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B1242 - Multi-Spousal Marriages (Polygamy Legalisation) Bill 2017 Watch

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    B1242 - Multi-Spousal Marriages (Polygamy Legalisation) Bill 2017, TSR Liberal Party
    An Act legalising polygamy and the practice of multi-spousal marriages.

    BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-


    For the purposes of this Act-
    (i) 'Polygamy' refers to a single multi-spousal marriage of up to 4 individuals,
    (ii) 'Union' refers to multi-spousal marriages
    (iii) 'Legalise' refers to the removal of bigamy and polygamy related laws facilitating punishment for polygamy or bigamy,
    (iv) 'Multi-spousal' refers to a group of up to 4 people entering a legal union of marriage with the equivalent rights of traditional binary unions.
    (v) 'Coercive or controlling behaviour' refers to forceful behaviour which may raise suspicions of forced or unhappy partnerships.
    (vi) 'Public bodies' refers to register offices or other local authority-led ceremonies.
    (vii) 'Religious institutions' to non-governmental faith groups who object on moralistic grounds.

    1. Legalisation of Polygamy
    (1) It is legal to enter a single polygamous marriage of up to 4 individuals.

    2. Repeals
    (1) This Act repeals the following-
    (i) s.11(d) of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973
    (ii) s.57 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861

    3. Implementation
    (1) The implementation of this Act should be the sole responsibility of the local authorities of the UK.
    (2) Violation of this Act by public bodies by refusing services should be punishable via a revoking of the registrar’s local authority-granted registrar licence for a period of up to 6 months.
    (3) All other international polygamous unions will be recognised by the UK government and will be deemed lawful after the independent assessment by a community support officer to ascertain the wellbeing of multiples wives and/or husbands. Immigration laws apply the same to these individuals as they do to married couples, they will not be disadvantaged by having multiple spouses.
    (4) Independent assessment by a professional community support officer should be used prior to the union to ensure coercive/controlling behaviour or forced marriage does not occur as a result of this Act.
    (5) Multi-spousal unions have the same legal rights as binary unions.
    (6) Children retain the two parents as everyone else but have a presumption of guardianship over them by the other individuals in the marriage if the parents are deceased or absent.
    (7) Applying current inheritance laws would mean all individuals in the marriage are considered next of kin and would benefit equally from intestate provisions if no will was made.

    4. Exemptions
    (1) Religious institutions shall be exempt from compulsory implementation of this Act.
    (2) Refusing services is acceptable if there is-
    (i) threatening behaviour towards the registrar;
    (ii) suspicion of coercive or controlling behaviour;
    (iii) timetabling or administrative issues.

    5. Commencement, short title and extent
    (1) This Act may be cited as the Polygamy and Multi-Spousal Unions Act 2017
    (2) This bill shall extend to the United Kingdom; and
    (3) Shall come into force 1st September 2017 following Royal Assent.


    Notes: The right to marry is a right everyone should enjoy with as little state intervention and restriction as possible. Archaic societal norms and religious teaching shouldn't restrict the freedom of others to marry who they choose and how many they choose. The secular state should reject these outdated ideas of religious union and instead provide multi-spousal unions to those who so desire them. It's not the state’s place to define, restrict or control love and who/how many people others choose to marry. Practical constraints (such as inheritance, cohabitation, taxation laws etc) mean a maximum of 4 individuals can marry into a single polygamous union.
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    A bill that expands individual liberty, whilst suggesting a sensible limit for administrative purposes. An easy Aye from me.
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    Aye. If a group of individuals want to enter the arrangement then they ought to be allowed to do so.
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    Having discussed this in detail with my friends within the Government, I have been pursuaded to vote aye on this bill.
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    Aye. All makes sense if people choose to do so.
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    I can imagine this passing with very little difficulty.
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    I believe that the government should stay out of the business of marriage, and if a church wants to facilitate this type of marriage, it should be allowed to do so.
    Aye.
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    Brilliant Bill. Easy Aye and a great first bill from a certain new Liberal Member.
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    It's already happening on many occasions in Bradford and Birmingham so I don't see the point in stopping others doing it. Can anyone give me information on if this happens in any other religions aside from Islam and in past UK history
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    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    It's already happening on many occasions in Bradford and Birmingham so I don't see the point in stopping others doing it. Can anyone give me information on if this happens in any other religions aside from Islam and in past UK history
    Mr Speaker,

    I would like to inform the honourable member that besides Islam religions such as Mormonism, Judaism and Hinduism all condone polygamy. Even within Christianity, the Old Testament is fine with polygamy. The Anglo-Saxons widely practised polygamy, even as they turned Christian.
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    This bill is dangerous because there are no provisions deciding how inheritance would work in the absence of a will, what happens if not power of attorney is given, what happens when spouses disagree over treatment of a patient, and how taxes will work. If polygamy is going to be legalised, the bill legalising polygamy needs to explain the situation when it comes to the benefits spouses are afforded which work because there is one spouse.
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    Aye.
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    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    It's already happening on many occasions in Bradford and Birmingham so I don't see the point in stopping others doing it. Can anyone give me information on if this happens in any other religions aside from Islam and in past UK history
    Some Native American tribes have a tradition of polygamy. In Hinduism it is largely uncommon but still possible. There is ambiguity over the Buddhist attitude towards Polygamy, but is has been legal in Asia countries with high Buddhist populations; for most of these it is no longer legal though. Polygamy can also be found in some Pagan religions. The Old Testament does not forbid polygamy; though it is obviously not practised in Christianity. As for Judaism, it used to be common; until a religious ban in the 11th century.
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    In Egypt, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is legal
    In India, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is only legal for Muslims
    In Russia, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is illegal, but practice is not criminalised
    In China, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is illegal and practice criminalised
    Others: Legal status unknown


    Apologies for no colours in the key but I found the image but the key would not copy over. Since I am colourblind, I thought this would be the best option rather than guess.
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    I was unsure whether I could support such measures due to my worries about what this will mean for the development of children in secure families, but after reading such a reasonably worded bill, I don't believe I can vote against it.

    I shall be voting Aye.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)


    In Egypt, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is legal
    In India, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is only legal for Muslims
    In Russia, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is illegal, but practice is not criminalised
    In China, and other countries of that colour, Polygamy is illegal and practice criminalised
    Others: Legal status unknown


    Apologies for no colours in the key but I found the image but the key would not copy over. Since I am colourblind, I thought this would be the best option rather than guess.
    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Some Native American tribes have a tradition of polygamy. In Hinduism it is largely uncommon but still possible. There is ambiguity over the Buddhist attitude towards Polygamy, but is has been legal in Asia countries with high Buddhist populations; for most of these it is no longer legal though. Polygamy can also be found in some Pagan religions. The Old Testament does not forbid polygamy; though it is obviously not practised in Christianity. As for Judaism, it used to be common; until a religious ban in the 11th century.
    Cool thanks for the help

    My previous concerns were that it would be going in support of primarily the Islam belief as opposed to British tradition in order to satisfy this minority percentage of the population. On second thought I've decided it would be ridiculous of me to vote for this purely for tradition considering said tradition is built on Christian values, and as someone who doesn't actually believe in the Christianity - it would be quite contradictory for me to argue in support of keeping 100% Traditional (and hence Christian) ways.

    To put it frankly, I will be voting Aye on this bill
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    (Original post by Saunders16)
    I was unsure whether I could support such measures due to my worries about what this will mean for the development of children in secure families, but after reading such a reasonably worded bill, I don't believe I can vote against it.

    I shall be voting Aye.
    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Aye.
    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    It's already happening on many occasions in Bradford and Birmingham so I don't see the point in stopping others doing it. Can anyone give me information on if this happens in any other religions aside from Islam and in past UK history
    (Original post by Count Bezukhov)
    A bill that expands individual liberty, whilst suggesting a sensible limit for administrative purposes. An easy Aye from me.
    (Original post by Count Bezukhov)
    A bill that expands individual liberty, whilst suggesting a sensible limit for administrative purposes. An easy Aye from me.
    (Original post by Conceited)
    Aye. If a group of individuals want to enter the arrangement then they ought to be allowed to do so.
    (Original post by Tommy1boy)
    Having discussed this in detail with my friends within the Government, I have been pursuaded to vote aye on this bill.
    (Original post by TitanCream)
    Aye. All makes sense if people choose to do so.
    (Original post by Joel 96)
    I believe that the government should stay out of the business of marriage, and if a church wants to facilitate this type of marriage, it should be allowed to do so.
    Aye.
    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    Brilliant Bill. Easy Aye and a great first bill from a certain new Liberal Member.
    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    It's already happening on many occasions in Bradford and Birmingham so I don't see the point in stopping others doing it. Can anyone give me information on if this happens in any other religions aside from Islam and in past UK history
    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Aye.
    (Original post by Saunders16)
    I was unsure whether I could support such measures due to my worries about what this will mean for the development of children in secure families, but after reading such a reasonably worded bill, I don't believe I can vote against it.

    I shall be voting Aye.
    All of you fail to engage with the biggest argument against polygamy which is the impact on the development of children. If men remain in the marriage market, there is the possibility of high-status men investing their resources in obtaining more wives, spreading their genes, and gaining social status. It is the biological instinct of humans to mate, when these children are born the males will choose to neglect their children, and poorer men will be forced to invest their resources in finding any bride as many women share the high-status man. The concept of wealthier men neglecting their children seems strange, however, studies of historical polygamous societies confirm the phenomenon is strong. Studies revealed that in polygamous societies of past, poorer men had 6.9 children survive to the age of 15 compared to wealthier men who had 5.5 survive to 15. The same impact has been found from studying contemporary polygamous societies in Africa where children in polygamous families have higher rates of malnutrition, lower life expectancy, and worse health.

    What this bill does is place poorer children at a larger disadvantage, increase neglect of children, and place strain on the state who has to step in to take the place of father who refuse their parental duties because reproducing with new wives is seen as more desirable. And there will be a new cost on the state if there is a divorce that results in the father needing to pay child support. Men running around making babies for status will lead to the state needing to step in to pay for the children the men cannot afford to have.

    Laws against polygamy are in place to protect the valuable concept of a two-parent family which is the optimal conditions to raise children. In the eyes of the law each child may have two parents, however, in reality it will be different because if a man has many children with multiple wives, it is not possible for the man to be a present father for all of them: his attention will have to be shared among the wives. If MPs are serious about the well being, development, and mental state of children, this bill will be rejected. The idea that children in two-parents families do better than children raised in single-parent families, families where there is conflict, and families where the children are not given attention is founded in deep scientific research.
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    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    Cool thanks for the help

    My previous concerns were that it would be going in support of primarily the Islam belief as opposed to British tradition in order to satisfy this minority percentage of the population. On second thought I've decided it would be ridiculous of me to vote for this purely for tradition considering said tradition is built on Christian values, and as someone who doesn't actually believe in the Christianity - it would be quite contradictory for me to argue in support of keeping 100% Traditional (and hence Christian) ways.

    To put it frankly, I will be voting Aye on this bill
    I remember a poster in our school for British values. It detailed the five values, using the digits on a hand. My favourite point was when it said, the middle finger is raised to God.:rofl:
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    Nay

    Polygamy seems to me in reality to always be one man and more than one women, and in traditions or cultures where women are treated much less equally than men. Often it seems to me to sit alongside cultures where middle-aged or older men seeks a second younger bride, and where women are subjugated. No consideration seems to have been given to matters such as inheritance or pensions, or indeed some other practical considerations.

    This is a non-Western practice and I am disappointed that this has been proposed. It will do nothing for women's equality or human rights. I have not included the impact on children as this has been eloquently put already.
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    Aye, though I would prefer you didn't prohibit discrimination against them by private sector actors
 
 
 
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