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Our Rights Vs the Police??? Watch

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    General question, but I was just wondering if there are any key rights we as the public should know when handling the police. Like do we have to give our name? Does the police officer have to give his/her's badge number when we request it? It would be nice to know
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    (Original post by GreenTeeKid)
    General question, but I was just wondering if there are any key rights we as the public should know when handling the police. Like do we have to give our name? Does the police officer have to give his/her's badge number when we request it? It would be nice to know
    They cant demand you name or address without good reason. However, refusing to will probably make them think youre up to something. You can take their badge number yes. Thats all I know, as I have never had to deal with the police in this manner.

    Citizens Advice also give a detailed summary of their powers: https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/la...police-powers/
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    It largely depends on the situation. Police almost always have to give a name and shoulder number, though. If they want your name, you can always ask them why they're asking for it. They can and sometimes do ask questions that you legally don't have to answer.

    Some common misconceptions seem to be based on differences between US and UK laws. In the UK, police have a lot more legal power to enter buildings without warrants. They also don't need a reason to pull somebody over while they're driving. Those seem like frequently misunderstood powers.

    If you think that something that happened to you was illegal, try to get some evidence of what happened and contact the IPCC and the inspector at whichever station the officers claimed to be from. Fighting over it in the street isn't likely to get you as good a result.

    A good rule for dealing with the police is probably to remember that they are often very pressed for time. They don't want to spend all day on a single minor offence, they've probably got other crimes to investigate too. If you can give them the info they need to discount you (and quickly) then they'll often be out of your hair before too long.
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    Be really calm.
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    It is far easier to comply with their requests and be polite.

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    There's no such thing as a 'quick chat', always refuse any questions until you've spoken to a lawyer if they are asking you about anything remotely serious.

    Never admit to a crime. It's not up to the police to decide if you're guilty and they won't go easy on you for admitting it. Juries decide guilt, judges decide punishment.. the police just try to get prosecutions. Even if you are guilty never admit to it until you've spoken to a lawyer.

    If the police ever ask you how fast you were going, the answer is always at or below the speed limit. 31 in a 30 is still breaking the law, don't be the idiot who tries "oh just a few mph over the limit" line and instantly incriminates themselves.

    Lastly - don't break the law to begin with
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    (Original post by Ezisola)
    There's no such thing as a 'quick chat', always refuse any questions until you've spoken to a lawyer if they are asking you about anything remotely serious.
    If you know you have done nothing wrong there is no need to lawyer up.

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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    If you know you have done nothing wrong there is no need to lawyer up.

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    Worst possible advice
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    (Original post by Ezisola)
    Worst possible advice
    What is the point of lawyering up when expensive and pointless.
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    What is the point of lawyering up when expensive and pointless.
    You are entitled to free legal advice in this country.

    It worries me that you are giving legal advice yet didn't know this.
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    (Original post by Ezisola)
    You are entitled to free legal representation in this country.

    It worries me that you are giving legal advice yet didn't know this.
    I would not trust free legal representation, that is why I have a lawyer.

    There is no need to lawyer up every time the police ask you a question.
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    I would not trust free legal representation, that is why I have a lawyer.

    There is no need to lawyer up every time the police ask you a question.
    You will of course have noticed that I specified when you should seek legal advice and it was not every time the police ask you a question.
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    (Original post by Ezisola)
    You will of course have noticed that I specified when you should seek legal advice and it was not every time the police ask you a question.
    It isn't necessary. If the police ask if you are carrying drugs (a serious offence) do you lawyer up?
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    It isn't necessary. If the police ask if you are carrying drugs (a serious offence) do you lawyer up?
    That depends if you are then going to consent to a search.
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    (Original post by Ezisola)
    That depends if you are then going to consent to a search.
    Oh course I would, I have nothing to hide.
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    Oh course I would, I have nothing to hide.
    Then no need

    If you were however actually accused of a crime (detained, charged etc) then you absolutely should seek legal advice before talking to the police , regardless of your innocence.
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    Let's not be naive here. The police, especially the Met are not above a bit of corruption, racism or anything that gets them prosecutions, lying or being economical with the truth. Always lawyer up. I have a grandson in the Met and the stuff he tells me makes me wonder that it needs a good clean-up.
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    (Original post by Ezisola)
    That depends if you are then going to consent to a search.
    It's not usually a matter of consent. The police don't need a huge amount of evidence before they can search somebody (regardless of consent).

    Something that people might not know, though, is that they can always ask to be searched by an officer of the same gender, unless the delay could be dangerous (ie, if they're accused of having a weapon that they might be about to use).
 
 
 
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