Want to study Space/Aerospace Eng BUT i hate electrical engineering!

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nesstargaryen
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So i just graduated university with a 1st class degree in applied physics. My dream has always been to work for companies such as NASA and SpaceX so i thought the path to get there would be to do a masters in Aero/Space engineering. However i hate electrical eng/electronics. Electromagnetism and electronics was my least enjoyable module in uni and i really struggled through it.

My most enjoyable modules were space science and i did my disseration in an astrophysics topic and really enjoyed that, it was also my highest mark - 85%

However i've been told there are NO jobs in astrophysics, so although i enjoy studying it, it will get me nowhere. Do you think i should suffer through electrical eng modules in my space eng masters. I don't want to spend money for a masters course that i'm going to dislike/feel uninspired doing. How heavy is aerospace focused on electrical components as opposed to mechanical?


I have offers for MSc Space Engineering
and MSc Astrophysics at good universities...

What should i do?
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artful_lounger
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There are plenty of funded PhD's in Astrophysics, and following from that there are many roles you can go into that use the skills built up during that, if you don't remain in academia. Yes there isn't a great deal of "astrophysics" work outside of academia because it's somewhat necessarily an academic area, but there are various related areas you can go into - e.g. software development for the met office.

Space Engineering is very heavy on the electronic engineering aspects, as most of it is designing the various systems and subsystems on e.g. satellites etc. The actual process of launching it into space and planning orbits is not as much a part of it. Some of this is more software based (programming the control systems and so on) but a lot is hardware.

If astro is an area of interest I'd suggest pursuing a PhD in the area - then depending on how that goes and your feelings afterwards, you may well stay in academia in that area, or go on to other things. As mentioned, there are a lot of possible careers following an astro PhD; they tend to cover a lot of computational modelling so there are good prospects in e.g. software development, data science, quantitative finance, and various computational modelling roles in engineering sectors among others.
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Smack
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(Original post by nesstargaryen)
How heavy is aerospace focused on electrical components as opposed to mechanical?
There are lots of areas of engineering in the aerospace industry that are not focused on electrical. For example, structures, aerodynamics, design of all the mechanical components...

If you want a career in aerospace, you may just have to do the electrical components of the degree. Lots of people study various engineering degrees with modules/components they don't like. I wouldn't let that deter you from the career.
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nesstargaryen
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
There are plenty of funded PhD's in Astrophysics, and following from that there are many roles you can go into that use the skills built up during that, if you don't remain in academia. Yes there isn't a great deal of "astrophysics" work outside of academia because it's somewhat necessarily an academic area, but there are various related areas you can go into - e.g. software development for the met office.

Space Engineering is very heavy on the electronic engineering aspects, as most of it is designing the various systems and subsystems on e.g. satellites etc. The actual process of launching it into space and planning orbits is not as much a part of it. Some of this is more software based (programming the control systems and so on) but a lot is hardware.

If astro is an area of interest I'd suggest pursuing a PhD in the area - then depending on how that goes and your feelings afterwards, you may well stay in academia in that area, or go on to other things. As mentioned, there are a lot of possible careers following an astro PhD; they tend to cover a lot of computational modelling so there are good prospects in e.g. software development, data science, quantitative finance, and various computational modelling roles in engineering sectors among others.
Thank you for replying so quickly! Yes i have thought about going the PHD route but i'm not sure i want to spend all those years at uni. I'd rather be working and getting more hands on experience i think
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nesstargaryen
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(Original post by Smack)
There are lots of areas of engineering in the aerospace industry that are not focused on electrical. For example, structures, aerodynamics, design of all the mechanical components...

If you want a career in aerospace, you may just have to do the electrical components of the degree. Lots of people study various engineering degrees with modules/components they don't like. I wouldn't let that deter you from the career.
Yes i think you may be right, i may have a look at the aero modules and try to select modules that are not so electronics based
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Helloworld_95
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Most Aerospace MSc programs are very Mechanical focused, but from the sounds of it you applied for Space Engineering which is quite different.

The fact of the matter is that most Space related jobs are going to revolve around electronics, especially in the UK where pretty much all of our development is for Satellite production and services (excluding Reaction Engines but those jobs are extremely coveted). And it's pretty much impossible to work in Aerospace (and thus the mechanical side) in other countries, the only countries with significant space industry are China, Russia, USA, India, and France. From what I've seen it's more difficult to work in the Space industry in the US than even in China or Russia as someone who isn't a resident or citizen, that leaves France as your only real option, which means achieving a working level of French first. Even then, rocket development jobs are fairly limited because there's not a whole lot of room for improvement, so you will struggle if you stick to the mechanical side of things.
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