Withdrawing from uni...Kind of...

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HorribleDude
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So, let's say one of my "friends" went to uni in september 2015, but in about january-february 2016 he decided to stop going(multiple reasons), he didn't filled any forms for that or anything like that, he just stopped going to the classes at all and didn't informed anyone...Now in 2017...He just got his brain back in working order and wants to start another course (somewhere else, other course, doesn't really matter for the moment)...But surprise...He can't find any of his diplomas...Thinking they are still at the uni...And for him to get them back he'll need to go to the uni and fill in the withdrawing form and all the stuff related with the student loan...so "his" question is...What should he do...As he's kind of "scared" so to say to deal with this mess...And if possible will he still be able to go back to another uni course? Thanks.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by HorribleDude)
So, let's say one of my "friends" went to uni in september 2015, but in about january-february 2016 he decided to stop going(multiple reasons), he didn't filled any forms for that or anything like that, he just stopped going to the classes at all and didn't informed anyone...Now in 2017...He just got his brain back in working order and wants to start another course (somewhere else, other course, doesn't really matter for the moment)...But surprise...He can't find any of his diplomas...Thinking they are still at the uni...And for him to get them back he'll need to go to the uni and fill in the withdrawing form and all the stuff related with the student loan...so "his" question is...What should he do...As he's kind of "scared" so to say to deal with this mess...And if possible will he still be able to go back to another uni course? Thanks.
So what's the university done about his non attendance and no-show at all his examinations/coursework between February 2016 and July 2017? He would presumably had end-of-term exams in May/June 2016 which he didn't take. Neither would he have enrolled/reigstered in September 2016. So the university must have withdrawn him from the course

He will have communications from both the university informing him of his withdrawal and from SFE to recalculate his entitlement to student finance. Are you saying he's ignored all of this?
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HorribleDude
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(Original post by Reality Check)
So what's the university done about his non attendance and no-show at all his examinations/coursework between February 2016 and July 2017? He would presumably had end-of-term exams in May/June 2016 which he didn't take. Neither would he have enrolled/reigstered in September 2016. So the university must have withdrawn him from the course

He will have communications from both the university informing him of his withdrawal and from SFE to recalculate his entitlement to student finance. Are you saying he's ignored all of this?
That's the thing. I didn't received any letters from the uni or SFE. Not even an e-mail.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by HorribleDude)
That's the thing. I didn't received any letters from the uni or SFE. Not even an e-mail.
Right, so you were enrolled on a course at a publically-funded UK university at which you stopped attending in February 2016 and in the 17 months between then and now you've received not one single communication from the university or SFE... No letter, no phone call, no email to either your university address or your personal address? No attempt whatsoever by the uni to contact you to see whether you still wished to stay on the course, or that they'd taken the decision to withdraw you for non attendance? And nothing from SFE, following the inevitable information from the Uni that you'd withdrawn or gone AWOL...

Ok.
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999tigger
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(Original post by HorribleDude)
So, let's say one of my "friends" went to uni in september 2015, but in about january-february 2016 he decided to stop going(multiple reasons), he didn't filled any forms for that or anything like that, he just stopped going to the classes at all and didn't informed anyone...Now in 2017...He just got his brain back in working order and wants to start another course (somewhere else, other course, doesn't really matter for the moment)...But surprise...He can't find any of his diplomas...Thinking they are still at the uni...And for him to get them back he'll need to go to the uni and fill in the withdrawing form and all the stuff related with the student loan...so "his" question is...What should he do...As he's kind of "scared" so to say to deal with this mess...And if possible will he still be able to go back to another uni course? Thanks.
Dude why would the uni have his diplomas? Highly unlikely they would keep original certificates used as evidence and they will have sent them back. Is this in the UK.

Either you or his mum could contact student welfare pr admissions and seek their assistance in resolving the situation by formally withdrawing or confirming the Uni has withdrawn him.

He can then apply via UCAS as normal (assuming UK) for either 2018 or through clearing for 2017. SFE will finance this, as they allow you one gift year for mistakes such as this.

Get your head out of the ground and just deal with it. Can be sorted in a few phone calls. They wont be angry or mad and theres nothing to be scared about.

If you are scared get your mum to do it.
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HorribleDude
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Right, so you were enrolled on a course at a publically-funded UK university at which you stopped attending in February 2016 and between then and now you've received not one single communication from the university or SFE...

Ok.
I am for real. If they would have contacted me I would have not ignored, especially when it's about this kind of huge sums of money that I'll have to repay. All I want is some sort of advice, if possible.
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999tigger
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ps I find it hard to believe that no communication was sent by the uni even to your uni account that you had failed your exams.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by HorribleDude)
I am for real. If they would have contacted me I would have not ignored, especially when it's about this kind of huge sums of money that I'll have to repay. All I want is some sort of advice, if possible.
If we, for the sake of argument, accept that this is true, why have you not contacted them? Given you've brought up that you owe money, which I didn't mention anywhere (itself an interesting observation).
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username1495504
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(Original post by HorribleDude)
That's the thing. I didn't received any letters from the uni or SFE. Not even an e-mail.

If that's true what uni was it!?
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Juno
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SFE should have at least sent a yearly statement to say how much is owed. The rest, well, I can see it happening - they would probably send a few emails initially to chase up missed sessions, but students are expected to be adults and engage to sort any problems. Plus the OP's quote that "he just got his brain back in working order" suggests that any letters received immediately might have been ignored and forgotten due to brain fog.

OP, you need to contact the SLC - you should be able to log into an online account, or if not you can phone them. Find out if you're being chased for any overpayment. Most of the loan will just be repaid under the usual rules (so you have to be earning over the threshold) and isn't a problem, but you would need to deal with any overpayment before you would be eligible for another student loan.
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loooopppyyy
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I'm guessing your friend will have a nice big repayment amount floating around somewhere. ^_^
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artful_lounger
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As someone who stopped going to lectures and submitting assignments myself for a period of time due to mental health issues: I can assure that you will have heard from them unless you're attending Trump University or something equally unrecognised. After missing two assignments and several lectures my lecturers and course coordinators highlighted that I hadn't been attending to my personal tutor and director of studies, both of whom attempted to contact me. When I didn't respond because I wasn't checking my emails, a member of the wellbeing team was sent to my last listed term time address (where I was still resident) to see if I was all right.

I find it difficult to believe there was no attempted contact, or evidence of attempted contact whatsoever in your case. To begin with regardless of whether the letters etc from SFE arrive, a digital copy of every piece of correspondence is uploaded to your SFE account.In either case, you should contact the university and SFE each directly, explain your situation and see what they can do about it. I would recommend doing so sooner rather than later, as if you want to potentially return to university and there are discrepancies in your SFE loans then it can cause serious financial difficulties.

At the end of the day this needs to be dealt with, and realistically you are the only one who can do so - as your parents won't have all the information about your time at university, and due to DPA considerations either or both will need to speak to you at least once, to confirm that your parents can act on your behalf. Also there is no escaping a student loan. It never goes away, it will be there until it's paid off or written off. If you don't declare it when beginning a new job, you will be committing fraud, which has much farther reaching implications than phoning up somebody from the university and student finance. Just do it.

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Anonymous #1
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[QUOTE=Reality Check;73011020]If we, for the sake of argument, accept that this is true, why have you not contacted them? Given you've brought up that you owe money, which I didn't mention anywhere (itself an interesting observation).[/QUOTE

The chances are the uni would have withdrawn the student during academic year 2015/16? Universities have to confirm continuing students to the student loan company to receive funding. I find it unlikely that both the university and the SLC failed to contact the student.

In addition universities DO NOT retain original copies of certificates, these are legally the property of the student. The student can always,if necessary, obtain replacement copies (probably at a small fee) from the awarding body.

In terms of student finance my understanding (happy to be corrected here) is that all students get one years' grace. If you enrol on a degree and drop out in the first year you have still accrued that debt. You will be financed for another chance on another first year. However if you subsequently drop out of that one again, that's it, the student has had their chance re first years. So in effect all students have the opportunity for four years worth of finance for a three year undergraduate degree.]

I do think more info should be out there regarding the consequences of decisions students make. To the OP basically it is what it is. You're the one who will need to resolve this. I am assuming you are thinking of clearing in a few weeks?

Contact your awarding body for proof of your qualification ( if you can) between now and clearing. If you do apply for another course understand the financial implications of your decision. Best of luck to you, hope the next year goes better 😀
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
In addition universities DO NOT retain original copies of certificates, these are legally the property of the student. The student can always,if necessary, obtain replacement copies (probably at a small fee) from the awarding body.
Just to note this isn't correct if you're referring to public examinations like A levels. Replacement certificates are never issued - instead the student can obtain a 'Statement of Results' which stands in lieu.
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210555
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Just to note this isn't correct if you're referring to public examinations like A levels. Replacement certificates are never issued - instead the student can obtain a 'Statement of Results' which stands in lieu.
I " think" it does depend on the qualification though. The OP mentioned "diplomas" so I am guessing these aren't A levels?.

I am assuming any original documentation from awarding bodies confirming statements of achievement should suffice as proof? In addition to help the OP.

Do all UK students now have something called a ULN ( unique learner number) which lists their qualifications on a national level. I'm not all that sure about this, I wonder if you know?

Thanks for the clarification re A levels. 😀
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(Original post by 210555)
I " think" it does depend on the qualification though. The OP mentioned "diplomas" so I am guessing these aren't A levels?.

I am assuming any original documentation from awarding bodies confirming statements of achievement should suffice as proof? In addition to help the OP.

Do all UK students now have something called a ULN ( unique learner number) which lists their qualifications on a national level. I'm not all that sure about this, I wonder if you know?

Thanks for the clarification re A levels. 😀
Yes, you're right about the Statement of Results - they are the equivalent of the certificate. In general, no public examinations will re-issue certificates (this would include 'diploma-style' courses, but the definitive advice will always be found from the awarding body concerned.

You're quite right about the ULN - this number uniquely matches the PLR (personal learning record) to the student and everyone over the age of 13 has one nowadays. They are more of an exams-office/UCAS piece of data, and I doubt whether an individual learner would ever know their ULN (or probably even know of its existence), but you're quite right in what you say. Also (as you probably know) the ULN can be used by HE Admissions Tutors to verify academic entry qualifications which UCAS don't automatically supply.
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