineering courses I find strange since it isn't truly specialised apart from cambridge where you get taught a metric **** ton, even learning mech eng in first year and you actually start to do civ eng specific stuff in your third year. When I say civ eng is also rather general it was more that there are a lot of areas within it. Civ eng is focused around construction but there is a lot of areas within it which you then specialise in. What appealed to me most about civ eng is the possible scale of it and its impact on society. Whilst I may be biased but civ eng is probably the most important engineering discipline due to transport links, infrastructure and the ability to develop large structures to overcome a problem.

    The main specialisations in civ eng are stuctural, transport (this shares quite a bit with structural with certain projects), geotechnics, water and environmental, also below gonna list each of these a few specialist areas that come to my mind. You wouldn't specifically follow one of these next levels of specialisations but during your career you can develop improved knowledge in a few fields which you can then be considered an expert in (obviously when you are a senior engineer). Though some areas you will most likely need to be in a rather senior level to do a important part of the design such as dams, reason for this is because failure is extremely devastating. The idea of failure in civil engineering is what I find scariest because of the scale of what you may be designing (I say design a lot but that is one of the two major aspects, the other is contracting which involves managing a project).

    Structural: buildings, bridges, dams, earthquakes, defense*. Also weirdly but you can work in non construction related engineering roles in this, if you manage to follow a strange path in choosing a career and later modules you could design structures of aircraft or even spacecraft.

    *only thing I truly know about defense along with certain government projects is bomb proofing and construction of military installations. I can't give much detail on this because when I asked my lecturer about this sector and why there's not much info on it he said "people who go to work on such projects tend to sign an agreement where they cannot talk about it".

    Transportation: highways, bridges, computer systems, aviation ( e.g. runways), maritime (ports).

    Geotechnics: foundation and earthwork design, retaining structures (basically hold back cliffs etc.), ground surveying, risk assessment (I would consider this the most important part of creating a project).

    Environmental/water: pollution, groundwater/flooding, wastewater/sewage, infrastructure.

    Environmental tends to be not related to a lot of civil engineering projects and doesn't share much with a lot of the discipline but its possible to go into a career for it through a civ eng degree (a lot also say "and environmental engineering". My university has masters modules for water and environmental but its quite a bit different to the other parts like structures. Water modules in the first year are pretty hard as its completely new content from anything you are taught before.

    Anyway hopefully what I've said helps and sorry about waffling on... quite a bit.




    If you want to know about how I did, I achieved 84% marks in my 1st year and I had a tendency to go to sleep at 2-3am and start nodding off in some lectures so I had to read intensively into some content... oh and one exam I revised for 3 days before it. Living independently helps you achieve some miraculous things.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    You need to understand the physics which is taught in first year but what I learnt in first year I didn't do in A level (apart from learning what bending moments are and force equilibrium) as it was beyond it. My materials/statics and stress analysis examinations gave all the equations that were needed (they are eternally long). A level physics helps you understand the basics before going into the course whereas maths there is a module which teaches up to FM standard (hated it, thank god I don't need to ever use the hardest stuff in it) rather than going beyond what is possible at A level. I would say its more maths in terms of the career because you follow a design code called eurocode and by law you have to follow the theory in it like equations for traffic loads. Though during the course there is more physics theory taught, stress analysis can be pretty hard with some of the content taught (take into account some unis may have different modules though most likely similar content). It'll be harder learning the physics theory modules outside of the design ones but if you seek the support you need it shouldn't be that overwhelming. You will need to understand physics well in your career but there are documents which you can read like eurocode which you reference in it and you learn a lot of necessary theory in your degree.

    General engineering courses I find strange since it isn't truly specialised apart from cambridge where you get taught a metric **** ton, even learning mech eng in first year and you actually start to do civ eng specific stuff in your third year. When I say civ eng is also rather general it was more that there are a lot of areas within it. Civ eng is focused around construction but there is a lot of areas within it which you then specialise in. What appealed to me most about civ eng is the possible scale of it and its impact on society. Whilst I may be biased but civ eng is probably the most important engineering discipline due to transport links, infrastructure and the ability to develop large structures to overcome a problem.

    The main specialisations in civ eng are stuctural, transport (this shares quite a bit with structural with certain projects), geotechnics, water and environmental, also below gonna list each of these a few specialist areas that come to my mind. You wouldn't specifically follow one of these next levels of specialisations but during your career you can develop improved knowledge in a few fields which you can then be considered an expert in (obviously when you are a senior engineer). Though some areas you will most likely need to be in a rather senior level to do a important part of the design such as dams, reason for this is because failure is extremely devastating. The idea of failure in civil engineering is what I find scariest because of the scale of what you may be designing (I say design a lot but that is one of the two major aspects, the other is contracting which involves managing a project).

    Structural: buildings, bridges, dams, earthquakes, defense*. Also weirdly but you can work in non construction related engineering roles in this, if you manage to follow a strange path in choosing a career and later modules you could design structures of aircraft or even spacecraft.

    *only thing I truly know about defense along with certain government projects is bomb proofing and construction of military installations. I can't give much detail on this because when I asked my lecturer about this sector and why there's not much info on it he said "people who go to work on such projects tend to sign an agreement where they cannot talk about it".

    Transportation: highways, bridges, computer systems, aviation ( e.g. runways), maritime (ports).

    Geotechnics: foundation and earthwork design, retaining structures (basically hold back cliffs etc.), ground surveying, risk assessment (I would consider this the most important part of creating a project).

    Environmental/water: pollution, groundwater/flooding, wastewater/sewage, infrastructure.

    Environmental tends to be not related to a lot of civil engineering projects and doesn't share much with a lot of the discipline but its possible to go into a career for it through a civ eng degree (a lot also say "and environmental engineering". My university has masters modules for water and environmental but its quite a bit different to the other parts like structures. Water modules in the first year are pretty hard as its completely new content from anything you are taught before.

    Anyway hopefully what I've said helps and sorry about waffling on... quite a bit.
    no dont worry, that was a reassuring read. i finished year 12 completely chose civil eng. on my own and didnt have anything to go off on but a few vague videos and articles. i really like the fact that you can go a different path to the usual civil eng. construction route. i compare mechanicsl with civil sometimes and get a little bit jealous of its variety, thinking my options can't prepare me for comfortable years in mechanical. but seeing as how civil can branch further it really is nice to know. i was going to more or less apply to 2 mech eng and 3 civil, but after this i think i'd stick to 1 mech and 4 civil cos im quite impressed
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    no dont worry, that was a reassuring read. i finished year 12 completely chose civil eng. on my own and didnt have anything to go off on but a few vague videos and articles. i really like the fact that you can go a different path to the usual civil eng. construction route. i compare mechanicsl with civil sometimes and get a little bit jealous of its variety, thinking my options can't prepare me for comfortable years in mechanical. but seeing as how civil can branch further it really is nice to know. i was going to more or less apply to 2 mech eng and 3 civil, but after this i think i'd stick to 1 mech and 4 civil cos im quite impressed
    When you say the usual construction route what was your original viewpoint of what it involved? It is nearly entirely focused around construction or management/planning but there are lots of areas within it. A career in civil engineering is around construction but as said about following a strange path in structures you can go into other areas outside of it. My original viewpoint early on with choosing it was like "you design big buildings", I didn't think about the whole variety of stuff that is considered within it apart from geotechnics since I did geology. I chose it after seeing it in a prospectus and was really impressed when I went to visit a open day though I didn't put that uni on my list of 5.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    When you say the usual construction route what was your original viewpoint of what it involved? It is nearly entirely focused around construction or management/planning but there are lots of areas within it. A career in civil engineering is around construction but as said about following a strange path in structures you can go into other areas outside of it. My original viewpoint early on with choosing it was like "you design big buildings", I didn't think about the whole variety of stuff that is considered within it apart from geotechnics since I did geology. I chose it after seeing it in a prospectus and was really impressed when I went to visit a open day though I didn't put that uni on my list of 5.
    O I should have worded that better. when I meant construction, I was thinking of working on a building site in the city, surrounded by cranes and drillings. I don't mind that though, I just love to explore other stuff as well like working with the environment like sea defences (since I kind of like geography) and even military. can you even work on machines? are there routes for that if you know of any.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    O I should have worded that better. when I meant construction, I was thinking of working on a building site in the city, surrounded by cranes and drillings. I don't mind that though, I just love to explore other stuff as well like working with the environment like sea defences (since I kind of like geography) and even military. can you even work on machines? are there routes for that if you know of any.
    Ahh ok fair enough. I would say when talking about careers in civil engineering before specialisations there are two career types. Contracting which is managing a project which is what you described but there's a lot more involved like resource acquisition. Then there's consultancy which is the design of a project and is nearly entirely office based, this includes designing dimensions of members like columns and telling a contractor what materials need to be used (this is what I'm working in). Machines I would say very unlikely, civil engineering as a degree will teach you nearly entirely about static structures and thus do not move or involve reactions like ignition in an engine. The physics is really withstanding forces etc. With the example of aircraft you would be working on the structure such as the chassis rather than the engines since the structure is not the source of movement.

    With military sectors it involves construction projects which are military in nature such as airbases or possibly missile sites.
 
 
 
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