Penny proud
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#1
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Hi guys does anyone know how to work out size of difference on SPSS I do not know if I am meant to treat this as finding the effect size or am I just describing the relationship I used cross tabulations for this question! Please help. lol I am stuggling
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Noodlzzz
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Not quite sure what you're asking.

Are you trying to find the difference between 2(+) variables in a t-test or ANOVA? Or the associated effect size from a test?
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Penny proud
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Hi

I honestly don't know, basically I have been given data on SPSS it includes a number of cases, but for this question I have to look at two variables "analyse the relationship between employment status and having experience of crime in the past 12 month. Which group is most likely and which group is least likely to be a victim of crime? What is the size of the difference?" I don't know if I can use Anova because I only have SPSS so I. Am guessing I will be doing a t-test?
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Noodlzzz
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(Original post by Penny proud)
Hi

I honestly don't know, basically I have been given data on SPSS it includes a number of cases, but for this question I have to look at two variables "analyse the relationship between employment status and having experience of crime in the past 12 month. Which group is most likely and which group is least likely to be a victim of crime? What is the size of the difference?" I don't know if I can use Anova because I only have SPSS so I. Am guessing I will be doing a t-test?
Ok you can do a t-test between two sets of data (employment status and experience of crime) if you put them in two separate columns.

Using descriptive statistics as well as the t-test results you can answer which group is most likely to be a victim of crime by if the t-test is significant, and if so, which direction. The size of the difference I think is referring to the descriptive difference between the two means, but could mean effect size, sorry, not sure.

And just to add, SPSS can do ANOVA and much more
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Penny proud
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You have actually helped me so much I'm so great full, which would you say is easier to see the difference anova or t-test, I think it means to work out the effect size too, is that the two means subtracted and then divided by the Standard deviation?

Also I wanted to ask if I am looking at a table on SPSS and I have a valid percent and percent Column can I write them down as percentages or do I have to type the numbers like this e.g (p < 0.1)
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Noodlzzz
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(Original post by Penny proud)
You have actually helped me so much I'm so great full, which would you say is easier to see the difference anova or t-test, I think it means to work out the effect size too, is that the two means subtracted and then divided by the Standard deviation?

Also I wanted to ask if I am looking at a table on SPSS and I have a valid percent and percent Column can I write them down as percentages or do I have to type the numbers like this e.g (p < 0.1)
ANOVA is essentially multiple t-tests for when there is more than two variables. So no, you don't need to use an ANOVA, and if you did, it would be the same result.

Not sure what you mean by valid percent column? But yes, you have to report the numbers in numerical form in APA standard.
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Penny proud
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Thank you I. Am going to work on the answer tonight when I have done it could I just send it to you via email so you could check it is answered correctly please?
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Noodlzzz
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(Original post by Penny proud)
Thank you I. Am going to work on the answer tonight when I have done it could I just send it to you via email so you could check it is answered correctly please?
Yeah, PM me
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Penny proud
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Alright thank you I will be sending this to you soon 😃
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Sarah1778
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I'm not sure if I'm wrong but isn't employment status categoric (nominal data)? So therefore it would be Chi Squared because you're testing for association?
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Penny proud
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(Original post by Sarah1778)
I'm not sure if I'm wrong but isn't employment status categoric (nominal data)? So therefore it would be Chi Squared because you're testing for association?
I could test it both ways and see what results I get? How would I do a chi squared please?
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