It's possible to believe in Islam WITHOUT having to rely on faith? Watch

Abu_Lahab
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Can one justify their belief in Islam using a chain of objective, logical arguments?

Or at some point, does there have to be a leap of faith?
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_gcx
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Most don't seem to view faith as inherently irrational, rather admirable, hence you may struggle to get an answer.
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Plantagenet Crown
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I've yet to see a rational, logical and coherent argument for Islam's truth that doesn't rely on circular reasoning.
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username3108158
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On a serious note, I don't understand the question :dontknow:
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Abu_Lahab
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(Original post by _gcx)
Most don't seem to view faith as inherently irrational, rather admirable, hence you may struggle to get an answer.
I have faith that a Muslim will reply
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username3108158
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(Original post by Abu_Lahab)
I have faith that a Muslim will reply
They just did.
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S.G.
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(Original post by Abu_Lahab)
Can one justify their belief in Islam using a chain of objective, logical arguments?

Or at some point, does there have to be a leap of faith?
I think to believe in any religion or God is a leap of faith, and I say this being religious myself.

For me there is no logical arguement you can put forward to prove the existence of anything, but instead there are questions like "who created everything?" which can provide the basis of a faith.

Basically if you have a non believer and you want to convince them there is a God, you can't.
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_gcx
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
I think to believe in any religion or God is a leap of faith, and I say this being religious myself.

For me there is no logical arguement you can put forward to prove the existence of anything, but instead there are questions like "who created everything?" which can provide the basis of a faith.

Basically if you have a non believer and you want to convince them there is a God, you can't.
Out of interest - what is the "default" view, in your eyes? (ie. are people born with a complete ignorance to religion, or are people born with a "naturally occurring" belief in whichever deity you believe in)
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Abu_Lahab
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(Original post by ClearSky)
On a serious note, I don't understand the question :dontknow:
A leap of faith is "an act of believing in or attempting something whose existence or outcome cannot be proved or known."

Basically, do you believe in Islam knowing that you cannot prove it to yourself with absolute certainty if you wanted to?
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Abu_Lahab
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
I think to believe in any religion or God is a leap of faith, and I say this being religious myself.
does this not feel like you're gambling your life? Not being certain of the outcome, yet committing your life to it regardless?
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
I think to believe in any religion or God is a leap of faith, and I say this being religious myself.

For me there is no logical arguement you can put forward to prove the existence of anything, but instead there are questions like "who created everything?" which can provide the basis of a faith.

Basically if you have a non believer and you want to convince them there is a God, you can't.
This
Regardless of religious texts, belief in religion is always a leap of faith
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username3108158
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(Original post by Abu_Lahab)
A leap of faith is "an act of believing in or attempting something whose existence or outcome cannot be proved or known."

Basically, do you believe in Islam knowing that you cannot prove it to yourself with absolute certainty if you wanted to?
Well, yeah.
I cannot prove that there is a god but I believe that there is
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S.G.
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(Original post by _gcx)
Out of interest - what is the "default" view, in your eyes? (ie. are people born with a complete ignorance to religion, or are people born with a "naturally occurring" belief in whichever deity you believe in)
We are obviously influenced by the people around us.

Personally, I think people aren't born with a naturally occurring belief.
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S.G.
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(Original post by Abu_Lahab)
does this not feel like you're gambling your life? Not being certain of the outcome, yet committing your life to it regardless?
I'm a Sikh, so my religion simply teaches to live your life as a morally good person and you'll achieve salvation.

Not only Sikhs can achieve salvation, anyone who lives their life in a good way can.

I don't see how I'm gambling my life though. Even if there isn't a God, what harm is it in believing if it makes me a better person anyway.
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_gcx
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
We are obviously influenced by the people around us.

Personally, I think people aren't born with a naturally occurring belief.
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S.G.
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(Original post by _gcx)
Is this not obvious though?

For me, as my life has gone on my belief in God overtime has increased. I won't say reasons.
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_gcx
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
Is this not obvious though?

For me, as my life has gone on my belief in God overtime has increased. I won't say reasons.
I have seen many on here claim otherwise; ie. that people are born with a natural belief in and urge to submit to/serve "God", but then stray away from the "correct path". You can see how people think that way, considering their upbringing.
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popo111
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(Original post by Abu_Lahab)
Can one justify their belief in Islam using a chain of objective, logical arguments?
Not sure how using only objective and logical arguments would constitute as an "belief". It's something they now "know".

(Original post by Abu_Lahab)
Or at some point, does there have to be a leap of faith?
Yes, I would argue there is faith involved in religion.

Like there is in most (if not all) beliefs
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Abu_Lahab
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
I'm a Sikh, so my religion simply teaches to live your life as a morally good person and you'll achieve salvation.

Not only Sikhs can achieve salvation, anyone who lives their life in a good way can.

I don't see how I'm gambling my life though. Even if there isn't a God, what harm is it in believing if it makes me a better person anyway.
Yeah I appreciate your honesty and for a non-Sikh that is a nice sentiment

I see where you're coming from, but for me it comes down to having beliefs that I can say reflect reality rather than beliefs that don't? if that makes sense
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S.G.
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(Original post by _gcx)
I have seen many on here claim otherwise; ie. that people are born with a natural belief in and urge to submit to/serve "God", but then stray away from the "correct path". You can see how people think that way, considering their upbringing.
Yeah I don't think like that.

Idgaf what people do tbh. Only two types of people in this world, good and bad.
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