businessman321
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Hi,

I'm interested in studying an undergraduate degree in Finance from year 2018/19. I'm currently looking for good universities in England (preferably in London) and Cass seemed a good option, however, now I'm confused, because most of the opinions about Cass in this webpage are negative (which make no sense to me, because rankings say it's one of the best business schools in England and in the EU).

I have a couple of questions:

1) Is it really that bad?

2) Will I be able to land a job in the Big Four with a Finance degree from Cass?

3) Could you name some good universities in England for finance?

Thanks in advance
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IPEguy
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Yes it's definitely a good business school. It's more tier 2 than tier one (ox cam lse Warwick imperial) but will definitely give you good opportunities.
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businessman321
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(Original post by IPEguy)
Yes it's definitely a good business school. It's more tier 2 than tier one (ox cam lse Warwick imperial) but will definitely give you good opportunities.
Will it be enough with a bachelor's degree? Or I'll need a master's as well?
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IPEguy
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Definitely enough for big four. Its more about personality with big four than degree necessarily, I misread your post and thought you were talking about IB. I have a friend in one of the most sought after big four roles but has bsc and msc from good average uni (below cass). Focus on business areas that interest you and get a good grade at bsc, that is more important, they want people who really really really want it.
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AcademiaPlayer
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Cass Business School is seriously becoming a very strong player in the business eduction sphere. Check out their ranking in 2018. The school has some of the best researchers in the industry and is situated in one of the largest financial centers in the world, the city of london.
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AcademiaPlayer
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  1. It's funny how few people seem to actually get what a business school is .
    LSE is not a business school, if you're refering to its general ranking then it would probably top the list alongside Oxbridge etc..
    Seeing UCL classified as a top business school is akin to a joke, their business school isn't even close to toping the ranks, It is tier 3 at best. However, I will admit that they are making progress.
    In the UK, the best business schools, based upon the MBA ranking as a proxy for overall quality of education, working opportunities, prestige:

    1st : ex- æquo: Cambridge Judge Business School - LBS - Oxford University
    2nd : Warwick- Cass Business School- Imperial business school
    3rd : Manchester- Bristol- Durham- Nottingham

    When choosing a dregree, you must establish whether its value will increase with time or not.
    Since Brexit, the only location which remains unconditionally a target for business schools is London. Warwick understood this a few years ago when they decided to set up a campus in the shard tower. Unfortunately, it only hosts executive programs, which in terms of overall value for money are worthless. Cass, Imperial and UCL certainly have the advantage of being situated in London. Cass in particular is positioned in the historical heart of Finance, the city of London. UCL is building campuses in Canary Wharf which isn't such a bad move.
    Judging from the rankings, Cass is certainly a business school to take into consideration when judging the potential for future progression, for 2 reasons:
    The current dean of the School Marianne Lewis is doing a tremendous job, leveraging her contacts through her father- the ex vice dean of Harvard Business School. Secondly, Research at Cass Business School has become internationally recognized as shown by the success of the Cass M&A research center managed by an ex-senior exec from Jp morgan and ex- professor at Oxford.
    Imperial certainly is improving its rankings as it leverages its incredibly reputed math course. This constitutes a great advantage when it comes to the quant side of business school courses- financial mathematics.

    To sum up, if you are interested in a degree outside of business, then consider a degree in economics from LSE or Oxbridge. These will get you into investment banking very easily.
    If you're interested in Business School ( grad level) , Cass has the most potential to becoming very prestigious in the coming years, Imperial BS certainly follows in Cass's footsteps. Warwick is relatively safe, even though it will probably lose a part of its appeal because of its non proximity to the financial cente.
    If your grades aren't too good, try to go abroad and go for a BBA at Essec Business School or EDHEDC in France; or one of the top spanish Bus schools. All of which are comparable to the list mentioned above and will get you farther than tier 3 British business Schools.
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hanley9
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(Original post by AcademiaPlayer)
  1. It's funny how few people seem to actually get what a business school is .
    LSE is not a business school, if you're refering to its general ranking then it would probably top the list alongside Oxbridge etc..
    Seeing UCL classified as a top business school is akin to a joke, their business school isn't even close to toping the ranks, It is tier 3 at best. However, I will admit that they are making progress.
    In the UK, the best business schools, based upon the MBA ranking as a proxy for overall quality of education, working opportunities, prestige:

    1st : ex- æquo: Cambridge Judge Business School - LBS - Oxford University
    2nd : Warwick- Cass Business School- Imperial business school
    3rd : Manchester- Bristol- Durham- Nottingham

    When choosing a dregree, you must establish whether its value will increase with time or not.
    Since Brexit, the only location which remains unconditionally a target for business schools is London. Warwick understood this a few years ago when they decided to set up a campus in the shard tower. Unfortunately, it only hosts executive programs, which in terms of overall value for money are worthless. Cass, Imperial and UCL certainly have the advantage of being situated in London. Cass in particular is positioned in the historical heart of Finance, the city of London. UCL is building campuses in Canary Wharf which isn't such a bad move.
    Judging from the rankings, Cass is certainly a business school to take into consideration when judging the potential for future progression, for 2 reasons:
    The current dean of the School Marianne Lewis is doing a tremendous job, leveraging her contacts through her father- the ex vice dean of Harvard Business School. Secondly, Research at Cass Business School has become internationally recognized as shown by the success of the Cass M&A research center managed by an ex-senior exec from Jp morgan and ex- professor at Oxford.
    Imperial certainly is improving its rankings as it leverages its incredibly reputed math course. This constitutes a great advantage when it comes to the quant side of business school courses- financial mathematics.

    To sum up, if you are interested in a degree outside of business, then consider a degree in economics from LSE or Oxbridge. These will get you into investment banking very easily.
    If you're interested in Business School ( grad level) , Cass has the most potential to becoming very prestigious in the coming years, Imperial BS certainly follows in Cass's footsteps. Warwick is relatively safe, even though it will probably lose a part of its appeal because of its non proximity to the financial cente.
    If your grades aren't too good, try to go abroad and go for a BBA at Essec Business School or EDHEDC in France; or one of the top spanish Bus schools. All of which are comparable to the list mentioned above and will get you farther than tier 3 British business Schools.
What has changed in the past 5-10 years to make you think that not being in London will be increasingly disadvantageous? If anything, I'd have thought that better technology would mean the opposite.
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username3612318
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cass isnt bad, its just not hyped as badly as oxford lse etc but i can assure you itll get the job done (in terms of securing a job within the big 4)

to answer your 3rd question, it depends on you. if you want to learn the nitty gritty behind finance then i say go to a business school (either wbs or cass), if you care more about the rep lse does a finance course, go for that. all 3 will get you to a good job within finance, just depends on you doing the right ecs/internships
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