Who won the general election?

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lunaclub
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I'm just interested to see your opinions about who won the general election. Especially considering these topics:
reasoning behind calling an election in 2017
what the polls said about the election result over the course of the 7 week campaign
manifesto issues
the progress of the opposition parties
the overall results or individual results (shock ones like Nick Clegg, Amber Rudd etc)
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JMR2021_
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(Original post by lunaclub)
I'm just interested to see your opinions about who won the general election. Especially considering these topics:
reasoning behind calling an election in 2017
what the polls said about the election result over the course of the 7 week campaign
manifesto issues
the progress of the opposition parties
the overall results or individual results (shock ones like Nick Clegg, Amber Rudd etc)
Well, nobody won it since there was a hung parliament, but Labour outperformed expectations, and Conservatives underperformed.
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Quiet Benin
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The labour party won the election as they gained 30 seats but obviously not enough to form even a majority.

The tories lost the election as Theresa May's main objection was to 'crush the opposition'. She lost seats, however is still in power because she has first try to form a minority government but instead chose a wack supply and demand with the DUP

There will be a general election (maybe autumn or somewhere in 2018/2019) soon where Labour are set to have a high majority for the first time in 1997.
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Underscore__
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(Original post by Quiet Benin)
The labour party won the election as they gained 30 seats but obviously not enough to form even a majority.

The tories lost the election as Theresa May's main objection was to 'crush the opposition'. She lost seats, however is still in power because she has first try to form a minority government but instead chose a wack supply and demand with the DUP

There will be a general election (maybe autumn or somewhere in 2018/2019) soon where Labour are set to have a high majority for the first time in 1997.
Labour didn't win, they exceeded expectations. If a Sunday league team played a premier league team and lost 1-0 they would have exceeded expectations but not won
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MrDystopia
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Several ways you could define this in my mind, which changes ones answer.

In regards to narrative/polls/reasoning for calling the election - Labour won, Tories lost, owing to the massive under performance from predicted 60+ seat majority to hung Parliament, as well as a gain in seats for Labour. Coincided with all the laughs about Corbyn being useless and was going to get decimated, as well as the huge poll lead the prompted calling the GE in the first place.

In regards to outright number of seats - Tories won the most seats and thus won the election.

In regards to political influence - DUP suddenly found themselves as kingmakers and so arguably gained the most from the election.

In regards to our voting system - Tories and Labour won the election at the expense of the other parties, since the vote share for the two major parties was at its highest for decades. Thus it can be argued that the winner of the election was the FPTP/return to 2 party politics system. UKIP seen as having a horrendous election as they lost a huge number of votes, probably the most noteworthy occurrence of the other parties.

In regards to pollsters - YouGov were pretty much the only ones predicting a hung Parliament (up until the day before the election I might add) and the other was...Survation? Otherwise, all other pollsters were pretty much out by like 60+ seats.

That's usually the ways the election was spun from what I've seen. Usually the first two narratives are pushed most, the first by Labour supporters, the second by Tories.
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thotproduct
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There wasn't a DEFINITIVE winner.

1) Hung parliament, nothing else to say really.

2) Conservatives just scraped by but only with the make-shift chair leg of the DUP to hold them up, enabling them to still maintain dominance, however weak it may be, however this foundation is weak and the DUP can influence quite a bit on decisions. They won, and lost.

3) Labour gained a LOT of ground, enough so to cause a hung parliament, outperforming expectations, they of course, still don't have that strong majority or a strong enough grip, but enough of a grip to stand a good challenge against the Tories if needed. Again, they won and lost the election.

In truth, I think the DUP were the closest winners here. They didn't LOSE anything (Labour lost a majority, and the Tories lost ground, and a dominant majority-at least without the coalition) and only GAINED influence after the Coalition, they have the power and the influence to strongarm or push for many Tory decisions.
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