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Black privilege Watch

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    black privilege isn't a thing. white people just see attempts at trying to correct white privilege as black privilege.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Police saying that they are going 'n*gger hunting' is justifiable?
    Where and when?
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    Of course black privilege exists. It's the privilege that white privilege is slowly being eroded. How dare black people not let whites have the advantage any longer?
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Where and when?
    "He quotes from Joseph Hunte’s report, ****** Hunting in England published in 1966 by the Commonwealth Institute. After documenting the ready use of dogs against black people and the frequent instances of overt racialist abuse, Hunte wrote that ‘it has been confirmed from reliable sources that sergeants and constables do leave police stations with the express purpose of going n*gger-hunting.’ Such allegations were, we learn from a police commander who worked in Brixton at the time of the report, ‘basically true.'
    http://www.richardwebster.net/policingracism.html
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    "He quotes from Joseph Hunte’s report, ****** Hunting in England published in 1966 by the Commonwealth Institute. After documenting the ready use of dogs against black people and the frequent instances of overt racialist abuse, Hunte wrote that ‘it has been confirmed from reliable sources that sergeants and constables do leave police stations with the express purpose of going n*gger-hunting.’ Such allegations were, we learn from a police commander who worked in Brixton at the time of the report, ‘basically true.'
    http://www.richardwebster.net/policingracism.html
    1966? And there was me thinking you were debating contemporary conditions, relevant now.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    1966? And there was me thinking you were debating contemporary conditions, relevant now.
    If you read the conversation, you would see that I was talking about racism during mass immigration (which occurred in the 1950s to 60s) to which the guy I was responding to said that the racism was justified.

    The secret policeman was filmed in 2003. A policeman was heard saying "I'll stop him cos he's a paki". Another said that Stephen Lawrence deserved to die, that his death was a good memory. When asked what he thought of the killers, he says "they've done for this country what others should f***ng do".

    The secret policeman returned in 2008:
    In an interview for the programme, Mr Fuller, who has two undergraduate degrees and two postgraduate degrees, said he personally felt the need to be overqualified in order to be promoted. He added: "BME officers will often have to work twice as hard to be recognised, to compete with their peers and that is a big concern." His comments appeared to be backed up by a survey of members of the Black Police Association undertaken by Panorama. It found that just under two-thirds of respondents believed their career had been hindered by their race. And more than seven in ten claimed to have experienced racism at work. One member said: "I've been treated worse than my parents in the sixties. It's all very well hidden, no racist words - you're just never good enough for promotion." Another said: "Racism is very much alive and well in the Police Service. Many white officers will not even acknowledge a Black officer at times and you are made to feel that you are not welcome in the Police service."

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.e...-on-racism/amp
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Err mate, racism is the systematic oppression of people based on race and/or ethnicity. The system is made by and in favour of white people, so how is reverse racism a thing?? That being said white people can face prejudice but I wouldn't go as far as calling it racism.
    You did me a favour by replying to them before me.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    If you read the conversation, you would see that I was talking about racism during mass immigration (which occurred in the 1950s to 60s) to which the guy I was responding to said that the racism was justified.
    Immigration at that time was a small fraction of what it is now, about 136,000 immigrants in 1961 at its height (and that is a gross figure). Now the net figure is three to five times higher.

    So when do you think is the period of mass immigration, the 1950s to 1960s, or now?
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Immigration at that time was a small fraction of what it is now, about 136,000 immigrants in 1961 at its height (and that is a gross figure). Now the net figure is three to five times higher.

    So when do you think is the period of mass immigration, the 1950s to 1960s, or now?
    I just said that I was talking about immigration in the 1950s and 60s, which is why I made reference to Joseph Hunte's report.

    Why is this relevant anyway?
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    I just said that I was talking about immigration in the 1950s and 60s, which is why I made reference to Joseph Hunte's report.

    Why is this relevant anyway?
    Just because I am confused by why the 1950s is relevant to the topic under discussion, which is a supposedly current issue, not a historical one. That is all.
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    Wow. This thread needs a little more Martin Luther King and a little less Malcolm X.
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    It depends on the context and circumstances. I can think of a few things that qualify:

    A black person has the privilege of being able to go to an Ivy League school with lower-than-average grades due to affirmative action.

    A black person has the privilege of being taken more seriously as a rapper or other urban culture figure.

    A black person has the privilege of being able to talk about race or challenge ideas bout racism more openly without being accused of 'whitesplaining' or something similar.

    A black person has the privilege of being taken more seriously than a white person if they were a victim of a hate crime. If a white person is attacked, kidnapped and/or abused because of their skin colour, there are evidently many people who won't even call that racism.

    There's also the fact a black person has the race card in their deck, ready to be pulled at a time of convenience.

    I would also call it a privilege to have the progressive media pander to you constantly. Don't even get me started on the pandering that occurs on university campuses (see the US and Canada presently).
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Just because I am confused by why the 1950s is relevant to the topic under discussion, which is a supposedly current issue, not a historical one. That is all.
    He made a comment labelling 99% of Jamaicans as thugs (among many other things he said which were not relevant to the discussion but I didn't see you questioning him about it) Anyway, I mentioned mass immigration because the racism and prejudice in his comment mirrors the racist views that existed during that time.

    I also linked you to more recent evidence that shows that institutional racism may still be an issue, which you chose to ignore so you must be trying to starting something for no reason.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Err mate, racism is the systematic oppression of people based on race and/or ethnicity. The system is made by and in favour of white people, so how is reverse racism a thing?? That being said white people can face prejudice but I wouldn't go as far as calling it racism.
    No - that's the new definition introduced by people who don't want to face the issues their rhetoric causes.

    Also word games aside, why is one better than the other? Oh I'm prejudiced but not racist, therefore it's better? Utterly ridiculous and a stupid semantic distraction to justify abhorrent behaviour.
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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    But the contention from a lot of people is that this myth of white privilege is exactly that, a myth. You simply saying black people are less privileged doesn't make it so
    Everyone has privileges. Some people have more privileges in comparison.
    I guess a lack of privileges can be swapped with out with the word disadvantages.
    Maybe white people aren't privilege but maybe incomparable to minorities, they have less disadvantages if that make sense.
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    (Original post by SmileyVibe)
    Everyone has privileges. Some people have more privileges in comparison.
    I guess a lack of privileges can be swapped with out with the word disadvantages.
    Maybe white people aren't privilege but maybe incomparable to minorities, they have less disadvantages if that make sense.
    I understand what you're trying to say but you're avoiding any substance. You need to actually demonstrate where the disadvantage exists
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    From a well respected elderly black man

    "How to get rid of racism? Stop talking about it."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6nmdwKh5fQ
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    It probably exists in certain contexts. Such as admissions and success in certain entertainment spaces.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    It depends on the context and circumstances. I can think of a few things that qualify:

    A black person has the privilege of being able to go to an Ivy League school with lower-than-average grades due to affirmative action.

    A black person has the privilege of being taken more seriously as a rapper or other urban culture figure.

    A black person has the privilege of being able to talk about race or challenge ideas bout racism more openly without being accused of 'whitesplaining' or something similar.

    A black person has the privilege of being taken more seriously than a white person if they were a victim of a hate crime. If a white person is attacked, kidnapped and/or abused because of their skin colour, there are evidently many people who won't even call that racism.

    There's also the fact a black person has the race card in their deck, ready to be pulled at a time of convenience.

    I would also call it a privilege to have the progressive media pander to you constantly. Don't even get me started on the pandering that occurs on university campuses (see the US and Canada presently).
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Unt...lack+privilege

    There is a whole book of Black Priviledge, there are unpriviledged black people and priviledged.

    One thing I saw first hand is how the priviledge black people capitalise on things underpriviledged have taking advantage of affirmitive action...
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Err mate, racism is the systematic oppression of people based on race and/or ethnicity. The system is made by and in favour of white people, so how is reverse racism a thing?? That being said white people can face prejudice but I wouldn't go as far as calling it racism.
    Racism is also a psychological fact that exists in people's minds, regardless of what demographic you come from and who it's directed against.

    Common parlance suggests that racism is prejudice based on race and/or ethnicity. I'm going to go with the definition used in common parlance rather than what some Sociology students define it as from their privileged little academic bubble. Social justice isn't an intellectual parlour game.
 
 
 
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