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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Ahh ok fair enough. I would say when talking about careers in civil engineering before specialisations there are two career types. Contracting which is managing a project which is what you described but there's a lot more involved like resource acquisition. Then there's consultancy which is the design of a project and is nearly entirely office based, this includes designing dimensions of members like columns and telling a contractor what materials need to be used (this is what I'm working in). Machines I would say very unlikely, civil engineering as a degree will teach you nearly entirely about static structures and thus do not move or involve reactions like ignition in an engine. The physics is really withstanding forces etc. With the example of aircraft you would be working on the structure such as the chassis rather than the engines since the structure is not the source of movement.

    With military sectors it involves construction projects which are military in nature such as airbases or possibly missile sites.
    I really don't mind either contracting nor consulting tbh, though as a sitting down person I probably prefer consulting more lul. I see, I really took an interesting in mechanics maths anyway, M1 was very engaging especially with the statics (I honestly dreaded forces on slopes ew)
    this was a really good and useful talk for me, thank you so much. It makes me more decisive, thank god cos I probably went back and fro a million times before this.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    I really don't mind either contracting nor consulting tbh, though as a sitting down person I probably prefer consulting more lul. I see, I really took an interesting in mechanics maths anyway, M1 was very engaging especially with the statics (I honestly dreaded forces on slopes ew)
    this was a really good and useful talk for me, thank you so much. It makes me more decisive, thank god cos I probably went back and fro a million times before this.
    No problem, just remember with my reference to static structures that I mean that they generally do not move since the degree is focused towards buildings etc. which (hopefully) do not move so do not look towards moving parts such as machines, don't want to cause confusion with that when it comes to possible careers. I'm honestly surprised at how many people haven't even heard of civ eng, no one at my college knew about it even though we had a series of posters for each engineering discipline. Though then also consider that some aspects of civ eng won't be as mechanics (referring to physics type)/physics intensive, structural is the only area really that is entirely physics.
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    i was looking at the mechanics modules and the first thing you learn is electrical technology. that gave me flash backs to gcses physics about ohms laws and circuits, not very good flashback too. I got A* in physics gcse regardless but guessed my way through it by doing all the ''maths'' based questions right. i obviously cant do that at degree level so i need to know if there's enough help at uni for people without physics.
    If you're decent enough at maths you shouldn't have much problems picking up the physics, as it is essentially maths. And if you got an A* in GCSE physics, I wouldn't be concerned about this.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    No problem, just remember with my reference to static structures that I mean that they generally do not move since the degree is focused towards buildings etc. which (hopefully) do not move so do not look towards moving parts such as machines, don't want to cause confusion with that when it comes to possible careers. I'm honestly surprised at how many people haven't even heard of civ eng, no one at my college knew about it even though we had a series of posters for each engineering discipline. Though then also consider that some aspects of civ eng won't be as mechanics (referring to physics type)/physics intensive, structural is the only area really that is entirely physics.
    Hi I have a few questions. when you're going into civil engineering, I know there's a few discipline like transport, environment and structural and water etc. how do you choose to specialise? I'm looking at the module structure of Cardiff uni and I don't see the options they provide that can lead you to routes you want. also if you can, what route are you taking?
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    Hi I have a few questions. when you're going into civil engineering, I know there's a few discipline like transport, environment and structural and water etc. how do you choose to specialise? I'm looking at the module structure of Cardiff uni and I don't see the options they provide that can lead you to routes you want. also if you can, what route are you taking?
    With a degree in civil & structural engineering, you can apply to a wide range of different jobs after graduation. You don't need to specialise in one area during your degree, e.g. transport, and then be bound to that discipline upon graduation.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    With a degree in civil & structural engineering, you can apply to a wide range of different jobs after graduation. You don't need to specialise in one area during your degree, e.g. transport, and then be bound to that discipline upon graduation.
    OOOO how does that happen, do you need to go into further training or does the degree prepare you for much of it?
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    OOOO how does that happen, do you need to go into further training or does the degree prepare you for much of it?
    The degree qualifies you for graduate level positions, which you ideally start applying for in your final year. If there is something in particular that takes your fancy, you may be able to do an MSc in it, which may help you secure a relevant position.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    The degree qualifies you for graduate level positions, which you ideally start applying for in your final year. If there is something in particular that takes your fancy, you may be able to do an MSc in it, which may help you secure a relevant position.
    I'm planning on doing 5 years (4 years Meng and 1 yr placement), what does it mean if I'm gonna do MSC in structural eng? do I get 2 masters or something? I don't understand why in engineering you have an undergrad masters
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    I'm planning on doing 5 years (4 years Meng and 1 yr placement), what does it mean if I'm gonna do MSC in structural eng? do I get 2 masters or something? I don't understand why in engineering you have an undergrad masters
    If you do an MEng and an MSc, you have two masters degrees; this is generally quite unnecessary.

    Undergrad masters exist because UK degrees are a year shorter than their European and US counter parts. So they added an extra year ... but then called it a masters ... it's complicated.
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    To answer your question, it's quite easy. All i did was write a personal statement for civil engineering (talked about a love for maths and civil engineering related stuff). But i didn't actually say civil once. I just said engineering. Still got offers from both civ and mech courses.

    Also a lot of unis still need physics for civil. Or at least taking M2 and/or further maths
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    (Original post by stereoashhh)
    To answer your question, it's quite easy. All i did was write a personal statement for civil engineering (talked about a love for maths and civil engineering related stuff). But i didn't actually say civil once. I just said engineering. Still got offers from both civ and mech courses.

    Also a lot of unis still need physics for civil. Or at least taking M2 and/or further maths
    nice, i thought about just being vague in sense of engineering too but needed someone who actually done it cos im so scared of being rejected. ive only come across top unis like oxbridge and imperial that require phys and M2, which im not applying to hehe
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    nice, i thought about just being vague in sense of engineering too but needed someone who actually done it cos im so scared of being rejected. ive only come across top unis like oxbridge and imperial that require phys and M2, which im not applying to hehe
    I see. I know Manchester wants M2 if you didn't take physics so I assume other good unis may have similar stances. You're better off checking each uni youre applying to individually though. Maybe most don't mind.

    There's also the opposite. Last time i checked, UCL didn't even require maths. Though they're certainly an exception. And you gotta take extra classes to catch up anyway.
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    (Original post by stereoashhh)
    I see. I know Manchester wants M2 if you didn't take physics so I assume other good unis may have similar stances. You're better off checking each uni youre applying to individually though. Maybe most don't mind.

    There's also the opposite. Last time i checked, UCL didn't even require maths. Though they're certainly an exception. And you gotta take extra classes to catch up anyway.
    i've checked every uni already so im good, i went to ucl too and didnt really like their lecture room, it was in the basement... loool so which are you going for? civil or mech?
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    (Original post by ihatePE)
    Hi I have a few questions. when you're going into civil engineering, I know there's a few discipline like transport, environment and structural and water etc. how do you choose to specialise? I'm looking at the module structure of Cardiff uni and I don't see the options they provide that can lead you to routes you want. also if you can, what route are you taking?
    (Original post by ihatePE)
    OOOO how does that happen, do you need to go into further training or does the degree prepare you for much of it?

    Specialisation is mostly from experience during your career, masters years help with starting to specialise but you won't suddenly be an expert. Different universities have different masters courses, mine offers structures, bridges, geotechnical, water/environmental and management. Currently I'm looking more towards structures relating to highways (on my placement im working in a highways structures team, this office also has a buildings structures team).

    (Original post by ihatePE)
    I'm planning on doing 5 years (4 years Meng and 1 yr placement), what does it mean if I'm gonna do MSC in structural eng? do I get 2 masters or something? I don't understand why in engineering you have an undergrad masters
    The MEng is an integrated masters, tends to be that you can pick and choose modules whereas an MSc keeps you in specific modules, you wouldn't do an MEng followed by an MSc, in my masters year since I'm in the MEng I can choose any MSc modules.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Specialisation is mostly from experience during your career, masters years help with starting to specialise but you won't suddenly be an expert. Different universities have different masters courses, mine offers structures, bridges, geotechnical, water/environmental and management. Currently I'm looking more towards structures relating to highways (on my placement im working in a highways structures team, this office also has a buildings structures team).



    The MEng is an integrated masters, tends to be that you can pick and choose modules whereas an MSc keeps you in specific modules, you wouldn't do an MEng followed by an MSc, in my masters year since I'm in the MEng I can choose any MSc modules.
    thanks for your answers PRSOM
 
 
 
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